Orthopedic Surgery

Articles

  • H. Atmani, F. Merienne, D. Fofi, and P. Trouilloud, “Computer aided surgery system for shoulder prosthesis placement,” Computer Aided Surgery, vol. 12, iss. 1, pp. 60-70, 2007.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Atmani2007,
      author = {Atmani, H. and Merienne, F. and Fofi, D. and Trouilloud, P.},
      title = {Computer aided surgery system for shoulder prosthesis placement},
      journal = {Computer Aided Surgery},
      year = {2007},
      volume = {12},
      pages = {60 - 70},
      number = {1},
      abstract = {The aim of this research is to provide a light and easy-handling shoulder
      model for surgeons in order to ease the preoperative and peroperative
      work required when replacing the shoulder joint with a prosthesis.
      The digital mock-up of the shoulder is simplified according to the
      criteria of the surgeon, allowing easy manipulation of the model
      for a virtual operation. The model can be parameterized from X-rays
      or CT images. This paper describes the method used to obtain a virtual
      mock-up that is useful for preoperative simulation. Furthermore,
      it is shown that a real-time augmented reality system could be achieved
      for peroperative application.},
      file = {Atmani2007.pdf:Atmani2007.pdf:PDF},
      keywords = {APP, SLR, PRS, OTS},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.11.11}
    }
  • R. W. a Barrett, B. L. Davies, M. P. S. F. Gomes, S. J. Harris, J. Henckel, M. Jakopec, F. M. Rodriguez Y Baena, and J. P. Cobb, “Preoperative planning and intraoperative guidance for accurate computer-assisted minimally invasive hip resurfacing surgery,” Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part H: Journal of Engineering in Medicine, vol. 220, iss. 7, pp. 759-773, 2006.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Barrett2006,
      author = {Barrett, a R W and Davies, B L and Gomes, M P S F and Harris, S J
      and Henckel, J and Jakopec, M and {Rodriguez Y Baena}, F M and Cobb,
      J P},
      title = {Preoperative planning and intraoperative guidance for accurate computer-assisted
      minimally invasive hip resurfacing surgery},
      journal = {Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part H: Journal
      of Engineering in Medicine},
      year = {2006},
      volume = {220},
      pages = {759--773},
      number = {7},
      month = jan,
      abstract = {Hip resurfacing is an alternative to total hip replacement (THR) and
      is particularly suitable for the younger, more active patient. However,
      it is a more demanding procedure. This paper describes a system that
      enables the surgeon to plan the surgery preoperatively with optimally
      sized and placed components, and then transfer this plan to an intraoperative
      system that registers computer models to the real patient and tracks
      surgical tools, allowing the surgeon to ensure that the bone is resected
      correctly and that the components are fitted in accordance with the
      plan. The paper describes a series of instruments used with the system
      which are locked to the bone. These instruments serve the dual purpose
      of soft tissue retraction and bone immobilization. The system will
      shortly be the subject of laboratory and clinical evaluation. Registration,
      a cornerstone of the tracked instrument system, has been tested,
      and accuracy measures are provided. Experimental results for the
      remainder of the system will be provided after clinical trials.},
      file = {Barrett2006.pdf:Barrett2006.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0954-4119},
      keywords = {computer-assisted surgery,hip resurfacing,minimally invasive surgery,preoperative
      planning,surgical navigation, OTS, SUR, APP, SLR, PLA, GUI},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • D. Briem, A. H. Ruecker, J. Neumann, M. Gebauer, D. Kendoff, T. Gehrke, W. Lehmann, U. Schumacher, J. M. Rueger, and L. G. Grossterlinden, “3D fluoroscopic navigated reaming of the glenoid for total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA),” Computer Aided Surgery, pp. 1-7, 2011.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Briem2011,
      author = {Briem, D. and Ruecker, A.H. and Neumann, J. and Gebauer, M. and Kendoff,
      D. and Gehrke, T. and Lehmann, W. and Schumacher, U. and Rueger,
      J.M. and Grossterlinden, L.G.},
      title = {3D fluoroscopic navigated reaming of the glenoid for total shoulder
      arthroplasty (TSA)},
      journal = {Computer Aided Surgery},
      year = {2011},
      pages = {1 - 7},
      number = {0},
      issn = {1092-9088},
      publisher = {Informa UK Ltd UK}
    }
  • P. Buchler, “Benefits of an anatomical reconstruction of the humeral head during shoulder arthroplasty: a finite element analysis,” Clinical Biomechanics, vol. 19, iss. 1, pp. 16-23, 2004.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Buchler2004,
      author = {Buchler, P},
      title = {Benefits of an anatomical reconstruction of the humeral head during
      shoulder arthroplasty: a finite element analysis},
      journal = {Clinical Biomechanics},
      year = {2004},
      volume = {19},
      pages = {16-23},
      number = {1},
      month = {January},
      abstract = {Objective. To study the influence of the shape of the prosthetic humeral
      head on shoulder biomechanics and then to evaluate the benefits of
      an anatomical reconstruction of the humeral head after shoulder arthroplasty.
      Design. A 3D numerical model of a healthy shoulder was reconstructed.
      The model included the proximal humerus, the scapula and, for stability
      purposes, the subscapularis, infraspinatus and supraspinatus rotator
      cuff muscles. Background. Shoulder prostheses used nowadays, called
      third generation, allow for a better adaptation of the implant to
      the anatomy of the proximal humerus than previously used implants.
      However, no biomechanical study has shown the benefits of this anatomical
      reconstruction of the humeral head. Methods. The model was used to
      compare the biomechanics of a shoulder without implant with the biomechanics
      of the same shoulder after humeral hemiarthroplasty. Two humeral
      components were tested: a second-generation prosthesis and an implant
      with an anatomically reconstructed humeral head. Results. The anatomical
      reconstruction of the humeral head restored the physiological motions
      and limited eccentric loading of the glenoid. Conversely, the second-generation
      implant produced contact forces in the superior extremity of the
      glenoid surface leading to bone stresses up to 8 times higher than
      for the intact shoulder. Conclusions. This analysis provided insights
      into the mechanical effects of different reconstructions of the humeral
      head and highlighted the advantages of anatomical reconstructions
      of the humeral head during shoulder arthroplasty.},
      file = {Buchler2004.pdf:Buchler2004.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {02680033},
      keywords = {anatomical reconstruction,finite element,hemiarthroplasty,shoulder,
      OCS, TEC},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • M. Cimerman and A. Kristan, “Preoperative planning in pelvic and acetabular surgery: the value of advanced computerised planning modules.,” Injury, vol. 38, iss. 4, pp. 442-9, 2007.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Cimerman2007,
      author = {Cimerman, Matej and Kristan, Anze},
      title = {Preoperative planning in pelvic and acetabular surgery: the value
      of advanced computerised planning modules.},
      journal = {Injury},
      year = {2007},
      volume = {38},
      pages = {442-9},
      number = {4},
      month = {April},
      abstract = {An experimental computer program for virtual operation of fractured
      pelvis and acetabulum based on real data of the fracture is presented.
      The program consists of two closely integrated tools, the 3D viewing
      tools and the surgeon simulation tools. Using 3D viewing tools the
      virtual model of a fractured pelvis is built. This procedure is performed
      by computer engineers. Data from CT of a real injury in DICOM format
      are used. With segmentation process each fracture segment becomes
      a separate object and is assigned a different colour. The virtual
      object is then transferred to the personal computer of the surgeon.
      Bone fragments can be moved and rotated in all three planes and reduction
      is performed. After reduction, fixation can be undertaken. The appropriate
      ostheosynthetic material can be chosen. Contouring of the plate is
      performed automatically to the reduced pelvis. The screws can be
      inserted into the plate or across the fracture. The direction and
      length of the screws is controlled by turning the pelvis or by making
      bones more transparent. The modeling of the plate in all three axes
      can be recorded as the exact length of the screws. There is also
      a simulation tool for intraoperative C-arm imaging in all directions.
      All the steps of the procedure are recorded and printed out. Postoperative
      matching of real operation and virtual procedure is also possible.
      We operated on 10 cases using virtual preoperative planning and found
      it very useful. The international study is still in progress. One
      case is presented demonstrating all the possibilities of the virtual
      planning and surgery. The presented computer program is an easily
      usable application which brings significant value and new opportunities
      in clinical practice (preoperative planning), teaching and research.},
      file = {Cimerman2007.pdf:Cimerman2007.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0020-1383},
      keywords = {Acetabulum,Acetabulum: injuries,Acetabulum: surgery,Computer Simulation,Europe,Fractures,
      Bone,Fractures, Bone: surgery,Humans,Imaging, Three-Dimensional,Israel,Male,Middle
      Aged,Pelvic Bones,Pelvic Bones: injuries,Pelvic Bones: surgery,Planning
      Techniques,Software,Surgery, Computer-Assisted,Surgery, Computer-Assisted:
      methods,Tomography, X-Ray Computed,User-Computer Interface, APP,
      PLA, SUR, OTS, SLR, VOR},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      pmid = {17400226},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • J. Clarke, A. Deakin, A. Nicol, and F. Picard, “Measuring the positional accuracy of computer assisted surgical tracking systems,” Computer Aided Surgery, pp. 1-5, 2010.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Clarke2010,
      author = {Clarke, JV and Deakin, AH and Nicol, AC and Picard, F.},
      title = {Measuring the positional accuracy of computer assisted surgical tracking
      systems},
      journal = {Computer Aided Surgery},
      year = {2010},
      pages = {1 - 5},
      number = {0},
      issn = {1092-9088},
      publisher = {Informa UK Ltd UK}
    }
  • S. L. Delp, D. S. Stulberg, B. Davies, F. Picard, and F. Leitner, “Computer assisted knee replacement,” Clinical orthopaedics and related research, vol. 354, p. 49, 1998.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Delp1998,
      author = {Delp, S.L. and Stulberg, D.S. and Davies, B. and Picard, F. and Leitner,
      F.},
      title = {Computer assisted knee replacement},
      journal = {Clinical orthopaedics and related research},
      year = {1998},
      volume = {354},
      pages = {49},
      keywords = {APP, OTS},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2011.01.12}
    }
  • C. Dick, J. Georgii, R. Burgkart, and R. Westermann, “Computational Steering for Patient-Specific Implant Planning in Orthopedics,” Orthopedics, 2008.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Dick2008,
      author = {Dick, Christian and Georgii, Joachim and Burgkart, Rainer and Westermann,
      R\"{u}diger},
      title = {Computational Steering for Patient-Specific Implant Planning in Orthopedics},
      journal = {Orthopedics},
      year = {2008},
      abstract = {Fast and reliablemethods for predicting andmonitoring in-vivo bone
      strength are of great importance for hip joint replacement. To avoid
      adaptive remodeling with cortical thinning and increased porosity
      of the bone due to stress shielding, in a preoperative planning process
      the optimal implant design, size, and position has to be determined.
      This process involves interactive implant positioning within the
      bone as well as simulation and visualization of the stress within
      bone and implant due to exerting forces. In this paper, we present
      a prototype of such a visual analysis tool, which, to our best knowledge,
      provides the first computational steering environment for optimal
      implant selection and positioning. This prototype considers patient-specific
      biomechanical properties of the bone to select the optimal implant
      design, size, and position according to the prediction of individual
      load transfer from the implant to the bone. We have developed a fast
      and stable multigrid finite-element solver for hexahedral elements,
      which enables interactive simulation of the stress distribution within
      the bone and the implant. By utilizing a real-time GPU-method to
      detect elements that are covered by the moving implant, we can automatically
      generate computational models from patient-specific CT scans in real-time,
      and we can instantly feed these models into the simulation process.
      Hardware-accelerated volume ray-casting, which is extended by a new
      method to accurately visualize sub-hexahedron implant boundaries,
      provides a new quality of orthopedic surgery planning.},
      file = {Dick2008.pdf:Dick2008.pdf:PDF},
      keywords = {GPU, OCS, OTS},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • a Digioiaiii, B. Jaramaz, C. Nikou, R. Labarca, J. Moody, and B. Colgan, “Surgical navigation for total hip replacement with the use of hipnav,” Operative Techniques in Orthopaedics, vol. 10, iss. 1, pp. 3-8, 2000.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Digioiaiii2000,
      author = {Digioiaiii, a and Jaramaz, B and Nikou, C and Labarca, R and Moody,
      J and Colgan, B},
      title = {Surgical navigation for total hip replacement with the use of hipnav},
      journal = {Operative Techniques in Orthopaedics},
      year = {2000},
      volume = {10},
      pages = {3-8},
      number = {1},
      month = {January},
      abstract = {HipNax; an image-guided surgical navigation system, is presented.
      The system was developed to measure and guide the placement of prosthetic
      components in total hip replacement surgery (THR), it incorporates
      a 3-dimensional preoperative planner with a simulator and an intraoperative
      surgical navigator. Coupling optimized preoperative planning with
      accurate surgical navigation will assist the surgeon in properly
      orienting the components, minimizing the risk of impingement and
      dislocation, lntraoperatively, the system uses image-guided tools
      to assist in accurate placement of the acetabular cup. The acetabular
      implant is placed in the planned position with the aid of a simple
      "aim-and-shoot" interface. The actual measurements of version and
      abduction are also provided. The use of this new class of operative
      sensors has been incorporated into a regular surgical routine. There
      are few additional steps necessary, therefore, for the image-guided
      procedure, which does not add significantly to the total time of
      surgery. We expect that these tools will lead to less invasive and
      more accurate THR surgery and directly relate patient outcomes to
      measured surgical practice.},
      file = {Digioiaiii2000.pdf:Digioiaiii2000.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {10486666},
      keywords = {3-dimensional planner,4 the leading,a significant clinical problem,after
      total hip replacement,dislocation continues to be,mechanisms of dislocation
      are,orientation,prosthetic impingement,simulation,surgery,surgical
      navigation,thr,total hip replacement, APP, PLA, GUI, OCS},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • M. R. DiSilvestro and J. T. Sherman, System and method for performing a computer assisted orthopaedic surgical procedureGoogle Patents, 2005.
    [Bibtex]
    @MISC{Disilvestro2005,
      author = {DiSilvestro, M.R. and Sherman, J.T.},
      title = {System and method for performing a computer assisted orthopaedic
      surgical procedure},
      month = {September},
      year = {2005},
      owner = {Thomas},
      publisher = {Google Patents},
      timestamp = {2011.02.03}
    }
  • B. T. Edwards, G. M. Gartsman, D. P. O’Connor, and V. K. Sarin, “Safety and utility of computer-aided shoulder arthroplasty,” Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, vol. 17, iss. 3, pp. 503-508, 2008.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Edwards2008,
      author = {T. Bradley Edwards and Gary M. Gartsman and Daniel P. O'Connor and
      Vineet K. Sarin},
      title = {Safety and utility of computer-aided shoulder arthroplasty},
      journal = {Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery},
      year = {2008},
      volume = {17},
      pages = {503 - 508},
      number = {3},
      abstract = {This study evaluated the safety and utility of a novel, image-free,
      shoulder navigation system in a cadaver and in an initial cohort
      of shoulder arthroplasty patients. Shoulder arthroplasty was performed
      on a cadaver and 27 patients using an image-free navigation system
      (NaviPro(TM); Kinamed Navigation Systems LLC, Camarillo, CA). Optical
      trackers were attached to the proximal humerus and the coracoid process.
      Prior to and following humeral head resection, the anatomic neck
      axis (retroversion, inclination) and humeral head diameter were measured
      with the navigation system. Native glenoid surface orientation was
      registered, and a navigation tracker was attached to the glenoid
      reamer. The navigation system recorded change in inclination and
      version relative to the native glenoid during reaming. The cadaver
      results demonstrated that the trackers did not impede surgical performance
      and that system accuracy was 2.6° ± 2.5°. In the clinical series,
      the navigation system reported the anatomic humeral neck measurements
      (retroversion 30.0° ± 16.0°; inclination 137.0° ± 11.7°), the humeral
      head diameters (major axis 46.2 mm ± 4.8 mm; minor axis 43.2 mm ±
      3.8 mm), the humeral neck resection angles (retroversion 29.9° ±
      15.1° and inclination 135.6° ± 9.1°), and glenoid reaming orientation
      relative to the native glenoid (+3.0° ± 6.3° of version; -6.7° ±
      4.4° of inclination). This initial clinical experience with computer-aided
      shoulder navigation demonstrates that the procedure is safe and can
      provide valuable intraoperative measurements. With an anatomic humeral
      implant system, the navigation system provides real-time feedback
      on the humeral resection as it relates to anatomic neck geometry.
      The system also provides real-time angulation of the glenoid reamer
      relative to preoperative glenoid deformity.},
      file = {Edwards2008.pdf:Edwards2008.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {1058-2746},
      keywords = {APP, OTS, GUI},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.12.22}
    }
  • M. Fleute, S. Lavallee, and R. Julliard, “Incorporating a statistically based shape model into a system for computer-assisted anterior cruciate ligament surgery.,” Medical Image Analysis, vol. 3, iss. 3, p. 209, 1999.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Fleute1999,
      author = {Fleute, M. and Lavallee, S. and Julliard, R.},
      title = {Incorporating a statistically based shape model into a system for
      computer-assisted anterior cruciate ligament surgery.},
      journal = {Medical Image Analysis},
      year = {1999},
      volume = {3},
      pages = {209},
      number = {3},
      file = {Fleute1999.pdf:Fleute1999.pdf:PDF},
      keywords = {IMP, TEC},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2011.01.12}
    }
  • P. Gamage, S. Q. Xie, P. Delmas, and P. Xu, “3D Reconstruction of Patient Specific Bone Models from 2D Radiographs for Image Guided Orthopedic Surgery,” in Digital Image Computing: Techniques and Applications, 2009. DICTA ’09., 2009, pp. 212-216.
    [Bibtex]
    @INPROCEEDINGS{Gamage2009b,
      author = {Gamage, P. and Xie, S.Q. and Delmas, P. and Xu, P.},
      title = {3D Reconstruction of Patient Specific Bone Models from 2D Radiographs
      for Image Guided Orthopedic Surgery},
      booktitle = {Digital Image Computing: Techniques and Applications, 2009. DICTA
      '09.},
      year = {2009},
      pages = {212 -216},
      month = {December},
      abstract = {Three dimensional (3D) visualization of anatomy plays an important
      role in image guided orthopedic surgery and ultimately motivates
      minimally invasive procedures. However, direct 3D imaging modalities
      such as Computed Tomography (CT) are restricted to a minority of
      complex orthopedic procedures. Thus the diagnostics and planning
      of many interventions still rely on two dimensional (2D) radiographic
      images, where the surgeon has to mentally visualize the anatomy of
      interest. The purpose of this paper is to apply and validate a bi-planar
      3D reconstruction methodology driven by prominent bony anatomy edges
      and contours identified on orthogonal radiographs. The results obtained
      through the proposed methodology are benchmarked against 3D CT scan
      data to assess the accuracy of reconstruction. The human femur has
      been used as the anatomy of interest throughout the paper. The novelty
      of this methodology is that it not only involves the outer contours
      of the bony anatomy in the reconstruction but also several key interior
      edges identifiable on radiographic images. Hence, this framework
      is not simply limited to long bones, but is generally applicable
      to a multitude of other bony anatomies as illustrated in the results
      section.},
      file = {:Gamage2009b.pdf:PDF},
      keywords = {2D radiographic images;3D bone reconstruction;biplanar 3D reconstruction
      methodology;bony anatomy edges;computed tomography;data visualisation;femur;image
      guided orthopedic surgery;patient specific bone models;bone;computerised
      tomography;data visualisation;edge detection;image reconstruction;medical
      image processing;orthopaedics;radiography;, TEC, OTS},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.11.02}
    }
  • P. Gamage, S. Q. Xie, P. Delmas, P. Xu, and S. Mukherjee, “Intra-operative 3D pose estimation of fractured bone segments for image guided orthopedic surgery,” 2008 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Biomimetics, pp. 288-293, 2009.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Gamage2009a,
      author = {Gamage, P. and Xie, S.Q. and Delmas, P. and Xu, P. and Mukherjee,
      S.},
      title = {Intra-operative 3D pose estimation of fractured bone segments for
      image guided orthopedic surgery},
      journal = {2008 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Biomimetics},
      year = {2009},
      pages = {288-293},
      month = {February},
      abstract = {The widespread adoption of minimally invasive surgical techniques
      have driven the need for 3D intra-operative image guidance. Hence
      the 3D pose estimation (position and orientation) performed through
      the registration of pre- operatively prepared 3D anatomical data
      to intra-operative 2D fluoroscopy images is one of the main research
      areas of image guided orthopedic surgery. The goal of this 2D-3D
      registration is to fuse highly detailed 3D information with the 2D
      images acquired intra-operatively to provide a real-time 3D visualization
      of the patient’s anatomy during surgery. Existing research work
      on fractured bone pose estimation focuses on tracking pre- operatively
      obtained 3D CT data through fiduciary markers implanted intra-operatively.
      This expensive and invasive approach is not routinely available for
      diagnostics, and a majority of fracture reduction procedures solely
      relies on x- ray/fluoroscopic images. The proposed concept eliminates
      the need to have the pre- operative CT scan of the patient’s injured
      anatomy and presents a non-invasive anatomy-based method for intra-operative
      pose estimation. The concept pre-operatively reconstructs a patient-
      specific fractured bone model utilizing two conventional x-ray images
      orthogonally (in anterior and lateral views) and a generic healthy
      3D anatomical model. This pre-operatively reconstructed 3D model
      will then be utilized intra-operatively in the novel 2D- 3D registration
      process for pose estimation. It is this registration process that
      is the focus of this paper. The registration is performed solely
      utilizing bony anatomical features extracted from fluoroscopic images
      without invasiveness external fiducial markers.},
      file = {:Gamage2009a.pdf:PDF},
      isbn = {978-1-4244-2678-2},
      keywords = {TEC, IMP},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      publisher = {Ieee},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • P. Gamage, S. Q. Xie, P. Delmas, and W. L. Xu, “Computer assisted 3D pre-operative planning tool for femur fracture orthopedic surgery,” Imaging, vol. 7625, p. 76253D-76253D–11, 2010.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Gamage2010,
      author = {Gamage, Pavan and Xie, Sheng Quan and Delmas, Patrice and Xu, Wei
      Liang},
      title = {Computer assisted 3D pre-operative planning tool for femur fracture
      orthopedic surgery},
      journal = {Imaging},
      year = {2010},
      volume = {7625},
      pages = {76253D-76253D--11},
      abstract = {Femur shaft fractures are caused by high impact injuries and can affect
      gait functionality if not treated correctly. Until recently, the
      pre-operative planning for femur fractures has relied on two-dimensional
      (2D) radiographs, light boxes, tracing paper, and transparent bone
      templates. The recent availability of digital radiographic equipment
      has to some extent improved the workflow for preoperative planning.
      Nevertheless, imaging is still in 2D X-rays and planning/simulation
      tools to support fragment manipulation and implant selection are
      still not available. Direct three- dimensional (3D) imaging modalities
      such as Computed Tomography (CT) are also still restricted to a minority
      of complex orthopedic procedures. This paper proposes a software
      tool which allows orthopedic surgeons to visualize, diagnose, plan
      and simulate femur shaft fracture reduction procedures in 3D. The
      tool utilizes frontal and lateral 2D radiographs to model the fracture
      surface, separate a generic bone into the two fractured fragments,
      identify the pose of each fragment, and automatically customize the
      shape of the bone. The use of 3D imaging allows full spatial inspection
      of the fracture providing different views through the manipulation
      of the interactively reconstructed 3D model, and ultimately better
      pre-operative planning.},
      file = {Gamage2010.pdf:Gamage2010.pdf:PDF},
      keywords = {computer assisted interventions,femur fracture surgery planning,image
      guided surgery, APP, PLA, OCS, PRS, SLR, SUR},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • H. Handels and J. Ehrhardt, “Simulation of hip operations and design of custom-made endoprostheses using virtual reality techniques,” , 2001.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Handels2001b,
      author = {Handels, H. and Ehrhardt, J.},
      title = {Simulation of hip operations and design of custom-made endoprostheses
      using virtual reality techniques},
      year = {2001},
      file = {Handels2001b.pdf:Handels2001b.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0026-1270},
      keywords = {APP, OTS, PLA, SLR, SUR},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2011.01.12}
    }
  • M. Harders, A. Barlit, C. Gerber, J. Hodler, and G. Sz, “An Optimized Surgical Planning Environment for Complex Proximal Humerus Fractures,” , 2007.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Harders2007,
      author = {Harders, M and Barlit, A and Gerber, Ch and Hodler, J and Sz, G},
      title = {An Optimized Surgical Planning Environment for Complex Proximal Humerus
      Fractures},
      year = {2007},
      abstract = {The precise restoration of a joint’s mobility after fractures can
      only be successful, if the original anatomical relationships are
      repro- duced as closely as possible. Precise estimates about the
      morphology of the bony components are therefore of paramount importance
      both for reconstructive surgery by ostheosynthesis as well as for
      partial or total joint replacement by arthroplasty. In case of the
      shoulder joint, only the proper reassembly of the fragments provides
      sufficient information about the original anatomical relationships
      of a fractured humerus, due to high individual variability and lateral
      asymmetry. To support the precise plan- ning of the interventions,
      this paper presents an enhanced environment facilitating both underlying
      processing steps: fragment segmentation and bone reassembly. This
      includes an intuitive interface for correcting pre- processed volumetric
      CT data as well as a visuo-haptic, virtual envi- ronment for physically-based
      simulation of interactive reassembly. The planning system has been
      successfully tested in a pilot study on four clinical cases.},
      file = {Harders2007.pdf:Harders2007.pdf:PDF},
      keywords = {APP, PLA, OTS, SUR},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • A. Hodgson, “Computer-Assisted Orthopedic Surgery,” in Image-Guided Interventions, T. Peters and K. Cleary, Eds., Springer US, 2008, pp. 333-386.
    [Bibtex]
    @INCOLLECTION{Hodgson2008,
      author = {Hodgson, Antony},
      title = {Computer-Assisted Orthopedic Surgery},
      booktitle = {Image-Guided Interventions},
      publisher = {Springer US},
      year = {2008},
      editor = {Peters, Terry and Cleary, Kevin},
      pages = {333 - 386},
      note = {Contents},
      abstract = {Orthopedic surgeons treat musculoskeletal disorders such as arthritis,
      scoliosis, and trauma, which collectively affect hundreds of millions
      of people and are the leading cause of pain and disability. In this
      chapter, the main technical developments related to computer-assisted
      surgery (CAS) in several key areas of orthopedic surgery are reviewed:
      hip and knee replacements, spine surgery, and fracture repair. We
      also assess the evaluations of these systems performed to date, with
      a particular focus on the value proposition that CAS needs to deliver
      in order for it to become widely accepted. This means it must demonstrate
      better performance, less operating room time, and reduced costs.
      We describe several systems for both hip and knee replacement that
      are based on computed tomographic (CT) images, intraoperative fluoroscopy,
      or image-free kinematic techniques, and in each domain consider both
      manual and robotic systems. Future work in computer-assisted orthopedic
      surgery will include efforts to develop newer technologies such as
      3D ultrasound and ever less invasive procedures, but it must also
      concentrate on improving operative workflow, to transfer the benefits
      of improved accuracy to nonspecialist orthopedic surgeons working
      in community hospitals, where the case volumes are lower than in
      specialized centers. Linkages between improved accuracy during surgery
      and improved functional outcomes for the patients must be demonstrated
      for these technologies to be widely accepted.},
      affiliation = {Centre for Hip Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver,
      BC Canada},
      file = {Hodgson2008.pdf:Hodgson2008.pdf:PDF},
      isbn = {978-0-387-73858-1},
      keyword = {Engineering},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2011.01.11}
    }
  • R. Hofstetter, M. Slomczykowski, I. Bourquin, and L. Nolte, “Fluoroscopy based surgical navigation-concept and clinical applications,” , pp. 956-960, 1997.
    [Bibtex]
    @CONFERENCE{Hofstetter1997,
      author = {Hofstetter, R. and Slomczykowski, M. and Bourquin, I. and Nolte,
      LP},
      title = {Fluoroscopy based surgical navigation-concept and clinical applications},
      booktitle = {Computer Assisted Radiology and Surgery},
      year = {1997},
      pages = {956 - 960},
      file = {Hofstetter1997.pdf:Hofstetter1997.pdf:PDF},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2011.01.18}
    }
  • L. Joskowicz, L. Tockus, Z. Yaniv, A. Simkin, and C. Milgrom, “Computer-aided image-guided bone fracture surgery: concept and implementation,” Computer Aided Surgery, vol. 3, iss. 6, pp. 271-288, 1998.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Joskowicz1998,
      author = {Joskowicz, L. and Tockus, L. and Yaniv, Z. and Simkin, A. and Milgrom,
      C.},
      title = {Computer-aided image-guided bone fracture surgery: concept and implementation},
      journal = {Computer Aided Surgery},
      year = {1998},
      volume = {3},
      pages = {271 - 288},
      number = {6},
      file = {Joskowicz1998.pdf:Joskowicz1998.pdf:PDF},
      keywords = {APP, PLA, OTS, SUR},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2011.01.18}
    }
  • W. H. Kluge, “Computer assisted hip resurfacing,” Orthopaedics and Trauma, vol. 23, iss. 3, pp. 210-215, 2009.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Kluge2009,
      author = {Wolfram H. Kluge},
      title = {Computer assisted hip resurfacing},
      journal = {Orthopaedics and Trauma},
      year = {2009},
      volume = {23},
      pages = {210 - 215},
      number = {3},
      abstract = {Hip resurfacing has generally favourable results. Complications such
      as femoral neck fracture and implant loosening are often related
      to surgical technique. Recent published results suggest that the
      revision rate for hip resurfacing could be reduced by accurate implant
      positioning. This article is a review of the characteristics of computer
      assisted navigation systems which aim to achieve best possible alignment
      of the femoral head surface replacement in relation to the individual
      head-neck axis.},
      file = {Kluge2009.pdf:Kluge2009.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {1877-1327},
      keywords = {computer assistance, APP, GUI, SUR, OTS},
      owner = {Thomas},
      timestamp = {2011.02.07}
    }
  • M. Krokos, D. Podgorelec, G. J. Clapworthy, R. H. Liang, D. Testi, and M. Viceconti, “Patient-specific muscle models for surgical planning,” in Medical Information Visualisation – Biomedical Visualisation, 2005. (MediVis 2005). Proceedings. Third International COnference on, 2005, pp. 3-8.
    [Bibtex]
    @INPROCEEDINGS{Krokos2005,
      author = {Krokos, M. and Podgorelec, D. and Clapworthy, G.J. and Liang, R.H.
      and Testi, D. and Viceconti, M.},
      title = {Patient-specific muscle models for surgical planning},
      booktitle = {Medical Information Visualisation - Biomedical Visualisation, 2005.
      (MediVis 2005). Proceedings. Third International COnference on},
      year = {2005},
      pages = { 3 - 8},
      month = {July},
      abstract = {In the Multisense project, several sensorial devices (haptics, speech,
      visualisation and tracking) are integrated within a virtual reality
      environment for planning total hip replacement (THR) surgery. In
      use, a fundamental requirement is the creation of a complete subject-specific
      model of the lower limb. For THR surgery, the available data is from
      computed tomography (CT) only. Although CT scans allow accurate extraction
      of bones and the skin surface, muscles appear as poorly contrasted
      structures. The challenge is, thus, to produce an intuitive modelling
      tool that will support interactive deformation of a generic atlas
      model into a patient-specific model. For this, we first generate
      synthetic scans along pre-defined slicing axes in patient space.
      Muscle outlines obtained by an initial mapping of generic atlas models
      are then superimposed on these slices. These outlines are deformed
      by simple geometric operations to match the underlying muscle shapes
      using a novel software tool, the Muscle Modelling Laboratory (MML).
      The paper presents a shape investigation of the muscles relevant
      to THR surgery and describes the MML module in operation.},
      file = {Krokos2005.pdf:Krokos2005.pdf:PDF},
      keywords = { Multisense project; Muscle Modelling Laboratory; bones; computed
      tomography; generic atlas model; medical visualisation; patient-specific
      model; patient-specific muscle models; pre-defined slicing axes;
      skin surface; total hip replacement surgical planning; virtual reality
      environment; bone; computerised tomography; data visualisation; medical
      computing; muscle; physiological models; skin; surgery; virtual reality;},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2011.01.18}
    }
  • Y. W. Kwon, K. a Powell, J. K. Yum, J. J. Brems, and J. P. Iannotti, “Use of three-dimensional computed tomography for the analysis of the glenoid anatomy.,” Journal of shoulder and elbow surgery / American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons … [et al.], vol. 14, iss. 1, pp. 85-90, 1990.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Kwon1990,
      author = {Kwon, Young W and Powell, Kimerly a and Yum, Jae Kwang and Brems,
      John J and Iannotti, Joseph P},
      title = {Use of three-dimensional computed tomography for the analysis of
      the glenoid anatomy.},
      journal = {Journal of shoulder and elbow surgery / American Shoulder and Elbow
      Surgeons ... [et al.]},
      year = {1990},
      volume = {14},
      pages = {85-90},
      number = {1},
      abstract = {Preoperative evaluation for a total shoulder arthroplasty includes
      2-dimensional analysis of the glenoid through either standard radiographs
      or computed tomography (CT) images. Recent evidence suggests that
      these 2-dimensional images may actually misrepresent the 3-dimensional
      (3D) anatomy of the glenoid. Because 3D reconstructions of CT images
      allow 3D visualization and analysis of the scapula as a free body,
      we hypothesized that they can reflect the true anatomy of the glenoid
      more accurately. To test this hypothesis, we obtained various glenoid
      morphometric measurements from excised cadaveric scapulae as well
      as their respective 3D CT images. On average, the glenoid version
      angles measured from the 3D CT images were within 1.0 degrees +/-
      0.7 degrees (mean +/- SD) of those from the actual specimen (95\%
      confidence limit, <2.2 degrees for all observers). These measurements
      from the 3D CT images showed high interobserver and intraobserver
      reliability (interobserver and intraobserver correlation coefficients,
      0.983 and 0.978, respectively). Similarly, measured glenoid surface
      width and length from the 3D CT images were within 1.8 +/- 1.2 mm
      and 1.4 +/- 1.1 mm, respectively, of those from the actual specimen.
      In addition, we were able to estimate the glenoid surface area as
      well as the glenoid vault volume from the 3D CT images. These values
      were 8.67 +/- 2.73 cm2 and 11.86 +/- 5.06 cm3, respectively. The
      mean glenoid vault volume with respect to its surface area was 1.35
      +/- 0.24 cm3/cm2 (range, 1.06-1.91 cm3/cm2). These data suggest that
      3D CT images can accurately reflect the true anatomy of the glenoid
      and that they can provide valuable information regarding the glenoid
      surface and vault. As such, 3D CT images may prove to be a useful
      tool during the preoperative evaluation for a total shoulder arthroplasty,
      particularly in patients with significant glenoid bone loss.},
      file = {Kwon1990.pdf:Kwon1990.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {1058-2746},
      keywords = {Anthropometry,Cadaver,Humans,Imaging, Three-Dimensional,Observer Variation,Shoulder
      Joint,Shoulder Joint: anatomy \& histology,Shoulder Joint: radiography,Tomography,
      X-Ray Computed},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      pmid = {15723018},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • F. Langlotz, R. Bächler, U. Berlemann, L. P. Nolte, and R. Ganz, “Computer assistance for pelvic osteotomies,” Clinical orthopaedics and related research, vol. 354, p. 92, 1998.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Langlotz1998,
      author = {Langlotz, F. and Bächler, R. and Berlemann, U. and Nolte, L.P. and
      Ganz, R.},
      title = {Computer assistance for pelvic osteotomies},
      journal = {Clinical orthopaedics and related research},
      year = {1998},
      volume = {354},
      pages = {92},
      abstract = {To assist surgeons performing pelvic osteotomies for the treatment
      of dysplastic hips, an image guided freehand navigation system has
      been developed. Preoperative computed tomographic scan images are
      presented in various ways to the surgeon together with real time
      display of the instruments and surgical action on the computer screen.
      The system supports the preoperative plan and provides optimized
      control of surgical action. The main focus of the image guidance
      has been placed on the execution of the different required cuts and
      the reorientation of the acetabular fragment. Special attention also
      has been given to the development of a sophisticated surgeon-machine
      interface. Fourteen surgeries have been performed with image guidance
      so far. The visualization aids provided by the system are able to
      help reduce potential risk and thus increase safety and accuracy
      for this difficult class of surgical interventions.},
      keywords = {APP, OTS, GUI, PLA},
      owner = {Thomas},
      timestamp = {2011.02.03}
    }
  • R. Lattanzi, M. Viceconti, M. Petrone, P. Quadrani, and C. Zannoni, “Applications of 3D medical imaging in orthopaedic surgery:introducing the hip-op system,” Proceedings. First International Symposium on 3D Data Processing Visualization and Transmission, pp. 808-811, 2002.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Lattanzi2002,
      author = {Lattanzi, R. and Viceconti, M. and Petrone, M. and Quadrani, P. and
      Zannoni, C.},
      title = {Applications of 3D medical imaging in orthopaedic surgery:introducing
      the hip-op system},
      journal = {Proceedings. First International Symposium on 3D Data Processing
      Visualization and Transmission},
      year = {2002},
      pages = {808-811},
      abstract = {Computer Aided Surgery (CAS) systems help surgeons in planning the
      operation accurately, resulting in costs reducing, clinical outcome
      improving and enhancing of the health care delivery efficiency. This
      paper describes the Hip-Op system, which is a novel software for
      the preoperative planning of total hip replacement. The software
      uses a fully three-dimensional (3D) internal representation of the
      patient anatomy, derived from Computed Tomography data. The user
      interface is based on an innovative visualization paradigm, called
      Multimodal Display, and represents the anatomical objects by means
      of multiple views, which are familiar to medical professionals. Besides
      the original CT slices, also two synthetically generated radiographs
      are available, as well as a surface rendering view. The surgeon can
      load prosthetic models into the planning software environment, selecting
      them from those available in the implant database. Then he can perform
      a virtual surgery procedure in order to plan the proper position
      and orientation of the prosthesis within the host femur. Analysis
      modules allow to evaluate the planning from a biomechanical point
      of view.},
      file = {Lattanzi2002.pdf:Lattanzi2002.pdf:PDF},
      isbn = {0-7695-1521-5},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      publisher = {IEEE Comput. Soc},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • T. Leenders, D. Vandevelde, G. Mahieu, and R. Nuyts, “Reduction in variability of acetabular cup abduction using computer assisted surgery: a prospective and randomized study,” Computer Aided Surgery, vol. 7, iss. 2, pp. 99-106, 2002.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Leenders2002,
      author = {Leenders, T. and Vandevelde, D. and Mahieu, G. and Nuyts, R.},
      title = {Reduction in variability of acetabular cup abduction using computer
      assisted surgery: a prospective and randomized study},
      journal = {Computer Aided Surgery},
      year = {2002},
      volume = {7},
      pages = {99 - 106},
      number = {2},
      file = {Leenders2002.pdf:Leenders2002.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {1097 - 0150},
      owner = {Thomas},
      publisher = {Wiley Online Library},
      timestamp = {2011.02.03}
    }
  • U. C. Liener, C. Reinhart, L. Kinzl, and F. Gebhard, “A new approach to computer guidance in orthopedic surgery using real time volume rendering.,” Journal of medical systems, vol. 23, iss. 1, pp. 35-40, 1999.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Liener1999,
      author = {Liener, U C and Reinhart, C and Kinzl, L and Gebhard, F},
      title = {A new approach to computer guidance in orthopedic surgery using real
      time volume rendering.},
      journal = {Journal of medical systems},
      year = {1999},
      volume = {23},
      pages = {35-40},
      number = {1},
      month = {February},
      abstract = {The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the ability of a new real
      time volume rendering system using raw unprocessed CT data on a four
      processor Pentium PC. A CT data set of the pelvic area was used to
      demonstrate the systems ability to integrate and visualize both data
      from a CT scan and a tracking system. The computer system consisted
      of a four processor Pentium PC and the software tool VGInsight (Volume
      Graphics GmbH). For study purposes in a laboratory setting a magnetic
      tracking system (Polemus Inc.) was used to simulate tracked surgical
      tools. With this new software tool and the tracking system the exact
      relative location of a tracked instrument within all structures of
      the pelvic area, soft tissue as well as bone, could be displayed
      in 3D and real time without preprocessing of the data set. Until
      recently real time volume rendering required expensive workstations.
      With a new software tool on a four processor Pentium PC the authors
      were able to introduce a 3D real time processed data supply to the
      surgeon.},
      file = {Liener1999.pdf:Liener1999.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0148-5598},
      keywords = {Fractures, Bone,Fractures, Bone: diagnosis,Fractures, Bone: surgery,Humans,Image
      Processing, Computer-Assisted,Magnetic Resonance Imaging,Microcomputers,Orthopedic
      Procedures,Orthopedic Procedures: instrumentation,Orthopedic Procedures:
      trends,Pelvis,Pelvis: injuries,Pelvis: surgery,Technology Assessment,
      Biomedical,Therapy, Computer-Assisted,Tomography, X-Ray Computed,
      APP, GUI, VOR, OTS},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      pmid = {10321378},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • B. Ma and R. E. Ellis, “Robust registration for computer-integrated orthopedic surgery: laboratory validation and clinical experience.,” Medical image analysis, vol. 7, iss. 3, pp. 237-50, 2003.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Ma2003,
      author = {Ma, B and Ellis, R E},
      title = {Robust registration for computer-integrated orthopedic surgery: laboratory
      validation and clinical experience.},
      journal = {Medical image analysis},
      year = {2003},
      volume = {7},
      pages = {237-50},
      number = {3},
      month = {September},
      abstract = {In order to provide navigational guidance during computer-integrated
      orthopedic surgery, the anatomy of the patient must first be registered
      to a medical image or model. A common registration approach is to
      digitize points from the surface of a bone and then find the rigid
      transformation that best matches the points to the model by constrained
      optimization. Many optimization criteria, including a least-squares
      objective function, perform poorly if the data include spurious data
      points (outliers). This paper describes a statistically robust, surface-based
      registration algorithm that we have developed for orthopedic surgery.
      To find an initial estimate, the user digitizes points from predefined
      regions of bone that are large enough to reliably locate even in
      the absence of anatomic landmarks. Outliers are automatically detected
      and managed by integrating a statistically robust M-estimator with
      the iterative-closest-point algorithm. Our in vitro validation method
      simulated the registration process by drawing registration data points
      from several sets of densely digitized surface points. The method
      has been used clinically in computer-integrated surgery for high
      tibial osteotomy, distal radius osteotomy, and excision of osteoid
      osteoma.},
      file = {Ma2003.pdf:Ma2003.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {1361-8415},
      keywords = {Adolescent,Adult,Algorithms,Bone Neoplasms,Bone Neoplasms: radiography,Bone
      Neoplasms: surgery,Femur,Femur: radiography,Humans,Image Interpretation,
      Computer-Assisted,Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted: instrumen,Image
      Interpretation, Computer-Assisted: methods,Imaging, Three-Dimensional,Imaging,
      Three-Dimensional: instrumentation,Imaging, Three-Dimensional: methods,Lumbar
      Vertebrae,Lumbar Vertebrae: radiography,Osteoma, Osteoid,Osteoma,
      Osteoid: radiography,Osteoma, Osteoid: surgery,Osteotomy,Osteotomy:
      methods,Pattern Recognition, Automated,Phantoms, Imaging,Radius Fractures,Radius
      Fractures: radiography,Radius Fractures: surgery,Reproducibility
      of Results,Sensitivity and Specificity,Subtraction Technique,Surgery,
      Computer-Assisted,Surgery, Computer-Assisted: methods,Tibia,Tibia:
      injuries,Tibia: radiography,Tibial Fractures,Tibial Fractures: radiography,Tibial
      Fractures: surgery,Tomography, X-Ray Computed,Tomography, X-Ray Computed:
      methods, TEC},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      pmid = {12946466},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • X. Ma, X. Wu, J. Liu, Y. Wu, and L. Sun, “Novel 3D Reconstruction Modeling Contributes to Development of Orthopaedic Surgical Interventions,” Biomedical Engineering, pp. 8-11, 2010.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Ma2010b,
      author = {Ma, Xing and Wu, Xiaoming and Liu, Jian and Wu, Yaoping and Sun,
      Long},
      title = {Novel 3D Reconstruction Modeling Contributes to Development of Orthopaedic
      Surgical Interventions},
      journal = {Biomedical Engineering},
      year = {2010},
      pages = {8-11},
      abstract = {Radiology plays important roles in orthopaedic surgery. Although various
      conventional radiological assessments including digital X-rays, magnetic
      resonance imaging (MRI), computerized tomography (CT) and the three-dimensional
      (3D) CT reconstruction images have been widely developed and utilized
      for preoperative assessment and planning, there are limitations.
      For example, despite the advances in 3D digital reconstruction images,
      the 3D structure, anatomy and damaged situation are still being inspected
      in a separate and flat manner (i.e. paper, film, etc.). Therefore
      the requirement of real 3D models for bone and joint has emerged
      clinically. In the present study, a CAD based 3D visualization system
      and a rapid prototyping (RP) technique were used to fabricate 3D
      physical models of highly difficult fractures and severe deformities
      in skeleton comminuted including severe pelvic/acetabular fractures,
      proximal humeral fractures, talar/ankle joint fractures, scoliolosis
      and progressive deformities in extremity. Applications and benefits
      of the biomedical visualization-based orthopaedic surgical strategies
      were elucidated. Keywords-bone and joint; injury; modeling;},
      file = {Ma2010b.pdf:Ma2010b.pdf:PDF},
      keywords = {-bone and joint,Novel 3D Reconstruction Modeling Contributes to De,department
      of biomedical engineering,injury,jian liu 2,long sun 2,modeling,rapid
      prototyping,rp,surgical intervention,xiaoming wu 1,yaoping wu 2},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • M. Marcacci, L. Nofrini, F. Iacono, A. Di Martino, S. Bignozzi, and M. Lo Presti, “A novel computer-assisted surgical technique for revision total knee arthroplasty.,” Computers in biology and medicine, vol. 37, iss. 12, pp. 1771-9, 2007.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Marcacci2007,
      author = {Marcacci, Maurilio and Nofrini, Laura and Iacono, Francesco and {Di
      Martino}, Alessandro and Bignozzi, Simone and {Lo Presti}, Mirco},
      title = {A novel computer-assisted surgical technique for revision total knee
      arthroplasty.},
      journal = {Computers in biology and medicine},
      year = {2007},
      volume = {37},
      pages = {1771-9},
      number = {12},
      month = {December},
      abstract = {Revision total knee arthroplasty (RTKA) is a skill-demanding intervention
      presenting several technical challenges to the surgeon due to bone
      deficiencies and lack of anatomical references. Computer-assisted
      navigation systems can potentially solve these problems. An innovative
      computer-assisted surgical technique for RTKA is presented. The system
      is image free. Based on anatomical landmarks acquired on the patient,
      the system automatically plans the intervention, and provides the
      surgeon with tools to analyse and modify the proposed plan and to
      accurately reproduce it on the patient. Although we performed few
      cases with this navigated procedure, early results obtained demonstrated
      to be very promising.},
      file = {Marcacci2007.pdf:Marcacci2007.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0010-4825},
      keywords = {Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee,Humans,Surgery, Computer-Assisted},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      pmid = {17618998},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • N. Maurel, a Diop, and J. Grimberg, “A 3D finite element model of an implanted scapula: importance of a multiparametric validation using experimental data.,” Journal of biomechanics, vol. 38, iss. 9, pp. 1865-72, 2005.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Maurel2005,
      author = {Maurel, N and Diop, a and Grimberg, J},
      title = {A 3D finite element model of an implanted scapula: importance of
      a multiparametric validation using experimental data.},
      journal = {Journal of biomechanics},
      year = {2005},
      volume = {38},
      pages = {1865-72},
      number = {9},
      month = {September},
      abstract = {In order to help to understand the loosening phenomenon around gleno\"{\i}d
      prostheses, a 3D finite element model of a previously tested implanted
      scapula has been developed. The construction of the model was done
      using CT scans of the tested scapula. Different bone material properties
      were tested and shell elements or 8 nodes hexaedric elements were
      used to model the cortical bone. Surface contact elements were introduced
      on one hand between the bone and the lower part of the plate of the
      implant, and on the other, between the loading metallic ball and
      the upper surface of the implant. The results of the model were compared
      with those issued from in vitro experiments carried out on the same
      scapula. The evaluation of the model was done for nine cases of loading
      of 500 N distributed on the implant, in terms of strains (principal
      strains of six spots around peripheral cortex of the gleno\"{\i}d)
      and displacement of four points positioned on the implant. The best
      configuration of the model presented here, fits with experiments
      for most of the strains (difference lower than 150microdef) but it
      seems to be still too stiff (mainly in the lower part). Nevertheless,
      we want, in this paper, to underline the importance of doing a multiparametric
      validation for such a model. Indeed, some models can give correct
      results for one case of loading but bad results for another kind
      of loading, some others can give good results for one kind of compared
      parameters (like strains for instance) but bad results for the other
      one (like displacements).},
      file = {Maurel2005.pdf:Maurel2005.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0021-9290},
      keywords = {Aged,Aged, 80 and over,Computer Simulation,Diagnosis, Computer-Assisted,Diagnosis,
      Computer-Assisted: methods,Elasticity,Equipment Failure Analysis,Equipment
      Failure Analysis: methods,Finite Element Analysis,Humans,Imaging,
      Three-Dimensional,Imaging, Three-Dimensional: methods,Joint Prosthesis,Male,Models,
      Biological,Prosthesis Failure,Prosthesis Fitting,Prosthesis Fitting:
      methods,Radiographic Image Interpretation, Computer-Assist,Risk Assessment,Risk
      Assessment: methods,Risk Factors,Scapula,Scapula: physiopathology,Scapula:
      radiography,Scapula: surgery,Stress, Mechanical,Weight-Bearing, OCS,
      TEC},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      pmid = {16023474},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • P. Merloz, J. Tonetti, L. Pittet, M. Coulomb, S. Lavallee, and P. Sautot, “Pedicle screw placement using image guided techniques,” Clinical orthopaedics and related research, vol. 354, p. 39, 1998.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Merloz1998,
      author = {Merloz, P. and Tonetti, J. and Pittet, L. and Coulomb, M. and Lavallee,
      S. and Sautot, P.},
      title = {Pedicle screw placement using image guided techniques},
      journal = {Clinical orthopaedics and related research},
      year = {1998},
      volume = {354},
      pages = {39},
      keywords = {TRM},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2011.01.18}
    }
  • M. Nakamoto, “Automated CT-based 3D surgical planning for total hip replacement: a pilot study,” International Congress Series, vol. 1256, pp. 389-394, 2003.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Nakamoto2003,
      author = {Nakamoto, M},
      title = {Automated CT-based 3D surgical planning for total hip replacement:
      a pilot study},
      journal = {International Congress Series},
      year = {2003},
      volume = {1256},
      pages = {389-394},
      month = {June},
      abstract = {At the preoperative planning stage of CT-based computer-assisted total
      hip replacement, a surgeon determines the parameters such as size,
      position, and orientations of the implants based on interactive visualization
      of 3D models of the implants and hip joint bone. However, the parameters
      depend on surgeon’s visual assessment of spatial relationship between
      the hip joint bone and implants. Our objective is to investigate
      objective criteria for determination of the optimal parameters and
      formulate an automated determination procedure based on the criteria.
      We objectified expertise in the preoperative planning of an experienced
      surgeon into quantitative evaluations and geometrical constraints,
      then formulated the automated procedure as an optimization problem.
      The automated planning system was applied to three cases of patient
      data sets and compared with an experienced surgeon. In the preliminary
      results, the planning parameters determined by the system were generally
      acceptable as a pilot experiment.},
      file = {Nakamoto2003.pdf:Nakamoto2003.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {05315131},
      keywords = {TEC},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • L. P. Nolte and R. Ganz, Computer assisted orthopedic surgery (CAOS), Hogrefe & Huber, 1999.
    [Bibtex]
    @BOOK{Nolte1999,
      title = {Computer assisted orthopedic surgery (CAOS)},
      publisher = {Hogrefe \& Huber},
      year = {1999},
      author = {Nolte, L.P. and Ganz, R.},
      isbn = {0889371687},
      keywords = {OTS},
      owner = {Thomas},
      timestamp = {2011.02.03}
    }
  • L-P. Nolte, L. Zamorano, H. Visarius, U. Berlemann, F. Langlotz, E. Arm, and O. Schwarzenbach, “Clinical evaluation of a system for precision enhancement in spine surgery,” Clinical Biomechanics, vol. 10, iss. 6, pp. 293-303, 1995.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Nolte1995,
      author = {L-P Nolte and L Zamorano and H Visarius and U Berlemann and F Langlotz
      and E Arm and O Schwarzenbach},
      title = {Clinical evaluation of a system for precision enhancement in spine
      surgery},
      journal = {Clinical Biomechanics},
      year = {1995},
      volume = {10},
      pages = {293 - 303},
      number = {6},
      abstract = {Most techniques in segmental spinal fixation surgery rely on the identification
      of predefined targets with the help of anatomical landmarks and on
      intraoperative use of image intensifiers. However, because there
      is no direct link between the image information, the accessible spinal
      anatomy, and the action of surgical instruments several potential
      problems and possible complications are still involved. A novel system
      for spinal surgery has been designed allowing for the real-time,
      intraoperative localization of surgical instruments in medical images.
      In practice this was achieved by combining image-guided stereotaxis
      with advanced optoelectronic position sensing techniques. Modules
      were developed for image data processing, surgical planning and simulation,
      and various intraoperative procedures. A detailed validation of the
      system was performed indicating an overall accuracy to be better
      than the slice distance of the spinal image used. In an in-vitro
      setting 20 pilot holes for pedicle screws were prepared in human
      cadaveric lumbar spines. An analysis in 77 histological cuts showed
      an ideal location in 70 and only minor cortex engagement in seven
      sections. In vivo the system has been successfully applied in three
      posterior low lumbar stabilizations with overall 15 transpedicular
      screws.},
      file = {Nolte1995.pdf:Nolte1995.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0268-0033},
      keywords = {Spine surgery, TEC},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2011.01.17}
    }
  • H. M. Overhoff and M. Engineering, “Computer Assisted Orthopaedic Surgery,” International Journal of Computer Assisted Radiology and Surgery, vol. 1, iss. S1, pp. 229-250, 2006.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Overhoff2006,
      author = {Overhoff, H M and Engineering, Medical},
      title = {Computer Assisted Orthopaedic Surgery},
      journal = {International Journal of Computer Assisted Radiology and Surgery},
      year = {2006},
      volume = {1},
      pages = {229-250},
      number = {S1},
      month = {June},
      file = {Overhoff2006.pdf:Overhoff2006.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {1861-6410},
      keywords = {3d ultrasound \ae shoulder,endoprosthesis \ae,navigated implantation,
      APP, OTS, OCS},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • C. Paggetti, S. Martelli, L. Nofrini, and P. Vendruscolo, “Interface Design and Evaluation for CAS Systems,” in Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention – MICCAI 2001, W. Niessen and M. Viergever, Eds., Springer Berlin / Heidelberg, 2001, vol. 2208, pp. 1099-1106.
    [Bibtex]
    @INCOLLECTION{Paggetti2001,
      author = {Paggetti, Cristiano and Martelli, Sandra and Nofrini, Laura and Vendruscolo,
      Paolo},
      title = {Interface Design and Evaluation for CAS Systems},
      booktitle = {Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention – MICCAI
      2001},
      publisher = {Springer Berlin / Heidelberg},
      year = {2001},
      editor = {Niessen, Wiro and Viergever, Max},
      volume = {2208},
      series = {Lecture Notes in Computer Science},
      pages = {1099 - 1106},
      abstract = {The use of Computer Assisted Surgery (CAS) systems is becoming very
      common in the clinical practice, therefore the evaluation of such
      systems in terms of clinical outcomes and ergonomic features is more
      and more relevant. This paper goals has been to define some domain
      specific guidelines for the design of Human Computer Interfaces (HCI)
      for surgical application and to provide an evaluation protocol of
      existing CAS systems. The demonstration application has been a planning
      system developed for the Total Knee Replacement (TKR), a high skill
      demanding procedure, where the planning phase is crucial for the
      success of the intervention. The results we have obtained can be
      extended also to surgical training systems and surgical navigation
      platforms.},
      affiliation = {MEDEA — MEDical and Engineering Applications, Firenze, Italy},
      file = {Paggetti2001.pdf:Paggetti2001.pdf:PDF},
      owner = {Thomas},
      timestamp = {2011.03.09},
      url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/3-540-45468-3_131}
    }
  • P. Peters, F. Langlotz, and L. -P. Nolte, “Computer assisted screw insertion into real 3D rapid prototyping pelvis models,” Clinical Biomechanics, vol. 17, iss. 5, pp. 376-382, 2002.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Peters2002,
      author = {P. Peters and F. Langlotz and L. -P. Nolte},
      title = {Computer assisted screw insertion into real 3D rapid prototyping
      pelvis models},
      journal = {Clinical Biomechanics},
      year = {2002},
      volume = {17},
      pages = {376 - 382},
      number = {5},
      file = {Peters2002.pdf:Peters2002.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0268-0033},
      keywords = {Rapid prototyping, TEC, RPP},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2011.01.17}
    }
  • P. Potamianos, a a Amis, J. a Forester, M. McGurk, and M. Bircher, “Rapid prototyping for orthopaedic surgery.,” Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers. Part H, Journal of engineering in medicine, vol. 212, iss. 5, pp. 383-93, 1998.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Potamianos1998,
      author = {Potamianos, P and Amis, a a and Forester, a J and McGurk, M and Bircher,
      M},
      title = {Rapid prototyping for orthopaedic surgery.},
      journal = {Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers. Part H, Journal
      of engineering in medicine},
      year = {1998},
      volume = {212},
      pages = {383-93},
      number = {5},
      month = {January},
      abstract = {The revision of an orthopaedic procedure can present surgeons with
      the challenge of a complex reconstructive process. Orthopaedic surgery
      can also face considerable challenges in cases presenting extensive
      primary injuries with multiple bone fragmentation, as well as in
      cases presenting bone deformities. Radiographs are used routinely
      for orthopaedic surgical planning, yet they provide inadequate information
      on the precise three-dimensional extent of bone defects. Three-dimensional
      reconstructions from X-ray computed tomography offer superior visualization
      but are not portable for consultation or readily available in the
      operating theatre for guidance during a procedure. A physical model
      manufactured from X-ray computed tomography data can offer surgeons
      a clear understanding of complex anatomical detail, by providing
      an intuitive physical relationship between patient and model. Rapid
      prototyping was used for the construction of an anatomical model
      in a case presenting with a complex shoulder injury. The model provided
      a definitive interpretation of joint pathology and enabled a full
      assessment of the degree of injury.},
      file = {Potamianos1998.pdf:Potamianos1998.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0954-4119},
      keywords = {Adult,Clavicle,Clavicle: injuries,Computer Simulation,Computer-Aided
      Design,Female,Fractures, Bone,Fractures, Bone: radiography,Fractures,
      Bone: surgery,Humans,Models, Anatomic,Orthopedic Procedures,Scapula,Scapula:
      injuries, TEC, RPP, OTS},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      pmid = {9803157},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • P. Pott, S. Heute, P. Weiser, A. Wagner, E. Badreddin, M. Schwarz, and E. Orthopaedics, “Computer Assistd Orthopaedic Surgery,” International Journal of Computer Assisted Radiology and Surgery, vol. 4, iss. S1, pp. 97-105, 2009.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Pott2009,
      author = {Pott, P and Heute, S and Weiser, P and Wagner, A and Badreddin, E
      and Schwarz, M and Orthopaedics, Experimental},
      title = {Computer Assistd Orthopaedic Surgery},
      journal = {International Journal of Computer Assisted Radiology and Surgery},
      year = {2009},
      volume = {4},
      pages = {97 - 105},
      number = {S1},
      month = {April},
      file = {Pott2009.pdf:Pott2009.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {1861-6410},
      keywords = {orthopaedic surgery a epizactor,workspace-to-volume ratio,hybrid kinematics},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.10.25}
    }
  • J. Qin, W. Pang, Y. Chui, T. Wong, and P. Heng, “A Novel Modeling Framework for Multilayered Soft Tissue Deformation in Virtual Orthopedic Surgery,” Journal of Medical Systems, vol. 34, pp. 261-271, 2010.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Qin2010a,
      author = {Qin, Jing and Pang, Wai-Man and Chui, Yim-Pan and Wong, Tien-Tsin
      and Heng, Pheng-Ann},
      title = {A Novel Modeling Framework for Multilayered Soft Tissue Deformation
      in Virtual Orthopedic Surgery},
      journal = {Journal of Medical Systems},
      year = {2010},
      volume = {34},
      pages = {261-271},
      abstract = {Realistic modeling of soft tissue deformation is crucial to virtual
      orthopedic surgery, especially orthopedic trauma surgery which involves
      layered heterogeneous soft tissues. In this paper, a novel modeling
      framework for multilayered soft tissue deformation is proposed in
      order to facilitate the development of orthopedic surgery simulators.
      We construct our deformable model according to the layered structure
      of real human organs, and this results in a multilayered model. The
      division of layers is based on the segmented Chinese Visible Human
      (CVH) dataset. This enhances the realism and accuracy in the simulation.
      For the sake of efficiency, we employ 3D mass-spring system to our
      multilayered model. The nonlinear passive biomechanical properties
      of skin and skeletal muscle are achieved by introducing a bilinear
      elasticity scheme to the springs in the mass-spring system. To efficiently
      and accurately reproduce the biomechanical properties of certain
      human tissues, an optimization approach is employed in configuring
      the parameters of the springs. Experimental data from biomechanics
      literatures are used as benchmarking references. With the employment
      of Physics Processing Unit (PPU) and high quality volume visualization,
      our framework is developed into an interactive and intuitive platform
      for virtual surgery training systems. Several experiments demonstrate
      the feasibility of the proposed framework in providing interactive
      and realistic deformation for orthopedic surgery simulation.},
      affiliation = {The Chinese University of Hong Kong Department of Computer Science
      and Engineering Shatin N. T. Hong Kong},
      file = {Qin2010a.pdf:Qin2010a.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0148-5598},
      issue = {3},
      keyword = {Medicine},
      keywords = {TEC},
      owner = {Thomas},
      publisher = {Springer Netherlands},
      timestamp = {2011.02.14}
    }
  • K. Radermacher, H. Staudte, and G. Rau, “Computer assisted matching of planning and execution orthopedic surgery,” , vol. 15, pp. 946-949, 1993.
    [Bibtex]
    @CONFERENCE{Radermacher1993,
      author = {Radermacher, K. and Staudte, HW and Rau, G.},
      title = {Computer assisted matching of planning and execution orthopedic surgery},
      booktitle = {PROC ANNU CONF ENG MED BIOL, IEEE, PISCATAWAY, NJ,(USA), 1993,},
      year = {1993},
      volume = {15},
      pages = {946 - 949},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.10.26}
    }
  • M. Richter, Minimally Invasive Surgery in Orthopedics, Springer Science + Business, 2010.
    [Bibtex]
    @BOOK{Richter2010,
      title = {Minimally Invasive Surgery in Orthopedics},
      publisher = {Springer Science + Business},
      year = {2010},
      author = {M. Richter},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.10.25}
    }
  • J. T. Sherman, M. R. DiSilvestro, and T. L. Dietz, Method and apparatus for performing a voice-assisted orthopaedic surgical procedureGoogle Patents, 2005.
    [Bibtex]
    @MISC{Sherman2005a,
      author = {Sherman, J.T. and DiSilvestro, M.R. and Dietz, T.L.},
      title = {Method and apparatus for performing a voice-assisted orthopaedic
      surgical procedure},
      month = {March},
      year = {2005},
      owner = {Thomas},
      publisher = {Google Patents},
      timestamp = {2011.02.03}
    }
  • J. T. Sherman, M. R. DiSilvestro, and R. S. Popovic, Apparatus and method for registering a bone of a patient with a computer assisted orthopaedic surgery systemGoogle Patents, 2005.
    [Bibtex]
    @MISC{Sherman2005b,
      author = {Sherman, J.T. and DiSilvestro, M.R. and Popovic, R.S.},
      title = {Apparatus and method for registering a bone of a patient with a computer
      assisted orthopaedic surgery system},
      month = {December},
      year = {2005},
      owner = {Thomas},
      publisher = {Google Patents},
      timestamp = {2011.02.03}
    }
  • D. A. Simon, B. Jaramaz, M. Blackwell, F. Morgan, A. M. Digioia, E. Kischell, B. Colgan, and T. Kanade, “Development and Validation of a Navigational Guidance System for Acetabular Implant Placement,” , 1997.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Simon1997,
      author = {Simon, D A and Jaramaz, B and Blackwell, M and Morgan, F and Digioia,
      A M and Kischell, E and Colgan, B and Kanade, T},
      title = {Development and Validation of a Navigational Guidance System for
      Acetabular Implant Placement},
      year = {1997},
      abstract = {During the past year our group has been developing HipNav, a system
      which helps surgeons determine optimal, patient-specific acetabular
      implant placement and accurately achieve the desired implant placement
      during surgery. HipNav includes three components: a pre-operative
      planner, a range of motion simulator, and an intra-operative tracking
      and guidance system. The goals of the current HipNav system are to:
      1) reduce dislocations following total hip replace- ment surgery
      due to acetabular malposition; 2) determine and potentially increase
      the "safe" range of motion; 3) reduce wear debris resulting from
      impingement of the implant's femoral neck with the acetabular rim;
      and 4) track in real-time the position of the pelvis and acetabulum
      during surgery. The original implementation of the HipNav system
      was a proof-of-concept pro- totype which was useful for demonstrating
      the efficacy of this technology in-vit- ro. As the HipNav system
      progressed towards a clinical implementation, our efforts focussed
      on several practical development and validation issues. This pa-
      per describes our experience transforming HipNav from a proof-of-concept
      pro- totype into a robust clinical system, with emphasis on technical
      development and validation. Despite the highly applied nature of
      this endeavor, many fundamental research issues exist. The benefits
      of tightly coupling fundamental research to- gether with applied
      development in our work are discussed.},
      file = {Simon1997.pdf:Simon1997.pdf:PDF},
      keywords = {ance,computer-assisted surgery,navigational guid-,system validation,total
      hip replacement, APP, OTS, PLA, GUI, SUR},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.10.26}
    }
  • E. Stindel, J. Briard, P. Merloz, S. Plaweski, F. Dubrana, C. Lefevre, and J. Troccaz, “Bone morphing: 3D morphological data for total knee arthroplasty,” Computer Aided Surgery, vol. 7, iss. 3, pp. 156-168, 2002.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Stindel2002,
      author = {Stindel, E. and Briard, JL and Merloz, P. and Plaweski, S. and Dubrana,
      F. and Lefevre, C. and Troccaz, J.},
      title = {Bone morphing: 3D morphological data for total knee arthroplasty},
      journal = {Computer Aided Surgery},
      year = {2002},
      volume = {7},
      pages = {156 - 168},
      number = {3},
      file = {Stindel2002.pdf:Stindel2002.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {1097-0150},
      keywords = {TEC, OTS},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      publisher = {Wiley Online Library},
      timestamp = {2011.01.12}
    }
  • S. D. Stulberg, F. Picard, and D. Saragaglia, “Computer-assisted total knee replacement arthroplasty,” Operative Techniques in Orthopaedics, vol. 10, iss. 1, pp. 25-39, 2000.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Stulberg2000,
      author = {Stulberg, S.D. and Picard, F. and Saragaglia, D.},
      title = {Computer-assisted total knee replacement arthroplasty},
      journal = {Operative Techniques in Orthopaedics},
      year = {2000},
      volume = {10},
      pages = {25 - 39},
      number = {1},
      file = {Stulberg2000.pdf:Stulberg2000.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {1048-6666},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      publisher = {Elsevier},
      timestamp = {2011.01.13}
    }
  • K. Subburaj and B. Ravi, “High resolution medical models and geometric reasoning starting from CT/MR images,” , pp. 441-444, 2007.
    [Bibtex]
    @CONFERENCE{Subburaj2007,
      author = {Subburaj, K. and Ravi, B.},
      title = {High resolution medical models and geometric reasoning starting from
      CT/MR images},
      booktitle = {Computer-Aided Design and Computer Graphics, 2007 10th IEEE International
      Conference on},
      year = {2007},
      pages = {441 - 444},
      organization = {IEEE},
      file = {Subburaj2007.pdf:Subburaj2007.pdf:PDF},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2011.01.17}
    }
  • K. Subburaj, B. Ravi, and M. Agarwal, “Computer-aided methods for assessing lower limb deformities in orthopaedic surgery planning.,” Computerized medical imaging and graphics : the official journal of the Computerized Medical Imaging Society, vol. 34, iss. 4, pp. 277-88, 2010.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Subburaj2010,
      author = {Subburaj, K and Ravi, B and Agarwal, Manish},
      title = {Computer-aided methods for assessing lower limb deformities in orthopaedic
      surgery planning.},
      journal = {Computerized medical imaging and graphics : the official journal
      of the Computerized Medical Imaging Society},
      year = {2010},
      volume = {34},
      pages = {277 - 88},
      number = {4},
      month = {June},
      abstract = {Accurate, simple, and quick measurement of anatomical deformities
      at preoperative stage is clinically important for decision making
      in surgery planning. The deformities include excessive torsional,
      angular, and curvature deformation. This paper presents computer-aided
      methods for automatically measuring anatomical deformities of long
      bones of the lower limb. A three-dimensional bone model reconstructed
      from CT scan data of the patient is used as input. Anatomical landmarks
      on femur and tibia bone models are automatically identified using
      geometric algorithms. Medial axes of femur and tibia bones, and anatomical
      landmarks are used to generate functional and reference axes. These
      methods have been implemented in a software program and tested on
      a set of CT scan data. Overall, the performance of the computerized
      methodology was better or similar to the manual method and its results
      were reproducible.},
      file = {Subburaj2010.pdf:Subburaj2010.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {1879-0771},
      keywords = {Computer Simulation,Femur,Femur: abnormalities,Femur: radiography,Femur:
      surgery,Humans,Image Enhancement,Image Enhancement: methods,Imaging,
      Three-Dimensional,Imaging, Three-Dimensional: methods,Models, Anatomic,Models,
      Biological,Orthopedics,Orthopedics: methods,Preoperative Care,Preoperative
      Care: methods,Prognosis,Radiographic Image Interpretation, Computer-Assist,Surgery,
      Computer-Assisted,Surgery, Computer-Assisted: methods,Tibia,Tibia:
      abnormalities,Tibia: radiography,Tibia: surgery,Tomography, X-Ray
      Computed,Tomography, X-Ray Computed: methods, TEC, OTS},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      pmid = {19963346},
      publisher = {Elsevier Ltd},
      timestamp = {2010.10.25}
    }
  • K. Subburaj, B. Ravi, and M. G. Agarwal, “Automated 3D geometric reasoning in Computer Assisted joint reconstructive surgery,” 2009 IEEE International Conference on Automation Science and Engineering, pp. 367-372, 2009.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Subburaj2009a,
      author = {Subburaj, K. and Ravi, B. and Agarwal, M. G.},
      title = {Automated 3D geometric reasoning in Computer Assisted joint reconstructive
      surgery},
      journal = {2009 IEEE International Conference on Automation Science and Engineering},
      year = {2009},
      pages = {367 - 372},
      month = {August},
      abstract = {—Computer Assisted Orthopedic Surgery (CAOS) employing information
      and computer graphics technologies for preoperative planning, intraoperative
      navigation, and for guiding or performing surgical interventions,
      has received very little attention for bone tumor surgery applications.
      We have developed a CAOS system called OrthoSYS, driven by geometric
      reasoning algorithms to visualize tumor size, shape, and plan for
      resection according to the tumor’s spread, starting from a 3D model
      reconstructed from CT images. Anatomical landmarks on bone are automatically
      identified and labeled, useful for registering patient model with
      virtual model during surgery and also as a reference for tumor resection
      and prosthesis positioning. The thickness of bone stock remaining
      after tumor resection is automatically analyzed to choose the best
      modular stem and fix the prosthesis. A method for prosthesis components
      selection using fuzzy logic has been developed to assist the surgeons.
      The medial axis of the long bones and anatomical landmarks are used
      for positioning the prosthesis in virtual planning and verification
      in the intra- operative stage. A set of anatomical metrics have been
      developed to measure the effectiveness of the prosthetic replacement
      of bone. I.},
      file = {Subburaj2009a.pdf:Subburaj2009a.pdf:PDF},
      isbn = {978-1-4244-4578-3},
      keywords = {TEC, OTS},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      publisher = {Ieee},
      timestamp = {2010.10.25}
    }
  • N. Sugano, “Computer-assisted orthopedic surgery.,” Journal of orthopaedic science : official journal of the Japanese Orthopaedic Association, vol. 8, iss. 3, pp. 442-8, 2003.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Sugano2003,
      author = {Sugano, Nobuhiko},
      title = {Computer-assisted orthopedic surgery.},
      journal = {Journal of orthopaedic science : official journal of the Japanese
      Orthopaedic Association},
      year = {2003},
      volume = {8},
      pages = {442 - 8},
      number = {3},
      month = {January},
      abstract = {Computer-assisted surgery (CAS) utilizing robotic or image-guided
      technologies has been introduced into various orthopedic fields.
      Navigation and robotic systems are the most advanced parts of CAS,
      and their range of functions and applications is increasing. Surgical
      navigation is a visualization system that gives positional information
      about surgical tools or implants relative to a target organ (bone)
      on a computer display. There are three types of surgical planning
      that involve navigation systems. One makes use of volumetric images,
      such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, or ultrasound
      echograms. Another makes use of intraoperative fluoroscopic images.
      The last type makes use of kinetic information about joints or morphometric
      information about the target bones obtained intraoperatively. Systems
      that involve these planning methods are called volumetric image-based
      navigation, fluoroscopic navigation, and imageless navigation, respectively.
      To overcome the inaccuracy of hand-controlled positioning of surgical
      tools, three robotic systems have been developed. One type directs
      a cutting guide block or a drilling guide sleeve, with surgeons sliding
      a bone saw or a drill bit through the guide instrument to execute
      a surgical action. Another type constrains the range of movement
      of a surgical tool held by a robot arm such as ACROBOT. The last
      type is an active system, such as ROBODOC or CASPAR, which directs
      a milling device automatically according to preoperative planning.
      These CAS systems, their potential, and their limitations are reviewed
      here. Future technologies and future directions of CAS that will
      help provide improved patient outcomes in a cost-effective manner
      are also discussed.},
      file = {Sugano2003.pdf:Sugano2003.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0949-2658},
      keywords = {Cost Savings,Humans,Orthopedic Procedures,Orthopedic Procedures: economics,Orthopedic
      Procedures: methods,Robotics,Surgery, Computer-Assisted,Surgery,
      Computer-Assisted: economics},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      pmid = {12768493},
      timestamp = {2010.10.25}
    }
  • M. Viceconti, A. Chiarini, D. Testi, F. Taddei, B. Bordini, F. Traina, and A. Toni, “New aspects and approaches in pre-operative planning of hip reconstruction: a computer simulation,” Langenbeck’s Archives of Surgery, vol. 389, iss. 5, pp. 400-404, 2004.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Viceconti2004,
      author = {Viceconti, M. and Chiarini, A. and Testi, D. and Taddei, F. and Bordini,
      B. and Traina, F. and Toni, A.},
      title = {New aspects and approaches in pre-operative planning of hip reconstruction:
      a computer simulation},
      journal = {Langenbeck's Archives of Surgery},
      year = {2004},
      volume = {389},
      pages = {400 - 404},
      number = {5},
      file = {Viceconti2004.pdf:Viceconti2004.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {1435-2443},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      publisher = {Springer},
      timestamp = {2011.01.12}
    }
  • M. Viceconti, R. Lattanzi, B. Antonietti, S. Paderni, R. Olmi, A. Sudanese, and A. Toni, “CT-based surgical planning software improves the accuracy of total hip replacement preoperative planning.,” Medical engineering & physics, vol. 25, iss. 5, p. 371, 2003.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Viceconti2003,
      author = {Viceconti, M. and Lattanzi, R. and Antonietti, B. and Paderni, S.
      and Olmi, R. and Sudanese, A. and Toni, A.},
      title = {CT-based surgical planning software improves the accuracy of total
      hip replacement preoperative planning.},
      journal = {Medical engineering \& physics},
      year = {2003},
      volume = {25},
      pages = {371},
      number = {5},
      owner = {Thomas},
      timestamp = {2011.02.03}
    }
  • M. Viceconti, R. Lattanzi, C. Zannoni, and A. Cappello, “Effect of display modality on spatial accuracy of orthopaedic surgery pre-operative planning applications,” Informatics for Health and Social Care, vol. 27, iss. 1, pp. 21-32, 2002.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Viceconti2002,
      author = {Viceconti, M. and Lattanzi, R. and Zannoni, C. and Cappello, A.},
      title = {Effect of display modality on spatial accuracy of orthopaedic surgery
      pre-operative planning applications},
      journal = {Informatics for Health and Social Care},
      year = {2002},
      volume = {27},
      pages = {21 - 32},
      number = {1},
      file = {Viceconti2002.pdf:Viceconti2002.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {1463-9238},
      keywords = {APP, OTS, PLA, SLR, SUR},
      owner = {Thomas},
      publisher = {Informa UK Ltd UK},
      timestamp = {2011.02.03}
    }
  • K. Wong, S. Kumta, K. Leung, K. Ng, E. Ng, and K. Lee, “Integration of CAD/CAM planning into computer assisted orthopaedic surgery,” Computer Aided Surgery, pp. 1-10, 2010.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Wong2010,
      author = {Wong, KC and Kumta, SM and Leung, KS and Ng, KW and Ng, EWK and Lee,
      KS},
      title = {Integration of CAD/CAM planning into computer assisted orthopaedic
      surgery},
      journal = {Computer Aided Surgery},
      year = {2010},
      pages = {1 - 10},
      number = {0},
      issn = {1092-9088},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      publisher = {Informa UK Ltd UK},
      timestamp = {2011.01.12}
    }

Reviews

  • H. Bathis, L. Perlick, M. Tingart, C. Luring, D. Zurakowski, and J. Grifka, “Alignment in total knee arthroplasty,” The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, vol. 86, iss. 5, pp. 682-687, 2004.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Bathis2004,
      author = {Bathis, H. and Perlick, L. and Tingart, M. and Luring, C. and Zurakowski,
      D. and Grifka, J.},
      title = {Alignment in total knee arthroplasty},
      journal = {The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery},
      year = {2004},
      volume = {86},
      pages = {682 - 687},
      number = {5},
      month = {July},
      abstract = {Restoration of neutral alignment of the leg is an important factor
      affecting the long-term results of total knee arthroplasty (TKA).
      Recent developments in computer-assisted surgery have focused on
      systems for improving TKA. In a prospective study two groups of 80
      patients undergoing TKA had operations using either a computer-assisted
      navigation system or a conventional technique. Alignment of the leg
      and the orientation of components were determined on post-operative
      long-leg coronal and lateral films. The mechanical axis of the leg
      was significantly better in the computer-assisted group (96\%, within
      ±3˚ varus/valgus) compared with the conventional group (78\%, within
      ±3˚ varus/valgus). The coronal alignment of the femoral component
      was also more accurate in the computer-assisted group. Computer-assisted
      TKA gives a better correction of alignment of the leg and orientation
      of the components compared with the conventional technique. Potential
      benefits in the long-term outcome and functional improvement require
      further investigation.},
      file = {Bathis2004.pdf:Bathis2004.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0301620X},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • E. Demomi, E. Pavan, B. Motyl, C. Bandera, and C. Frigo, “Hip joint anatomy virtual and stereolithographic reconstruction for preoperative planning of total hip replacement,” International Congress Series, vol. 1281, pp. 708-712, 2005.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Demomi2005,
      author = {Demomi, E and Pavan, E and Motyl, B and Bandera, C and Frigo, C},
      title = {Hip joint anatomy virtual and stereolithographic reconstruction for
      preoperative planning of total hip replacement},
      journal = {International Congress Series},
      year = {2005},
      volume = {1281},
      pages = {708-712},
      month = {May},
      abstract = {The purpose of the present work was to develop a tool for preoperatively
      planning the Total Hip Replacement (THR). Starting from the MR images,
      the 3D surface model of both the pelvis and the femur was built and
      the surgical operation was virtually performed. Data coming from
      gait analysis were added to visualize the physiologic movement of
      the hip joint. The resulting triangular mesh was sufficiently accurate
      to allow the building of the stereolithographic model of the joint
      by means of rapid prototyping technique. The plastic bones allow
      the user to have an enhanced vision of the surgical procedure to
      be performed.},
      file = {Demomi2005.pdf:Demomi2005.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {05315131},
      keywords = {magnetic resonance imaging,rapid prototyping,surgical planning,total
      hip replacement, APP, PLA, OTS, SUR, RPP},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • R. Ellis, “From scans to sutures: computer-assisted orthopedic surgery in the twenty-first century.,” Conference proceedings : … Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. Conference, vol. 7, pp. 7234-7, 2005.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Ellis2005,
      author = {Ellis, R},
      title = {From scans to sutures: computer-assisted orthopedic surgery in the
      twenty-first century.},
      journal = {Conference proceedings : ... Annual International Conference of the
      IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. IEEE Engineering
      in Medicine and Biology Society. Conference},
      year = {2005},
      volume = {7},
      pages = {7234-7},
      month = {January},
      abstract = {Computer-assisted surgery is the process of using medical images,
      such as CT scans, X-ray fluoroscopy, or 3D ultrasound, to improve
      patient care. A typical surgical procedure begins by acquiring and
      processing a CT scan with specially developed image-analysis software.
      A surgeon then performs a "virtual surgery" on the patient to develop
      a preoperative plan. In the operating room the medical image is registered
      to the patient's anatomy by finding an optimal rigid-body transformation.
      This transformation allows an object or motion in one coordinate
      frame to be represented in the other frame, and thus a surgeon can
      visualize the location of an instrument deep within concealed anatomy
      while avoiding structures at risk. The operating surgeon can also
      use computer-tracked fluoroscopy or ultrasound for 3D guidance. For
      the past seven years, our interdisciplinary research group has been
      investigating fundamental problems in orthopedic surgery of bones
      and joints. This paper is an overview of the problems and solutions
      that have been tested in a set of pilot clinical trials in which
      we have treated more than 250 patients for early or advanced arthritis,
      poorly healed bone fractures, and treatment of deep bone tumors.},
      file = {Ellis2005.pdf:Ellis2005.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {1557-170X},
      keywords = {REV, OTS},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      pmid = {17281949},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • W. Glinkowski, “Computer Enhanced Orthopedics,” Information Technologies in Biomedicine, pp. 28-43, 2008.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Glinkowski2008,
      author = {Glinkowski, W.},
      title = {Computer Enhanced Orthopedics},
      journal = {Information Technologies in Biomedicine},
      year = {2008},
      pages = {28 - 43},
      file = {Glinkowski2008.pdf:Glinkowski2008.pdf:PDF},
      keywords = {REV, OTS},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      publisher = {Springer},
      timestamp = {2011.01.11}
    }
  • D. Kendoff, M. Citak, T. Hüfner, S. Chaudhary, and C. Krettek, “Current concepts and applications of computer navigation in orthopedic trauma surgery,” Central European Journal of Medicine, vol. 2, pp. 392-403, 2007.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Kendoff2007,
      author = {Kendoff, D. and Citak, M. and Hüfner, T. and Chaudhary, S. and Krettek,
      C.},
      title = {Current concepts and applications of computer navigation in orthopedic
      trauma surgery},
      journal = {Central European Journal of Medicine},
      year = {2007},
      volume = {2},
      pages = {392 - 403},
      abstract = {Navigation has become widely integrated into regular endoprosthetic
      procedures, but clinical use of navigation systems in orthopaedic
      trauma has only been implemented in a few indications. Navigation
      systems enable an accuracy of 1 mm or 1 degree. Navigation can achieve
      higher precision when it is combined with different imaging modalities,
      including preoperative computer tomography (CT), intraoperative CT,
      two-dimensional fluoroscopy, and, recently, intraoperative three-dimensional
      fluoroscopy. The precision of the navigation system can be influenced
      by the surgeon as well as by the camera system, type of reference
      marker, and the registration process. Recent developments in orthopedic
      trauma navigation allow for bilateral femoral anteversion measurements,
      noninvasive registration of an uninjured thigh, and intraoperative
      three-dimensional fluoroscopy-based pedicle screw placement. Although
      the use of navigation has provided initial positive results in trauma
      care, prospective clinical studies remain to be performed.},
      affiliation = {Hannover Medical School Trauma Department 30625 Germany},
      file = {Kendoff2007.pdf:Kendoff2007.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {1895-1058},
      issue = {4},
      keyword = {Medicine},
      owner = {Thomas},
      publisher = {Versita, co-published with Springer-Verlag GmbH},
      timestamp = {2011.02.03}
    }
  • J. Kowal, F. Langlotz, and L. Nolte, “Basics of Computer-Assisted Orthopaedic Surgery,” , 2007.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Kowal2007,
      author = {Kowal, J and Langlotz, F and Nolte, L},
      title = {Basics of Computer-Assisted Orthopaedic Surgery},
      year = {2007},
      file = {Kowal2007.pdf:Kowal2007.pdf:PDF},
      keywords = {REV, OTS},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • F. Langlotz, “State-of-the-art in orthopaedic surgical navigation with a focus on medical image modalities,” The Journal of Visualization and Computer Animation, vol. 13, iss. 1, pp. 77-83, 2002.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Langlotz2002,
      author = {Langlotz, Frank},
      title = {State-of-the-art in orthopaedic surgical navigation with a focus
      on medical image modalities},
      journal = {The Journal of Visualization and Computer Animation},
      year = {2002},
      volume = {13},
      pages = {77 - 83},
      number = {1},
      month = {February},
      abstract = {This paper presents a review of surgical navigation systems in orthopaedics
      and categorizes these systems according to the image modalities that
      are used for the visualization of surgical action. Medical images
      used to be an essential part of surgical education and documentation
      as well as diagnosis and operation planning over many years. With
      the recent introduction of navigation techniques in orthopaedic surgery,
      a new field of application has been opened. Today surgical navigation
      systems — also known as image-guided surgery systems — are available
      for various applications in orthopaedic surgery. They visualize the
      position and orientation of surgical instruments as graphical overlays
      onto a medical image of the operated anatomy on a computer monitor.
      Preoperative image data such as computed tomography scans or intraoperatively
      generated images (for example, ultrasonic, endoscopic or fluoroscopic
      images) are suitable for this purpose. A new category of medical
      images termed ‘surgeon-defined anatomy’ has been developed that
      exclusively relies upon the usage of navigation technology. Points
      on the anatomy are digitized interactively by the surgeon and are
      used to build up an abstract geometrical model of the bony structures
      to be operated on. This},
      file = {Langlotz2002.pdf:Langlotz2002.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {1049-8907},
      keywords = {computer-assisted surgery,image guidance,intraoperative navigation,registration,
      REV},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • F. Langlotz and L. Nolte, “Technical Approaches to Computer-Assisted Orthopedic Surgery,” European Journal of Trauma, vol. 30, iss. 1, pp. 1-11, 2004.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Langlotz2004,
      author = {Langlotz, Frank and Nolte, Lutz-Peter},
      title = {Technical Approaches to Computer-Assisted Orthopedic Surgery},
      journal = {European Journal of Trauma},
      year = {2004},
      volume = {30},
      pages = {1-11},
      number = {1},
      month = {February},
      abstract = {Surgical navigation systems and medical robotic devices are increasingly
      being used during trauma and orthopedic surgery. This article tries
      to present the underlying technology of these devices and to describe
      different approaches to the various aspects of the methods. To structure
      the variety of available products and presented research modules,
      a new categorization for these approaches is proposed. Examples of
      pre- or intraoperative imaging modalities, of trackers for navi-
      gation systems, of different surgical robots, and of methods for
      registration as well as referencing are dis- cussed. Many applications
      that have been realized for numerous surgical procedures will be
      presented and their advantages, disadvantages, and possible implica-
      tions will be elucidated.},
      file = {Langlotz2004.pdf:Langlotz2004.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {1439-0590},
      keywords = {categories of,navigation,registration,robotics, REV, OTS},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • D. Nguyen, L. M. Ferreira, J. R. Brownhill, K. J. Faber, and J. A. Johnson, “Design and development of a computer assisted glenoid implantation technique for shoulder replacement surgery,” Computer Aided Surgery, vol. 12, iss. 3, pp. 152-159, 2007.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Nguyen2007,
      author = {Nguyen, D. and Ferreira, L.M. and Brownhill, J.R. and Faber, K.J.
      and Johnson, J.A.},
      title = {Design and development of a computer assisted glenoid implantation
      technique for shoulder replacement surgery},
      journal = {Computer Aided Surgery},
      year = {2007},
      volume = {12},
      pages = {152 - 159},
      number = {3},
      issn = {1092-9088},
      keywords = {APP, OTS, PLA},
      publisher = {Informa UK Ltd UK}
    }
  • C. Nikou, A. Digioiaiii, M. Blackwell, B. Jaramaz, and T. Kanade, “Augmented reality imaging technology for orthopaedic surgery,” Operative Techniques in Orthopaedics, vol. 10, iss. 1, pp. 82-86, 2000.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Nikou2000,
      author = {Nikou, C and Digioiaiii, A and Blackwell, M and Jaramaz, B and Kanade,
      T},
      title = {Augmented reality imaging technology for orthopaedic surgery},
      journal = {Operative Techniques in Orthopaedics},
      year = {2000},
      volume = {10},
      pages = {82-86},
      number = {1},
      month = {January},
      abstract = {{Augmented or hybrid reality is a display technique that combines
      the real world with the virtual world; it permits digital images
      or preoperative planning information to be combined with the surgeon's
      view of the real world. This technique gives surgeons "x-ray vision"
      without the use of ionizing radiation, allowing them to visualize
      parts of the patient's anatomy that are not typically exposed during
      a surgical procedure. Augmented reality can increase the surgeon's
      view of unexposed bones and other tissues during surgery while using
      less invasive techniques. These visualization devices will also allow
      the surgeon to view preoperatively determined locations of incisions
      and real-time medical images with proper spatial alignment during
      surgery. Augmented reality will eventually enable less invasive and
      minimally invasive surgical techniques that are not technologically
      feasible at this time. In this article, the augmented reality technique
      is described and illustrated, showing examples of already existing
      medical systems that use this display technolog\}: Possible orthopaedic
      applications of augmented reality are presented as well as current
      research and practical issues associated with making augmented reality
      a commonplace tool in surgical practice.},
      file = {Nikou2000.pdf:Nikou2000.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {10486666},
      keywords = {and ar-,augmented reality,before the advent of,could,fluoroscopy,imaging
      technologies,magnetic resonance imaging,mri,such as,surgical visualization,throscopy,virtual
      reality,visualization during orthopaedic surgery, TEC},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
    
    }
  • J. Traub, T. Sielhorst, S. Heining, and N. Navab, “Advanced Display and Visualization Concepts for Image Guided Surgery,” Computer Aided Surgery, vol. 4, iss. 4, pp. 483-490, 2008.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Traub2008,
      author = {Traub, Joerg and Sielhorst, Tobias and Heining, Sandro-michael and
      Navab, Nassir},
      title = {Advanced Display and Visualization Concepts for Image Guided Surgery},
      journal = {Computer Aided Surgery},
      year = {2008},
      volume = {4},
      pages = {483 - 490},
      number = {4},
      abstract = {Thanks to its rapid development in the last decades, image guided
      surgery (IGS) has been introduced successfully in many modern operating
      rooms. Current IGS systems provide their navigation information on
      a standard computer monitor. Alter- natively, one could enhance the
      direct sight of the physician by an overlay of the virtual data onto
      the real patient view. Such in situ visualization methods have been
      proposed in the literature for pro- viding a more intuitive visualization,
      improving the ergonomics as well as the hand-eye coordination. In
      this paper,we first discuss the fundamental issues and the recent
      endeavors in advanced display and visualization for IGS.We then present
      some of our recentwork comparing two navigation systems: 1) a classical
      monitor based navigation and 2) a new navigation system we had developed
      based on in situ visualization. As both solutions reveal shortcomings
      as well as complementary advantages, we introduce a new solution
      that combines both concepts into one hybrid user interface. Finally,
      experimental results report on the performance of several surgeons
      using an external monitor as well as a stereo video see-through head-mounted
      display (HMD). The experiments consist of drilling into a phantom
      in order to reach planted deep-seated targets only visible inComputedTomography(CT)data.We
      evaluate several vi- sualization techniques, including thenewhybridsolution,andstudy
      their influence on the performance of the participant surgeons.},
      file = {Traub2008.pdf:Traub2008.pdf:PDF},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.10.26}
    }
  • Y. Weil, R. Mosheiff, L. Joskowicz, and M. Liebergall, “Principles of Computer-Aided Surgery in Trauma Surgery,” in Navigation and MIS in Orthopedic Surgery, J. B. Stiehl, W. H. Konermann, R. G. Haaker, and A. M. DiGioia, Eds., Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2007, pp. 476-485.
    [Bibtex]
    @INCOLLECTION{Weil2007,
      author = {Weil, Y. and Mosheiff, R. and Joskowicz, L. and Liebergall, M.},
      title = {Principles of Computer-Aided Surgery in Trauma Surgery},
      booktitle = {Navigation and MIS in Orthopedic Surgery},
      publisher = {Springer Berlin Heidelberg},
      year = {2007},
      editor = {Stiehl, James B. and Konermann, Werner H. and Haaker, Rolf G. and
      DiGioia, Anthony M.},
      pages = {476 - 485},
      affiliation = {Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical School, Jerusalem Department of
      Orthopaedic Surgery POB 12000 Jerusalem 91120 Israel},
      file = {Weil2007.pdf:Weil2007.pdf:PDF},
      isbn = {978-3-540-36691-1},
      keyword = {Medicine &amp; Public Health},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2011.01.18}
    }

 

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