Cranio-maxillofacial Surgery

References

  • E. Keeve, S. Girod, and B. Girod, “Craniofacial surgery simulation,” , pp. 541-546, 1996.
    [Bibtex]
    @CONFERENCE{Keeve1996a,
      author = {Keeve, E. and Girod, S. and Girod, B.},
      title = {Craniofacial surgery simulation},
      booktitle = {Visualization in Biomedical Computing},
      year = {1996},
      pages = {541 - 546},
      organization = {Springer},
      crossref = {rmer},
      file = {Keeve1996a.pdf:Keeve1996a.pdf:PDF},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2011.01.25}
    }
  • D. E. Altobelli, R. Kikinis, J. B. Mulliken, H. Cline, W. Lorensen, F. Jolesz, and others, “Computer-assisted three-dimensional planning in craniofacial surgery,” Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, vol. 92, iss. 4, p. 576, 1993.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Altobelli1993,
      author = {Altobelli, D.E. and Kikinis, R. and Mulliken, J.B. and Cline, H.
      and Lorensen, W. and Jolesz, F. and others},
      title = {Computer-assisted three-dimensional planning in craniofacial surgery},
      journal = {Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery},
      year = {1993},
      volume = {92},
      pages = {576},
      number = {4},
      issn = {0032-1052},
      keywords = {CMS, APP},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2011.01.12}
    }
  • H. Anderl, D. Zur Nedden, and others, “CT-guided stereolithography as a new tool in craniofacial surgery,” British journal of plastic surgery, vol. 47, iss. 1, pp. 60-64, 1994.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Anderl1994,
      author = {Anderl, H. and Zur Nedden, D. and others},
      title = {CT-guided stereolithography as a new tool in craniofacial surgery},
      journal = {British journal of plastic surgery},
      year = {1994},
      volume = {47},
      pages = {60 - 64},
      number = {1},
      file = {Anderl1994.pdf:Anderl1994.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0007-1226},
      keywords = {SLR, CMS, RPP, SUR},
      owner = {Thomas},
      publisher = {Elsevier},
      timestamp = {2011.02.09}
    }
  • S. Barre, C. Fernandez-Maloigne, P. Paume, and G. Subrenat, “Simulating facial surgery,” , vol. 3960, p. 334, 2000.
    [Bibtex]
    @CONFERENCE{Barre2000,
      author = {Barre, S. and Fernandez-Maloigne, C. and Paume, P. and Subrenat,
      G.},
      title = {Simulating facial surgery},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of SPIE},
      year = {2000},
      volume = {3960},
      pages = {334},
      file = {Barre2000.pdf:Barre2000.pdf:PDF},
      keywords = {TEC},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2011.01.12}
    }
  • J. S. Bill, J. F. Reuther, W. Dittmann, N. Kübler, J. L. Meier, H. Pistner, and G. Wittenberg, “Stereolithography in oral and maxillofacial operation planning= Einsatz der Stereolithographie in der Planung mund-kiefer-gesichtschirurgischer Engriffe,” International journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery, vol. 24, iss. 1, pp. 95-103, 1995.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Bill1995,
      author = {Bill, J.S. and Reuther, J.F. and Dittmann, W. and K{\\"u}bler, N.
      and Meier, J.L. and Pistner, H. and Wittenberg, G.},
      title = {Stereolithography in oral and maxillofacial operation planning= Einsatz
      der Stereolithographie in der Planung mund-kiefer-gesichtschirurgischer
      Engriffe},
      journal = {International journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery},
      year = {1995},
      volume = {24},
      pages = {95 - 103},
      number = {1},
      issn = {0901-5027},
      keywords = {RPP, CMS, APP},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      publisher = {Elsevier},
      timestamp = {2011.01.12}
    }
  • A. Bottino, P. Torino, A. Laurentini, and L. Rosano, “A New Computer-aided Technique for Planning the Aesthetic Outcome of Plastic Surgery,” , 2008.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Bottino2008,
      author = {Bottino, Andrea and Torino, Politecnico and Laurentini, Aldo and
      Rosano, Luisa},
      title = {A New Computer-aided Technique for Planning the Aesthetic Outcome
      of Plastic Surgery},
      year = {2008},
      abstract = {Plastic surgery plays a major role in today health care. Planning
      plastic face surgery requires dealing with the elusive concept of
      attractiveness for evaluating feasible beautification of a particular
      face. The existing computer tools essentially allow to manually warp
      2D images or 3D face scans, in order to produce images simulating
      possible surgery outcomes. How to manipulate faces, as well as the
      evaluation of the results, are left to the surgeon’s judgement. We
      propose a new quantitative approach able to automatically suggest
      effective patient-specific improvements of facial attractiveness.
      The general idea is to compare the face of the patient with a large
      database of attractive faces, excluding the facial feature to be
      improved. Then, the feature of the faces more similar is applied,
      with a suitable morphing, to the face of the patient. In this paper
      we present a first application of the general idea in the field of
      nose surgery. Aesthetically effective rhinoplasty is suggested on
      the base of the entire face profile, a very important 2D feature
      for rating face attractiveness.},
      file = {Bottino2008.pdf:Bottino2008.pdf:PDF},
      keywords = {automatic beautification,face profile,plastic surgery,rhinoplasty,
      APP, PLA, OCS, CMS},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • L. H. C. Cevidanes, S. Tucker, M. Styner, H. Kim, J. Chapuis, M. Reyes, W. Proffit, T. Turvey, and M. Jaskolka, “Three-dimensional surgical simulation.,” American journal of orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics : official publication of the American Association of Orthodontists, its constituent societies, and the American Board of Orthodontics, vol. 138, iss. 3, pp. 361-71, 2010.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Cevidanes2010,
      author = {Cevidanes, Lucia H C and Tucker, Scott and Styner, Martin and Kim,
      Hyungmin and Chapuis, Jonas and Reyes, Mauricio and Proffit, William
      and Turvey, Timothy and Jaskolka, Michael},
      title = {Three-dimensional surgical simulation.},
      journal = {American journal of orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics : official
      publication of the American Association of Orthodontists, its constituent
      societies, and the American Board of Orthodontics},
      year = {2010},
      volume = {138},
      pages = {361-71},
      number = {3},
      month = {September},
      abstract = {In this article, we discuss the development of methods for computer-aided
      jaw surgery, which allows us to incorporate the high level of precision
      necessary for transferring virtual plans into the operating room.
      We also present a complete computer-aided surgery system developed
      in close collaboration with surgeons. Surgery planning and simulation
      include construction of 3-dimensional surface models from cone-beam
      computed tomography, dynamic cephalometry, semiautomatic mirroring,
      interactive cutting of bone, and bony segment repositioning. A virtual
      setup can be used to manufacture positioning splints for intraoperative
      guidance. The system provides further intraoperative assistance with
      a computer display showing jaw positions and 3-dimensional positioning
      guides updated in real time during the surgical procedure. The computer-aided
      surgery system aids in dealing with complex cases with benefits for
      the patient, with surgical practice, and for orthodontic finishing.
      Advanced software tools for diagnosis and treatment planning allow
      preparation of detailed operative plans, osteotomy repositioning,
      bone reconstructions, surgical resident training, and assessing the
      difficulties of the surgical procedures before the surgery. Computer-aided
      surgery can make the elaboration of the surgical plan a more flexible
      process, increase the level of detail and accuracy of the plan, yield
      higher operative precision and control, and enhance documentation
      of cases.},
      file = {Cevidanes2010.pdf:Cevidanes2010.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {1097-6752},
      keywords = {Cephalometry,Cephalometry: methods,Computer Simulation,Cone-Beam Computed
      Tomography,Data Display,Dental Models,Finite Element Analysis,Humans,Image
      Processing, Computer-Assisted,Image Processing, Computer-Assisted:
      methods,Imaging, Three-Dimensional,Imaging, Three-Dimensional: methods,Information
      Systems,Intraoperative Care,Orthognathic Surgical Procedures,Orthognathic
      Surgical Procedures: methods,Osteotomy,Osteotomy: methods,Patient
      Care Planning,Reconstructive Surgical Procedures,Reconstructive Surgical
      Procedures: methods,Software,Surgery, Computer-Assisted,Surgery,
      Computer-Assisted: methods,User-Computer Interface, APP, CMS, OCS,
      TEC, GUI, PLA, SUR},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      pmid = {20816308},
      publisher = {American Association of Orthodontists},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • M. Chabanas, C. Marecaux, Y. Payan, and F. Boutault, “Computer aided planning for orthognatic surgery,” ArXiv Physics e-prints, 2006.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Chabanas2006,
      author = {Chabanas, M. and Marecaux, C. and Payan, Y. and Boutault, F.},
      title = {Computer aided planning for orthognatic surgery},
      journal = {ArXiv Physics e-prints},
      year = {2006},
      month = {October},
      abstract = {A computer aided maxillofacial sequence is presented, applied to orthognatic
      surgery. It consists of 5 main stages: data acquisition and integration,
      surgical planning, surgical simulation, and per operative assistance.
      The planning and simulation steps are then addressed in a way that
      is clinically relevant. First concepts toward a 3D cephalometry are
      presented for a morphological analysis, surgical planning, and bone
      and soft tissue simulation. The aesthetic surgical outcomes of bone
      repositioning are studied with a biomechanical Finite Element soft
      tissue model.},
      eprint = {arXiv:physics/0610213},
      file = {Chabanas2006.pdf:Chabanas2006.pdf:PDF},
      keywords = {Physics - Medical Physics, APP, CMS, PLA, GUI, OCS, SUR},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.10.26}
    }
  • M. Chabanas and Y. PAVAN, “Finite element model of the face soft tissue for computer assisted maxillofacial surgery,” , 2001.
    [Bibtex]
    @CONFERENCE{Chabanas2001,
      author = {Chabanas, M. and PAVAN, Y.},
      title = {Finite element model of the face soft tissue for computer assisted
      maxillofacial surgery},
      booktitle = {INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON COMPUTER METHODS IN BIOMECHANICS \& BIOMEDICAL
      ENGINEERING (5.: 2001: Rome). Anais. Rome},
      year = {2001},
      file = {Chabanas2001.pdf:Chabanas2001.pdf:PDF},
      keywords = {OCS, TEC, CMS, SUR},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2011.01.10}
    }
  • M. Chabanas and Y. Payan, “A 3D Finite Element model of the face for simulation in plastic and maxillo-facial surgery,” , pp. 411-496, 2000.
    [Bibtex]
    @CONFERENCE{Chabanas2000,
      author = {Chabanas, M. and Payan, Y.},
      title = {A 3D Finite Element model of the face for simulation in plastic and
      maxillo-facial surgery},
      booktitle = {Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention--MICCAI
      2000},
      year = {2000},
      pages = {411 - 496},
      organization = {Springer},
      file = {Chabanas2000.pdf:Chabanas2000.pdf:PDF},
      keywords = {TEC, CMS, SUR},
      owner = {Thomas},
      timestamp = {2011.02.08}
    }
  • J. Chapuis, A. Schramm, I. Pappas, W. Hallermann, K. Schwenzer-Zimmerer, F. Langlotz, and M. Caversaccio, “A new system for computer-aided preoperative planning and intraoperative navigation during corrective jaw surgery.,” IEEE transactions on information technology in biomedicine : a publication of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, vol. 11, iss. 3, pp. 274-87, 2007.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Chapuis2007,
      author = {Chapuis, Jonas and Schramm, Alexander and Pappas, Ion and Hallermann,
      Wock and Schwenzer-Zimmerer, Katja and Langlotz, Frank and Caversaccio,
      Marco},
      title = {A new system for computer-aided preoperative planning and intraoperative
      navigation during corrective jaw surgery.},
      journal = {IEEE transactions on information technology in biomedicine : a publication
      of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society},
      year = {2007},
      volume = {11},
      pages = {274-87},
      number = {3},
      month = {May},
      abstract = {A new system for computer-aided corrective surgery of the jaws has
      been developed and introduced clinically. It combines three-dimensional
      (3-D) surgical planning with conventional dental occlusion planning.
      The developed software allows simulating the surgical correction
      on virtual 3-D models of the facial skeleton generated from computed
      tomography (CT) scans. Surgery planning and simulation include dynamic
      cephalometry, semi-automatic mirroring, interactive cutting of bone
      and segment repositioning. By coupling the software with a tracking
      system and with the help of a special registration procedure, we
      are able to acquire dental occlusion plans from plaster model mounts.
      Upon completion of the surgical plan, the setup is used to manufacture
      positioning splints for intraoperative guidance. The system provides
      further intraoperative assistance with the help of a display showing
      jaw positions and 3-D positioning guides updated in real time during
      the surgical procedure. The proposed approach offers the advantages
      of 3-D visualization and tracking technology without sacrificing
      long-proven cast-based techniques for dental occlusion evaluation.
      The system has been applied on one patient. Throughout this procedure,
      we have experienced improved assessment of pathology, increased precision,
      and augmented control.},
      file = {Chapuis2007.pdf:Chapuis2007.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {1089-7771},
      keywords = {Humans,Imaging, Three-Dimensional,Imaging, Three-Dimensional: methods,Intraoperative
      Care,Intraoperative Care: methods,Jaw Abnormalities,Jaw Abnormalities:
      surgery,Osteotomy,Osteotomy: methods,Preoperative Care,Preoperative
      Care: methods,Reconstructive Surgical Procedures,Reconstructive Surgical
      Procedures: methods,Software,Surgery, Computer-Assisted,Surgery,
      Computer-Assisted: methods,Systems Integration,User-Computer Interface,
      APP, CMS, OCS, PLA, GUI, TRM, SUR, SLR},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      pmid = {17521077},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • C. Cutting, F. Bookstein, B. Grayson, L. Fellingham, and J. McCarthy, “Three-dimensional computer-assisted design of craniofacial surgical procedures: optimization and interaction with cephalometric and CT-based models.,” Plastic and reconstructive surgery, vol. 77, iss. 6, p. 877, 1986.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Cutting1986,
      author = {Cutting, C. and Bookstein, FL and Grayson, B. and Fellingham, L.
      and McCarthy, JG},
      title = {Three-dimensional computer-assisted design of craniofacial surgical
      procedures: optimization and interaction with cephalometric and CT-based
      models.},
      journal = {Plastic and reconstructive surgery},
      year = {1986},
      volume = {77},
      pages = {877},
      number = {6},
      issn = {0032 - 1052},
      owner = {Thomas}
    }
  • P. S. D’Urso, T. M. Barker, J. W. Earwaker, L. Bruce, L. R. Atkinson, M. W. Lanigan, J. F. Arvier, and D. E. J. and, “Stereolithographic biomodelling in cranio-maxillofacial surgery: a prospective trial,” Journal of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery, vol. 27, iss. 1, pp. 30-37, 1999.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Durso1999,
      author = {Paul S. D'Urso and Timothy M. Barker and W. John Earwaker and Lain
      J. Bruce and R. Leigh Atkinson and Michael W. Lanigan and John F.
      Arvier and David J. Effeney and},
      title = {Stereolithographic biomodelling in cranio-maxillofacial surgery:
      a prospective trial},
      journal = {Journal of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery},
      year = {1999},
      volume = {27},
      pages = {30 - 37},
      number = {1},
      abstract = {Summary Stereolithographic (SL) biomodelling is a new technology that
      allows three-dimensional (3-D) computed tomography (CT) data to be
      used to manufacture solid plastic replicas of anatomical structures
      (biomodels). A prospective trial with the objective of assessing
      the utility of biomodelling in complex surgery has been performed.
      Forty-five patients with craniofacial, maxillofacial, skull base
      cervical spinal pathology were selected. 3-D CT or MR scanning was
      performed and the data of interest were edited and converted into
      a form acceptable to the rapid prototyping technology SL. The data
      were used to guide a laser to selectively polymerize photosensitive
      resin to manufacture biomodels. The biomodels were used by surgeons
      for patient education, diagnosis and operative planning. An assessment
      protocol was used to test the hypothesis that [`]biomodels in addition
      to standard imaging had greater utility in the surgery performed
      than the standard imaging alone'. Biomodels significantly improved
      operative planning (images 44.09%, images with biomodel 82.21%, P<.01)
      and diagnosis (images 65.63%, images with biomodel 95.23%, P<.01).
      Biomodels were found to improve measurement accuracy significantly
      (image measurement error 44.14%, biomodel measurement error 7.91%,
      P<.05). Surgeons estimated that the use of biomodels reduced operating
      time by a mean of 17.63% and were cost effective at a mean price
      of $1031 AUS. Patients found the biomodels to be helpful for informed
      consent (images 63.53%, biomodels 88.54%, P<.001). Biomodelling is
      an intuitive, user-friendly technology that facilitated diagnosis
      and operative planning. Biomodels allowed surgeons to rehearse procedures
      readily and improved communication between colleagues and patients.},
      file = {Durso1999.pdf:Durso1999.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {1010-5182},
      keywords = {APP, RPP, PLA, TRM},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2011.01.10}
    }
  • P. S. D’Urso, W. J. Earwaker, T. M. Barker, M. J. Redmond, R. G. Thompson, D. J. Effeney, and F. H. Tomlinson, “Custom cranioplasty using stereolithography and acrylic,” British Journal of Plastic Surgery, vol. 53, iss. 3, pp. 200-204, 2000.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Durso2000,
      author = {P. S. D'Urso and W. J. Earwaker and T. M. Barker and M. J. Redmond
      and R. G. Thompson and D. J. Effeney and F. H. Tomlinson},
      title = {Custom cranioplasty using stereolithography and acrylic},
      journal = {British Journal of Plastic Surgery},
      year = {2000},
      volume = {53},
      pages = {200 - 204},
      number = {3},
      abstract = {Numerous methods of cranioplasty have been described. Customisation
      and prefabrication have been reported to reduce operating time and
      improve cosmesis. An original technique for the manufacture of customised
      cranioplastic implants has been developed and tested in 30 patients.
      Thirty patients requiring cranioplasties were selected. Data acquired
      from computed tomography (CT) were used to manufacture exact plastic
      replicas (biomodels) of craniotomy defects and master cranioplastic
      implants using the rapid prototyping technology of stereolithography
      (SL). The three-dimensional (3D) imaging techniques of mirroring
      and interpolation were used to extrapolate on existing anatomy to
      design the master implants. The master implants were hand finished
      to fit the defect in the corresponding cranial biomodel exactly and
      were then used to create a cavity mould. The mould was used to cast
      thermally polymerised custom acrylic implants. The surgeons reported
      that the customised implants reduced operating time, afforded excellent
      cosmesis and were cost effective. The patients reported that the
      opportunity to see the biomodel and implant preoperatively improved
      their understanding of the procedure. Two complications were noted,
      one infection and one implant required significant trimming. The
      simultaneous manufacture of the master implant (male) and biomodel
      (female) components from SL allowed custom accurate implants to be
      manufactured. Disadvantages identified were the time required for
      computer manipulations of the CT data (up to 2 h), difficulty in
      assessing the accuracy of the computer generated master as a 3D rendering,
      the potential for SL parts to warp, manufacturing time (minimum 2
      days) and the cost of approximately $1300 US per case ($1000 for
      the SL biomodel and $300 for the acrylic casting). },
      file = {Durso2000.pdf:Durso2000.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0007-1226},
      keywords = {cranioplasty, biomodelling, stereolithography, rapid prototyping,
      customised implant., APP, RPP, CMS},
      owner = {Thomas},
      timestamp = {2011.02.15}
    }
  • M. De and others, “Automatic extraction of the mid-facial plane for cranio-maxillofacial surgery planning,” International journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery, vol. 35, iss. 7, pp. 636-642, 2006.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{De2006,
      author = {De, M. and others},
      title = {Automatic extraction of the mid-facial plane for cranio-maxillofacial
      surgery planning},
      journal = {International journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery},
      year = {2006},
      volume = {35},
      pages = {636 - 642},
      number = {7},
      issn = {0901-5027},
      keywords = {TEC, CMS},
      owner = {Thomas},
      publisher = {Elsevier},
      timestamp = {2011.02.03}
    }
  • A. El-Bialy, “Towards a Complete Computer Dental Treatment System,” in Biomedical Engineering Conference, 2008. CIBEC 2008. Cairo International, 2008, pp. 1-8.
    [Bibtex]
    @INPROCEEDINGS{Bialy2008,
      author = {El-Bialy, A.},
      title = {Towards a Complete Computer Dental Treatment System},
      booktitle = {Biomedical Engineering Conference, 2008. CIBEC 2008. Cairo International},
      year = {2008},
      pages = {1 -8},
      month = {December},
      abstract = {This paper introduces the production of 3D virtual clinic to help
      dentists in their treatment. To achieve this goal, different scientific
      areas are integrated such as: computer graphics, pattern recognition,
      computer vision, information technology and finite element machine
      (FEM). The proposed system includes the following tools; patient
      information system, automatic 2-D cephalometrics, 3-D cephalometrics,
      3-D visualization, surgical planning, 3-D registration, soft tissue
      simulation, pre and post treatment analysis, etc. Acquisition of
      the 3D virtual model of the patient is the foundation of this work.
      The CT slides of the patient's head (soft and hard tissues) are collected
      in a DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine) format.
      These slides are then compiled to build up the patient's 3D model.
      Using ray-casting volume rendering technique, a digital computer
      based 3D replica is built. The theme also includes the detection
      of defective skeletal and dental areas by applying the appropriate
      diagnostic procedures. Based upon the diagnostic outcome, the necessary
      changes are executed; manipulation of the virtual 3D image and evaluation
      of the final result after rectification will be possible.},
      file = {:Bialy2008.pdf:PDF},
      keywords = {2D cephalometrics;3D cephalometrics;3D image registration;3D image
      visualization;3D virtual clinic;DICOM format;computer dental treatment
      system;computer graphics;computer vision;dentistry;digital imaging
      and communication in medicine format;finite element machine;information
      technology;patient diagnostics;patient information system;pattern
      recognition;ray casting volume rendering;soft tissue simulation;surgical
      planning;PACS;dentistry;finite element analysis;image registration;medical
      image processing;patient diagnosis;patient treatment;virtual reality;,
      CMS, APP, PLA, VOR, SUR, OCS},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.11.02}
    }
  • C. C. Galanis, M. M. Sfantsikopoulos, P. T. Koidis, N. M. Kafantaris, and P. G. Mpikos, “Computer methods for automating preoperative dental implant planning: implant positioning and size assignment.,” Computer methods and programs in biomedicine, vol. 86, iss. 1, pp. 30-8, 2007.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Galanis2007,
      author = {Galanis, Christos C and Sfantsikopoulos, Michael M and Koidis, Petros
      T and Kafantaris, Nikolaos M and Mpikos, Pavlos G},
      title = {Computer methods for automating preoperative dental implant planning:
      implant positioning and size assignment.},
      journal = {Computer methods and programs in biomedicine},
      year = {2007},
      volume = {86},
      pages = {30-8},
      number = {1},
      month = {April},
      abstract = {The paper presents computer-aided methods that allocate a dental implant
      and suggest its size, during the pre-operative planning stage, in
      conformance with introduced optimization criteria and established
      clinical requirements. Based on computed tomography data of the jaw
      and prosthesis anatomy, single tooth cases are planned for the best-suited
      implant insertion at a user-defined region. An optimum implantation
      axis line is produced and cylindrical implants of various candidate
      sizes are then automatically positioned, while their occlusal end
      is leveled to bone ridge, and evaluated. Radial safety margins are
      used for the assessment of the implant safety distance from neighboring
      anatomical structures and bone quantity and quality are estimated
      and taken into consideration. A case study demonstrates the concept
      and allows for its discussion.},
      file = {Galanis2007.pdf:Galanis2007.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0169-2607},
      keywords = {Decision Making, Computer-Assisted,Dental Implants,Dentistry, Operative,Dentistry,
      Operative: organization \& administratio,Greece,Humans,Preoperative
      Care,Tomography, X-Ray Computed, APP, PLA, CMS},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      pmid = {17267066},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • S. Ghanai, R. Marmulla, J. Wiechnik, J. Mühling, and B. Kotrikova, “Computer-assisted three-dimensional surgical planning: 3D virtual articulator: technical note.,” International journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery, vol. 39, iss. 1, pp. 75-82, 2010.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Ghanai2010,
      author = {Ghanai, S and Marmulla, R and Wiechnik, J and M\"{u}hling, J and
      Kotrikova, B},
      title = {Computer-assisted three-dimensional surgical planning: 3D virtual
      articulator: technical note.},
      journal = {International journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery},
      year = {2010},
      volume = {39},
      pages = {75-82},
      number = {1},
      month = {January},
      abstract = {This study presents a computer-assisted planning system for dysgnathia
      treatment. It describes the process of information gathering using
      a virtual articulator and how the splints are constructed for orthognathic
      surgery. The deviation of the virtually planned splints is shown
      in six cases on the basis of conventionally planned cases. In all
      cases the plaster models were prepared and scanned using a 3D laser
      scanner. Successive lateral and posterior-anterior cephalometric
      images were used for reconstruction before surgery. By identifying
      specific points on the X-rays and marking them on the virtual models,
      it was possible to enhance the 2D images to create a realistic 3D
      environment and to perform virtual repositioning of the jaw. A hexapod
      was used to transfer the virtual planning to the real splints. Preliminary
      results showed that conventional repositioning could be replicated
      using the virtual articulator.},
      file = {Ghanai2010.pdf:Ghanai2010.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {1399-0020},
      keywords = {Cephalometry,Cephalometry: methods,Dental Articulators,Dental Models,Equipment
      Design,Humans,Image Processing, Computer-Assisted,Image Processing,
      Computer-Assisted: methods,Imaging, Three-Dimensional,Imaging, Three-Dimensional:
      methods,Jaw Relation Record,Jaw Relation Record: instrumentation,Jaw
      Relation Record: methods,Lasers,Mandible,Mandible: pathology,Maxilla,Maxilla:
      pathology,Orthognathic Surgical Procedures,Orthognathic Surgical
      Procedures: instrumentation,Orthognathic Surgical Procedures: methods,Patient
      Care Planning,Radiography, Dental, Digital,Radiography, Dental, Digital:
      methods,Software,Splints,Surgery, Computer-Assisted,Surgery, Computer-Assisted:
      methods,User-Computer Interface, APP, CMS, RPP, SLR, TRM},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      pmid = {20005674},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • S. Girod, E. Keeve, and B. Girod, “Advances in interactive craniofacial surgery planning by 3D simulation and visualization,” International journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery, vol. 24, iss. 1, pp. 120-125, 1995.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Girod1995,
      author = {Girod, S. and Keeve, E. and Girod, B.},
      title = {Advances in interactive craniofacial surgery planning by 3D simulation
      and visualization},
      journal = {International journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery},
      year = {1995},
      volume = {24},
      pages = {120 - 125},
      number = {1},
      file = {Girod1995.pdf:Girod1995.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0901-5027},
      keywords = {APP, PLA, CMS, OCS},
      owner = {Thomas},
      publisher = {Elsevier},
      timestamp = {2011.02.03}
    }
  • S. Girod, M. Teschner, U. Schrell, B. Kevekordes, and B. Girod, “Computer-aided 3-D simulation and prediction of craniofacial surgery: a new approach,” Journal of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery, vol. 29, iss. 3, pp. 156-158, 2001.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Girod2001,
      author = {Girod, S. and Teschner, M. and Schrell, U. and Kevekordes, B. and
      Girod, B.},
      title = {Computer-aided 3-D simulation and prediction of craniofacial surgery:
      a new approach},
      journal = {Journal of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery},
      year = {2001},
      volume = {29},
      pages = {156 - 158},
      number = {3},
      file = {Girod2001.pdf:Girod2001.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {1010-5182},
      keywords = {APP, CMS, PLA, OCS},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      publisher = {Elsevier},
      timestamp = {2011.01.10}
    }
  • S. Hassfeld and J. Mühling, “Navigation in maxillofacial and craniofacial surgery,” Computer Aided Surgery, vol. 3, iss. 4, pp. 183-187, 1998.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Hassfeld1998b,
      author = {Hassfeld, S. and Mühling, J.},
      title = {Navigation in maxillofacial and craniofacial surgery},
      journal = {Computer Aided Surgery},
      year = {1998},
      volume = {3},
      pages = {183--187},
      number = {4},
      file = {Hassfeld1998b.pdf:Hassfeld1998b.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {1097-0150},
      keywords = {APP, CMS, SLR, PLA},
      owner = {Thomas},
      publisher = {John Wiley \& Sons},
      timestamp = {2011.02.03}
    }
  • S. Hassfeld, J. Mühling, C. Wirtz, M. Knauth, T. Lutze, and H. Schulz, “Intraoperative guidance in maxillofacial and craniofacial surgery,” Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part H: Journal of Engineering in Medicine, vol. 211, iss. 4, pp. 277-283, 1997.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Hassfeld1997,
      author = {Hassfeld, S. and Mühling, J. and Wirtz, CR and Knauth, M. and Lutze,
      T. and Schulz, HJ},
      title = {Intraoperative guidance in maxillofacial and craniofacial surgery},
      journal = {Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part H: Journal
      of Engineering in Medicine},
      year = {1997},
      volume = {211},
      pages = {277 - 283},
      number = {4},
      file = {Hassfeld1997.pdf:Hassfeld1997.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0954-4119},
      keywords = {APP, CMS, GUI, SLR},
      owner = {Thomas},
      publisher = {Prof Eng Publishing},
      timestamp = {2011.02.03}
    }
  • S. Hassfeld, J. Mühling, and J. Zöller, “Intraoperative navigation in oral and maxillofacial surgery,” International journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery, vol. 24, iss. 1, pp. 111-119, 1995.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Hassfeld1995,
      author = {Hassfeld, S. and Mühling, J. and Zöller, J.},
      title = {Intraoperative navigation in oral and maxillofacial surgery},
      journal = {International journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery},
      year = {1995},
      volume = {24},
      pages = {111 - 119},
      number = {1},
      file = {Hassfeld1995.pdf:Hassfeld1995.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0901-5027},
      owner = {Thomas},
      publisher = {Elsevier},
      timestamp = {2011.02.03}
    }
  • S. Hassfeld, J. Zöller, F. K. Albert, C. R. Wirtz, M. Knauth, and J. Muhling, “Preoperative planning and intraoperative navigation in skull base surgery.,” Journal of cranio-maxillo-facial surgery : official publication of the European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery, vol. 26, iss. 4, pp. 220-5, 1998.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Hassfeld1998a,
      author = {Hassfeld, S and Zöller, J and Albert, F K and Wirtz, C R and Knauth,
      M and Muhling, J},
      title = {Preoperative planning and intraoperative navigation in skull base
      surgery.},
      journal = {Journal of cranio-maxillo-facial surgery : official publication of
      the European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery},
      year = {1998},
      volume = {26},
      pages = {220 - 5},
      number = {4},
      month = {August},
      abstract = {Experience with the commercially available, 3-D navigation systems
      Viewing Wand (ISG, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada) and SPOCS (Aesculap,
      Germany) in skull base surgery is presented. Having meanwhile been
      tested in over 60 clinical trials, the systems achieved an accuracy
      of < or = 2.7 mm which, at the moment, we deem sufficiently acceptable
      to proceed with their clinical evaluation. There was no difference
      in intraoperative accuracy between the mechanical and the optical
      navigation systems. The systems proved to be very helpful in identifying
      the extent of the tumours and in visualizing the proximity of vital
      structures. 3-D-planning, simulation and intraoperative navigation
      especially facilitates surgery in anatomically complicated situations,
      without risk of damaging neighbouring structures. The SPOCS (Surgical
      Planning and Orientation Computer System) revealed a considerably
      improved flexibility in handling and a better integration into the
      surgical procedure in comparison with the relatively inflexible and
      space-demanding Viewing Wand arm. Especially, the 'offset' function
      of the SPOCS offers the possibility of a virtual elongation of the
      instrument and thus, in combination with the on-line visualization
      of the corresponding images, of a 'look ahead' operation. By using
      computer-assisted simulation and navigation systems, we can expect
      quality improvement and risk reduction. More extensive and radical
      interventions seem possible.},
      file = {Hassfeld1998a.pdf:Hassfeld1998a.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {1010-5182},
      keywords = {Computer Simulation,Computer Systems,Electronics, Medical,Electronics,
      Medical: instrumentation,Equipment Design,Humans,Image Processing,
      Computer-Assisted,Infrared Rays,Intraoperative Care,Magnetic Resonance
      Imaging,Meningioma,Meningioma: surgery,Middle Aged,Nasal Bone,Nasal
      Bone: surgery,Neoplasm Invasiveness,Nose Neoplasms,Nose Neoplasms:
      surgery,Online Systems,Orbital Neoplasms,Orbital Neoplasms: surgery,Patient
      Care Planning,Photography,Photography: instrumentation,Skull Base,Skull
      Base Neoplasms,Skull Base Neoplasms: surgery,Skull Base: surgery,Therapy,
      Computer-Assisted,Therapy, Computer-Assisted: instrumentation,Tomography,
      X-Ray Computed,User-Computer Interface},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      pmid = {9777500},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • M. Heiland, C. R. Habermann, and R. Schmelzle, “Indications and limitations of intraoperative navigation in maxillofacial surgery,” Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, vol. 62, iss. 9, pp. 1059-1063, 2004.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Heiland2004,
      author = {Heiland, M. and Habermann, C.R. and Schmelzle, R.},
      title = {Indications and limitations of intraoperative navigation in maxillofacial
      surgery},
      journal = {Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery},
      year = {2004},
      volume = {62},
      pages = {1059 - 1063},
      number = {9},
      file = {Heiland2004.pdf:Heiland2004.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0278-2391},
      owner = {Thomas},
      publisher = {Elsevier},
      timestamp = {2011.02.04}
    }
  • H. Kawachi, Y. Kawachi, C. Ikeda, R. Takagi, A. Katakura, and T. Shibahara, “Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery with Computer-assisted Navigation System,” The Bulletin of Tokyo Dental College, vol. 51, iss. 1, pp. 35-39, 2010.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Kawachi2010,
      author = {Kawachi, H. and Kawachi, Y. and Ikeda, C. and Takagi, R. and Katakura,
      A. and Shibahara, T.},
      title = {Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery with Computer-assisted Navigation
      System},
      journal = {The Bulletin of Tokyo Dental College},
      year = {2010},
      volume = {51},
      pages = {35 - 39},
      number = {1},
      abstract = {Intraoperative computer-assisted navigation has gained acceptance
      in maxillofacial surgery with applications in an increasing number
      of indications. We adapted a commercially available wireless passive
      marker system which allows calibration and tracking of virtually
      every instrument in maxillofacial surgery. Virtual computer-generated
      anatomical structures are displayed intraoperatively in a semi-immersive
      head-up display. Continuous observation of the operating field facilitated
      by computer assistance enables surgical navigation in accordance
      with the physician's preoperative plans. This case report documents
      the potential for augmented visualization concepts in surgical resection
      of tumors in the oral and maxillofacial region. We report a case
      of T3N2bM0 carcinoma of the maxillary gingival which was surgically
      resected with the assistance of the Stryker Navigation Cart System.
      This system was found to be useful in assisting preoperative planning
      and intraoperative monitoring.},
      file = {Kawachi2010.pdf:Kawachi2010.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0040-8891},
      keywords = {APP, CMS, GUI, PLA, SUR},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      publisher = {J-STAGE},
      timestamp = {2010.11.08}
    }
  • E. Keeve, S. Girod, P. Pfeifle, and B. Girod, “Anatomy-Based Facial Tissue Modeling Using the Finite Element Method,” , 1996.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Keeve1996b,
      author = {Keeve, Erwin and Girod, Sabine and Pfeifle, Paula and Girod, Bernd},
      title = {Anatomy-Based Facial Tissue Modeling Using the Finite Element Method},
      year = {1996},
      abstract = {Anatomy-based facial tissue modeling for surgical simulation is a
      field whose time has come. Real-time facial animation has been created
      in the last few years using models based on the anatomical structure
      of the human skin. Anatomy-based models are also under development
      in the field of medical visualization, with which facial surgery
      can be realistically simulated. In this article we present an anatomy-based
      3D finite element tissue model. Integrated into a computer-aided
      surgical planning system this model allows the precise prediction
      of soft tissue changes resulting from the realignment of the underlying
      bone structure. The model has already been used in our Department
      of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and has improved craniofacial surgical
      planning procedures. The model is described in detail and surgical
      simulation results are shown and discussed.},
      file = {Keeve1996b.pdf:Keeve1996b.pdf:PDF},
      keywords = {computer-aided surgery,finite element method,human facial modeling,surgery
      planning and simulation, TEC},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • C. Kermer, A. Lindner, I. Friede, A. Wagner, and W. Millesi, “Preoperative stereolithographic model planning for primary reconstruction in craniomaxillofacial trauma surgery,” Journal of Cranio-maxillofacial Surgery, vol. 26, iss. 3, pp. 136-139, 1998.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Kermer1998a,
      author = {Kermer, C. and Lindner, A. and Friede, I. and Wagner, A. and Millesi,
      W.},
      title = {Preoperative stereolithographic model planning for primary reconstruction
      in craniomaxillofacial trauma surgery},
      journal = {Journal of Cranio-maxillofacial Surgery},
      year = {1998},
      volume = {26},
      pages = {136 - 139},
      number = {3},
      file = {Kermer1998a.pdf:Kermer1998a.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {1010-5182},
      keywords = {APP, RPP, CMS, PLA},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      publisher = {Elsevier},
      timestamp = {2011.01.10}
    }
  • C. Kermer, M. Rasse, G. Lagogiannis, G. Undt, A. Wagner, and W. Millesi, “Colour stereolithography for planning complex maxillofacial tumour surgery,” Journal of Cranio-maxillofacial Surgery, vol. 26, iss. 6, pp. 360-362, 1998.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Kermer1998b,
      author = {Kermer, C. and Rasse, M. and Lagogiannis, G. and Undt, G. and Wagner,
      A. and Millesi, W.},
      title = {Colour stereolithography for planning complex maxillofacial tumour
      surgery},
      journal = {Journal of Cranio-maxillofacial Surgery},
      year = {1998},
      volume = {26},
      pages = {360 - 362},
      number = {6},
      file = {Kermer1998b.pdf:Kermer1998b.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {1010-5182},
      keywords = {APP, CMS, PLA, CMS},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      publisher = {Elsevier},
      timestamp = {2011.01.10}
    }
  • R. M. Koch, Methods for physics based facial surgery prediction, Hartung-Gorre, 2001.
    [Bibtex]
    @BOOK{Koch2001,
      title = {Methods for physics based facial surgery prediction},
      publisher = {Hartung-Gorre},
      year = {2001},
      author = {Koch, R.M.},
      file = {Koch2001.pdf:Koch2001.pdf:PDF},
      isbn = {389649712X},
      keywords = {APP, CMS, OCS, PLA},
      owner = {Thomas},
      timestamp = {2011.02.08}
    }
  • R. M. Koch, M. H. Gross, F. R. Carls, D. F. von Büren, G. Fankhauser, and Y. I. H. Parish, “Simulating facial surgery using finite element models,” , pp. 421-428, 1996.
    [Bibtex]
    @CONFERENCE{Koch1996,
      author = {Koch, R.M. and Gross, M.H. and Carls, F.R. and von B{\\"u}ren, D.F.
      and Fankhauser, G. and Parish, Y.I.H.},
      title = {Simulating facial surgery using finite element models},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of the 23rd annual conference on Computer graphics and
      interactive techniques},
      year = {1996},
      pages = {421 - 428},
      organization = {ACM},
      file = {Koch1996.pdf:Koch1996.pdf:PDF},
      isbn = {0897917464},
      keywords = {APP, PLA, OCS, PRS, SLR, SUR, VOR},
      owner = {Thomas},
      timestamp = {2011.02.08}
    }
  • R. Koch, S. Roth, M. Gross, A. Zimmermann, and H. Sailer, “A framework for facial surgery simulation,” , pp. 33-42, 2002.
    [Bibtex]
    @CONFERENCE{Koch2002,
      author = {Koch, RM and Roth, SHM and Gross, MH and Zimmermann, AP and Sailer,
      HF},
      title = {A framework for facial surgery simulation},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of the 18th spring conference on Computer graphics},
      year = {2002},
      pages = {33 - 42},
      organization = {ACM},
      file = {Koch2002.pdf:Koch2002.pdf:PDF},
      isbn = {1581136080},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2011.01.10}
    }
  • R. Leonardi, D. Giordano, F. Maiorana, and C. Spampinato, “Automatic cephalometric analysis,” Journal Information, vol. 78, iss. 1, 2008.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Leonardi2008,
      author = {Leonardi, R. and Giordano, D. and Maiorana, F. and Spampinato, C.},
      title = {Automatic cephalometric analysis},
      journal = {Journal Information},
      year = {2008},
      volume = {78},
      number = {1},
      file = {Leonardi2008.pdf:Leonardi2008.pdf:PDF},
      keywords = {TEC, CMS},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2011.01.10}
    }
  • L. J. Lo, J. L. Marsh, M. W. Vannier, and V. V. Patel, “Craniofacial computer-assisted surgical planning and simulation.,” Clinics in plastic surgery, vol. 21, iss. 4, p. 501, 1994.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Lo1994,
      author = {Lo, L.J. and Marsh, J.L. and Vannier, M.W. and Patel, V.V.},
      title = {Craniofacial computer-assisted surgical planning and simulation.},
      journal = {Clinics in plastic surgery},
      year = {1994},
      volume = {21},
      pages = {501},
      number = {4},
      issn = {0094-1298},
      keywords = {CMS, APP, PLA, OCS},
      owner = {Thomas},
      timestamp = {2011.02.03}
    }
  • C. Marchetti, A. Bianchi, L. Muyldermans, D. M. Martino, L. Lancellotti, and A. Sarti, “Validation of new soft tissue software in orthognathic surgery planning,” International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, vol. 40, iss. 1, pp. 26-32, 2011.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Marchetti2011,
      author = {C. Marchetti and A. Bianchi and L. Muyldermans and M. Di Martino
      and L. Lancellotti and A. Sarti},
      title = {Validation of new soft tissue software in orthognathic surgery planning},
      journal = {International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery},
      year = {2011},
      volume = {40},
      pages = {26 - 32},
      number = {1},
      abstract = {This study tests computer imaging software (SurgiCase-CMF®, Materialise)
      that enables surgeons to perform virtual orthognathic surgical planning
      using a three dimensional (3D) utility that previews the final shape
      of hard and soft tissues. It includes a soft tissue simulation module
      that has created images of soft tissues altered through bimaxillary
      orthognathic surgery to correct facial deformities. Cephalometric
      radiographs and CT scans were taken of each patient before and after
      surgery. The surgical planning system consists of four stages: CT
      data reconstruction; 3D model generation of facial hard and soft
      tissue; different virtual surgical planning and simulation modes;
      and various preoperative previews of the soft tissues. Surgical planning
      and simulation is based on a 3D CT reconstructed bone model and soft
      tissue image generation is based on physical algorithms. The software
      rapidly follows clinical options to generate a series of simulations
      and soft tissue models; to avoid TMJ functional problems, pre-surgical
      plans were evaluated by an orthodontist. Comparing simulation results
      with postoperative CT data, the reliability of the soft tissues preview
      was >91%. SurgiCase® software can provide a realistic, accurate forecast
      of the patient's facial appearance after surgery.},
      file = {Marchetti2011.pdf:Marchetti2011.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0901-5027},
      keywords = {computer imaging software, OCS, CMS, APP, PLA},
      owner = {Thomas},
      timestamp = {2011.02.15}
    }
  • R. Marmulla, M. Hilbert, and H. Niederdellmann, “Inherent precision of mechanical, infrared and laser-guided navigation systems for computer-assisted surgery,” Journal of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery, vol. 25, iss. 4, pp. 192-197, 1997.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Marmulla1997,
      author = {Marmulla, R. and Hilbert, M. and Niederdellmann, H.},
      title = {Inherent precision of mechanical, infrared and laser-guided navigation
      systems for computer-assisted surgery},
      journal = {Journal of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery},
      year = {1997},
      volume = {25},
      pages = {192 - 197},
      number = {4},
      file = {Marmulla1997.pdf:Marmulla1997.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {1010-5182},
      owner = {Thomas},
      publisher = {Elsevier},
      timestamp = {2011.02.04}
    }
  • R. Marmulla and H. Niederdellmann, “Surgical planning of computer-assisted repositioning osteotomies,” Plastic and reconstructive surgery, vol. 104, iss. 4, p. 938, 1999.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Marmulla1999,
      author = {Marmulla, R. and Niederdellmann, H.},
      title = {Surgical planning of computer-assisted repositioning osteotomies},
      journal = {Plastic and reconstructive surgery},
      year = {1999},
      volume = {104},
      pages = {938},
      number = {4},
      issn = {0032-1052},
      keywords = {APP, PLA, OTS},
      owner = {Thomas},
      timestamp = {2011.02.04}
    }
  • M. Meehan, M. Teschner, and S. Girod, “Three-dimensional simulation and prediction of craniofacial surgery,” Orthodontics & Craniofacial Research, vol. 6, iss. s1, pp. 102-107, 2003.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Meehan2003,
      author = {Meehan, M. and Teschner, M. and Girod, S.},
      title = {Three-dimensional simulation and prediction of craniofacial surgery},
      journal = {Orthodontics \& Craniofacial Research},
      year = {2003},
      volume = {6},
      pages = {102 - 107},
      number = {s1},
      file = {Meehan2003.pdf:Meehan2003.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {1601-6343},
      keywords = {OCS, PLA, CMS, APP},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      publisher = {John Wiley \& Sons},
      timestamp = {2011.01.25}
    }
  • R. A. Mischkowski, M. Zinser, A. Kübler, U. Seifert, and J. E. Zöller, “The Hollowman – a virtual reality tool in cranio-maxillofacial surgery,” International Congress Series, vol. 1268, pp. 658-661, 2004.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Mischkowski2004,
      author = {R. A. Mischkowski and M. Zinser and A. Kübler and U. Seifert and
      J. E. Zöller},
      title = {The Hollowman - a virtual reality tool in cranio-maxillofacial surgery},
      journal = {International Congress Series},
      year = {2004},
      volume = {1268},
      pages = {658 - 661},
      abstract = {A virtual reality tool for computer-assisted surgery named #The##Hollowman#
      is presented. This allows for a visual tracking of real anatomical
      structures in superposition with volume rendered CT or MRI scans
      and thus can be used for navigated translocation of bony segments.
      For an evaluation study #The##Hollowman# was used in orthognatic
      surgery to control the translocation of the maxilla after Le Fort
      I osteotomy within a bimaxillary procedure. Up to now, four patients
      have been included. The tool has proven very valuable especially
      in complex nonlinear translocations of the maxilla as the surgeon
      could directly visualise the position of the mobilised bone in relation
      to the preoperatively planned situation. The application to other
      types of interventions in cranio-maxillofacial surgery associated
      with movement of bony segments as Le Fort III osteotomy, fronto-orbital
      advancement and cranial vault reshaping or reconstruction seems to
      be considerable as well.},
      file = {Mischkowski2004.pdf:Mischkowski2004.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0531-5131},
      keywords = {The Hollowman, VOR, APP, PLA, VOR, CMS},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.11.02}
    }
  • R. A. Mischkowski, M. Zinser, A. Kübler, U. Seifert, and J.E. Zöller, “Clinical and experimental evaluation of an augmented reality system in cranio-maxillofacial surgery,” International Congress Series, vol. 1281, pp. 565-570, 2005.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Mischkowski2005,
      author = {R.A. Mischkowski and M. Zinser and A. Kübler and U. Seifert and J.E.
      Zöller},
      title = {Clinical and experimental evaluation of an augmented reality system
      in cranio-maxillofacial surgery},
      journal = {International Congress Series},
      year = {2005},
      volume = {1281},
      pages = {565 - 570},
      abstract = {An augmented reality tool for computer-assisted surgery named X-Scope
      allows for visual tracking of real anatomical structures in superposition
      with volume rendered CT or MRI scans and thus can be used for navigated
      translocation of bony segments. In a feasibility study X-Scope was
      used in orthognatic surgery to control the translocation of the maxilla
      after Le Fort I osteotomy within a bimaxillary procedure. The achieved
      situation was compared with the computer-based preoperative planning
      by means of cephalometric analysis on lateral and frontal cephalograms.
      In addition to the clinical feasibility study, an experimental evaluation
      of system accuracy was performed. The technique could be successfully
      applied in 5 patients. The maxillary positioning using X-Scope was
      accomplished with accuracy within a range of 1 mm. The tool was used
      in all cases in addition to the usual intra-operative splints. A
      stand-alone application without conventional control mechanism seems
      to be not reasonable yet. The final analysis of data obtained from
      the accuracy study is not completed yet. The preliminary results
      indicate a deviation of the X-Scope system not significantly greater
      then the deviation of the navigation system itself with a given registration
      method. Augmented reality tools like X-Scope may be helpful for control
      of maxillary translocation in orthognathic surgery. The application
      to other types of interventions in cranio-maxillofacial surgery associated
      with movement of bony segments as Le Fort III osteotomy, fronto-orbital
      advancement, and cranial vault reshaping or reconstruction may be
      considered as well.},
      file = {Mischkowski2005.pdf:Mischkowski2005.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0531-5131},
      keywords = {X-Scope, APP, CMS, AUR},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.11.02}
    }
  • R. Mischkowski, M. Zinser, L. Ritter, J. Neugebauer, E. Keeve, and J. Zöller, “Intraoperative navigation in the maxillofacial area based on 3D imaging obtained by a cone-beam device,” International journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery, vol. 36, iss. 8, pp. 687-694, 2007.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Mischkowski2007,
      author = {Mischkowski, RA and Zinser, MJ and Ritter, L. and Neugebauer, J.
      and Keeve, E. and Z{\\"o}ller, JE},
      title = {Intraoperative navigation in the maxillofacial area based on 3D imaging
      obtained by a cone-beam device},
      journal = {International journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery},
      year = {2007},
      volume = {36},
      pages = {687 - 694},
      number = {8},
      abstract = {The aim of this study was to evaluate intraoperative navigation in
      the maxillofacial area based on three-dimensional imaging obtained
      by a cone-beam device. Digital volume tomograms (DVT) were obtained
      by the prototype of GALILEOS (Sirona Dental Systems Inc., Bensheim,
      Germany), a newly developed, compact size, cone-beam machine with
      a scan volume of 15 cm × 15 cm × 15 cm. Intraoperative navigation
      was performed in 12 patients in three selected indications. Target
      detection error expressing the accuracy of DVT navigation and registration
      performance of specially developed methods for image-to-patient registration
      was estimated. Target detection error was maximally 2 mm and depended
      on the registration method chosen. The automatic detection rate of
      the fiducial markers ranged between 0.64 and 0.32. The preoperatively
      defined treatment plan was fully accomplished in 11 out of 12 cases.
      A favourable surgical outcome was achievable in all cases. Intraoperative
      complications were not observed. Intraoperative navigation based
      on DVT imaging can be considered as a valuable alternative to CT-based
      procedures. Special characteristics of the cone-beam technique, in
      terms of contrast resolution and the limited field-of-view size of
      the devices, restrict the indication spectrum and create a demand
      for modifications of the usual registration methods.},
      file = {Mischkowski2007.pdf:Mischkowski2007.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0901-5027},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      publisher = {Elsevier},
      timestamp = {2010.11.09}
    }
  • B. Mollard, S. Lavallée, and G. Bettega, “Computer assisted orthognathic surgery,” Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Interventation—MICCAI’98, p. 21, 1998.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Mollard1998,
      author = {Mollard, B. and Lavall{\'e}e, S. and Bettega, G.},
      title = {Computer assisted orthognathic surgery},
      journal = {Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Interventation—MICCAI’98},
      year = {1998},
      pages = {21},
      file = {Mollard1998.pdf:Mollard1998.pdf:PDF},
      keywords = {APP, RPP, CMS, PLA, GUI, SUR},
      owner = {Thomas},
      publisher = {Springer},
      timestamp = {2011.02.08}
    }
  • A. D. Nijmeh, N. M. Goodger, D. Hawkes, P. J. Edwards, and M. McGurk, “Image-guided navigation in oral and maxillofacial surgery,” British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, vol. 43, iss. 4, pp. 294-302, 2005.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Nijmeh2005,
      author = {A.D. Nijmeh and N.M. Goodger and D. Hawkes and P.J. Edwards and M.
      McGurk},
      title = {Image-guided navigation in oral and maxillofacial surgery},
      journal = {British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery},
      year = {2005},
      volume = {43},
      pages = {294 - 302},
      number = {4},
      abstract = {Summary Image-guided surgery is the logical extension of imaging as
      it integrates previously acquired radiological or nuclear medicine
      images with the operative field. In conventional image-guided surgery,
      a surgeon uses a surgical instrument or a pointer to establish correspondence
      between features in the preoperative images and the surgical scene.
      This is not ideal because the surgeon has to look away from the operative
      field to view the data. Augmented reality guidance systems offer
      a solution to this problem but are limited by deformation of soft
      tissues. Real-time intraoperative imaging offers a potential solution
      but is currently only experimental. The additional precision and
      confidence that this technology provides make it a useful tool, and
      recent advances in image-guided surgery offer new opportunities in
      the field of oral and maxillofacial surgery. Here, we review the
      development, current technologies, and applications of image-guided
      surgery and illustrate them with two case reports.},
      file = {Nijmeh2005.pdf:Nijmeh2005.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0266-4356},
      keywords = {Image-guided surgery, REV, CMS},
      owner = {Thomas},
      timestamp = {2011.02.09}
    }
  • S. Olsen, “Real-time structural analysis for preoperative surgical planning,” International Congress Series, vol. 1256, pp. 370-375, 2003.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Olsen2003,
      author = {Olsen, S},
      title = {Real-time structural analysis for preoperative surgical planning},
      journal = {International Congress Series},
      year = {2003},
      volume = {1256},
      pages = {370-375},
      month = {June},
      abstract = {In this paper, a novel method for incorporating automatic, patient-specific,
      structural analysis in computer-aided preoperative planning is described.
      Special emphasis has been placed on accurately capturing the mechanical
      behavior of the implant-to-bone interface where failure may occur.
      A finite element solver was developed and integrated into our computer-aided
      planning system for implant dentistry. This paper describes how 3D
      mechanical analysis of bridges, implants and bone can be performed
      in a fully automatic manner providing clinically relevant feedback
      to the surgeon in real time during preoperative planning.},
      file = {Olsen2003.pdf:Olsen2003.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {05315131},
      keywords = {finite element modeling,implant dentistry,structural analysis,surgical
      planning},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • R. Olszewski, G. Cosnard, B. Macq, P. Mahy, and H. Reychler, “3D CT-based cephalometric analysis: 3D cephalometric theoretical concept and software,” Neuroradiology, vol. 48, iss. 11, pp. 853-862, 2006.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Olszewski2006,
      author = {Olszewski, R. and Cosnard, G. and Macq, B. and Mahy, P. and Reychler,
      H.},
      title = {3D CT-based cephalometric analysis: 3D cephalometric theoretical
      concept and software},
      journal = {Neuroradiology},
      year = {2006},
      volume = {48},
      pages = {853 - 862},
      number = {11},
      issn = {0028-3940},
      owner = {Thomas},
      publisher = {Springer},
      timestamp = {2011.02.04}
    }
  • R. Olszewski, M. B. Villamil, D. G. Trevisan, L. P. Nedel, C. M. D. S. Freitas, H. Reychler, and B. Macq, “Towards an integrated system for planning and assisting maxillofacial orthognathic surgery.,” Computer methods and programs in biomedicine, vol. 91, iss. 1, pp. 13-21, 2008.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Olszewski2008,
      author = {Olszewski, Raphael and Villamil, Marta B and Trevisan, Daniela G
      and Nedel, Luciana P and Freitas, Carla M D S and Reychler, Herv\'{e}
      and Macq, Benoit},
      title = {Towards an integrated system for planning and assisting maxillofacial
      orthognathic surgery.},
      journal = {Computer methods and programs in biomedicine},
      year = {2008},
      volume = {91},
      pages = {13-21},
      number = {1},
      month = {July},
      abstract = {Computer-assisted maxillofacial orthognathic surgery is an emerging
      and interdisciplinary field linking orthognathic surgery, remote
      signal engineering and three-dimensional (3D) medical imaging. Most
      of the computational solutions already developed make use of different
      specialized systems which introduce difficulties both in the information
      transfer from one stage to the others and in the use of such systems
      by surgeons. Trying to address such issue, in this work we present
      a common computer-based system that integrates proposed modules for
      planning and assisting the maxillofacial surgery. With that we propose
      to replace the current standard orthognathic preoperative planning,
      and to bring information from a virtual planning to the real operative
      field. The system prototype, including three-dimensional cephalometric
      analysis, static and dynamic virtual orthognathic planning, and mixed
      reality transfer of information to the operation room, is described
      and the first results obtained are presented.},
      file = {Olszewski2008.pdf:Olszewski2008.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0169-2607},
      keywords = {Computer Simulation,Imaging, Three-Dimensional,Imaging, Three-Dimensional:
      methods,Jaw Abnormalities,Jaw Abnormalities: surgery,Maxillofacial
      Abnormalities,Maxillofacial Abnormalities: surgery,Models, Biological,Surgery,
      Computer-Assisted,Surgery, Computer-Assisted: methods,Surgery, Oral,Surgery,
      Oral: methods,Systems Integration,Tomography, X-Ray Computed,Tomography,
      X-Ray Computed: methods,Tooth Abnormalities,Tooth Abnormalities:
      surgery, APP, CMS, GUI, PLA, SUR, RPP},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      pmid = {18417245},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • R. Olszewski, F. Zech, G. Cosnard, V. Nicolas, B. Macq, and H. Reychler, “Three-dimensional computed tomography cephalometric craniofacial analysis: experimental validation in vitro,” International journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery, vol. 36, iss. 9, pp. 828-833, 2007.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Olszewski2007,
      author = {Olszewski, R. and Zech, F. and Cosnard, G. and Nicolas, V. and Macq,
      B. and Reychler, H.},
      title = {Three-dimensional computed tomography cephalometric craniofacial
      analysis: experimental validation in vitro},
      journal = {International journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery},
      year = {2007},
      volume = {36},
      pages = {828 - 833},
      number = {9},
      issn = {0901-5027},
      owner = {Thomas},
      publisher = {Elsevier},
      timestamp = {2011.02.04}
    }
  • I. Porro, A. Schenone, M. Fato, E. Raposio, E. Molinari, and F. Beltrame, “An integrated environment for plastic surgery support: building virtual patients, simulating interventions, and supporting intraoperative decisions.,” Computerized medical imaging and graphics : the official journal of the Computerized Medical Imaging Society, vol. 29, iss. 5, pp. 385-94, 2005.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Porro2005,
      author = {Porro, Ivan and Schenone, Andrea and Fato, Marco and Raposio, Edoardo
      and Molinari, Elisa and Beltrame, Francesco},
      title = {An integrated environment for plastic surgery support: building virtual
      patients, simulating interventions, and supporting intraoperative
      decisions.},
      journal = {Computerized medical imaging and graphics : the official journal
      of the Computerized Medical Imaging Society},
      year = {2005},
      volume = {29},
      pages = {385-94},
      number = {5},
      month = {July},
      abstract = {In the last decade a number of environments for Computer Supported
      Plastic Surgery have been presented. Nevertheless, an overall approach
      for training and intraoperative support is still missing or has not
      been widely exploited yet. We developed a fully integrated system
      which allows surgical simulation, planning, and support for computer-guided
      plastic surgery procedures starting from image acquisition to final
      intraoperative assistance. The system also provides the user with
      a radiological workstation able to analyse patient medical images
      and case studies, with advanced bidimensional and three dimensional
      image processing functionalities. We intend to demonstrate that such
      a platform can be built at an affordable cost. The radiological workstation
      is capable of supporting radiologists and surgeons in real patient
      case studies and the simulation workstation may be adopted by plastic
      surgeons in teaching and training of complex surgical planning. Moreover,
      results of simulation can be used in the operating room with a relatively
      high benefit in terms of improved accuracy, reduction of surgical
      risks, and decrease in training costs.},
      file = {Porro2005.pdf:Porro2005.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0895-6111},
      keywords = {Decision Support Techniques,Humans,Patient Simulation,Radiology Information
      Systems,Radiology Information Systems: organization \& admi,Surgery,
      Computer-Assisted,Surgery, Computer-Assisted: organization \& adminis,Surgery,
      Plastic,Surgery, Plastic: education,User-Computer Interface, APP,
      CMS, GUI, PLA},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      pmid = {15893913},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • M. Robiony, I. Salvo, F. Costa, N. Zerman, C. Bandera, S. Filippi, M. Felice, and M. Politi, “Accuracy of virtual reality and stereolithographic models in maxillo-facial surgical planning,” Journal of Craniofacial Surgery, vol. 19, iss. 2, p. 482, 2008.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Robiony2008,
      author = {Robiony, M. and Salvo, I. and Costa, F. and Zerman, N. and Bandera,
      C. and Filippi, S. and Felice, M. and Politi, M.},
      title = {Accuracy of virtual reality and stereolithographic models in maxillo-facial
      surgical planning},
      journal = {Journal of Craniofacial Surgery},
      year = {2008},
      volume = {19},
      pages = {482},
      number = {2},
      issn = {1049-2275},
      keywords = {REV, RPP, CMS},
      owner = {Thomas},
      timestamp = {2011.02.09}
    }
  • M. Robiony, I. Salvo, F. Costa, N. Zerman, M. Bazzocchi, F. Toso, C. Bandera, S. Filippi, M. Felice, and M. Politi, “Virtual reality surgical planning for maxillofacial distraction osteogenesis: the role of reverse engineering rapid prototyping and cooperative work,” Journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery, vol. 65, iss. 6, pp. 1198-1208, 2007.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Robiony2007,
      author = {Robiony, M. and Salvo, I. and Costa, F. and Zerman, N. and Bazzocchi,
      M. and Toso, F. and Bandera, C. and Filippi, S. and Felice, M. and
      Politi, M.},
      title = {Virtual reality surgical planning for maxillofacial distraction osteogenesis:
      the role of reverse engineering rapid prototyping and cooperative
      work},
      journal = {Journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery},
      year = {2007},
      volume = {65},
      pages = {1198 - 1208},
      number = {6},
      file = {Robiony2007.pdf:Robiony2007.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0278-2391},
      keywords = {CMS, REV, RPP, SLR, SUR},
      owner = {Thomas},
      publisher = {Elsevier},
      timestamp = {2011.02.09}
    }
  • J. Ruppin, A. Popovic, M. Strauss, E. Spüntrup, A. Steiner, and C. Stoll, “Evaluation of the accuracy of three different computer-aided surgery systems in dental implantology: optical tracking vs. stereolithographic splint systems,” Clinical Oral Implants Research, vol. 19, iss. 7, pp. 709-716, 2008.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Ruppin2008,
      author = {Ruppin, J. and Popovic, A. and Strauss, M. and Sp{\\"u}ntrup, E.
      and Steiner, A. and Stoll, C.},
      title = {Evaluation of the accuracy of three different computer-aided surgery
      systems in dental implantology: optical tracking vs. stereolithographic
      splint systems},
      journal = {Clinical Oral Implants Research},
      year = {2008},
      volume = {19},
      pages = {709--716},
      number = {7},
      file = {Ruppin2008.pdf:Ruppin2008.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {1600-0501},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      publisher = {Wiley Online Library},
      timestamp = {2010.12.22}
    }
  • A. Saad, A. El-Bialy, A. Kandil, and A. S. Ahmed, “Automatic cephalometric analysis using active appearance model and simulated annealing,” , p. 51, 2006.
    [Bibtex]
    @CONFERENCE{Saad2006,
      author = {Saad, AA and El-Bialy, A. and Kandil, AH and Ahmed, A.S.},
      title = {Automatic cephalometric analysis using active appearance model and
      simulated annealing},
      booktitle = {The International Congress for global Science and Technology},
      year = {2006},
      pages = {51},
      file = {Saad2006.pdf:Saad2006.pdf:PDF},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2011.01.10}
    }
  • H. F. Sailer, P. E. Haers, C. P. E. Zollikofer, T. Warnke, F. R. Caris, and P. Stucki, “The value of stereolithographic models for preoperative diagnosis of craniofacial deformities and planning of surgical corrections,” International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, vol. 27, iss. 5, pp. 327-333, 1998.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Sailer1998,
      author = {H.F. Sailer and P.E. Haers and C.P.E. Zollikofer and T. Warnke and
      F.R. Caris and P. Stucki},
      title = {The value of stereolithographic models for preoperative diagnosis
      of craniofacial deformities and planning of surgical corrections},
      journal = {International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery},
      year = {1998},
      volume = {27},
      pages = {327 - 333},
      number = {5},
      abstract = {The purpose of this study was to assess the importance of stereolithographic
      models (SLMs) for preoperative diagnosis and planning in craniofacial
      surgery and to examine whether these models offer valuable additional
      information as compared to normal CT scans and 3D CT images. Craniofacial
      SLMs of 20 patients with craniomaxillofacial pathology were made.
      A helical volume CT scan of the anatomic area involved delivered
      the necessary data for their construction. These were built with
      an SLA 250 stereolithography apparatus (3D-Systems, Valencia, CA,
      USA), steered by FORM-IT/DCS® software (University of Zurich, Switzerland).
      The stereolithography models were classified according to pathology,
      type of surgery and their relevance for surgical planning. Though
      not objectively measurable, it was beyond doubt that relevant additional
      information for the surgeon was obtained in cases of hypertelorism,
      severe asymmetries of the neuro- and viscerocranium, complex cranial
      synostoses and large skull defects. The value of these models as
      realistic #duplicates# of complex or rare dysmorphic craniofacial
      pathology for the purpose of creating a didactic collection should
      also be emphasized. The models proved to be less useful in cases
      of consolidated fractures of the periorbital and naso-ethmoidal complex,
      except where there was major dislocation.},
      file = {Sailer1998.pdf:Sailer1998.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0901-5027},
      keywords = {craniofacial surgery, CMS, RPP},
      owner = {Thomas},
      timestamp = {2011.02.07}
    }
  • A. Sarti, R. Gori, and C. Lamberti, “A physically based model to simulate maxillo-facial surgery from 3D CT images,” Future Generations in Computer Systems, vol. 15, iss. 2, pp. 217-222, 1999.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Sarti1999,
      author = {Sarti, A. and Gori, R. and Lamberti, C.},
      title = {A physically based model to simulate maxillo-facial surgery from
      3D CT images},
      journal = {Future Generations in Computer Systems},
      year = {1999},
      volume = {15},
      pages = {217 - 222},
      number = {2},
      file = {Sarti1999.pdf:Sarti1999.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0167-739X},
      owner = {Thomas},
      publisher = {Amsterdam, Netherlands; New York, NY: North-Holland Pub. Co.,; New
      York, NY: For customers in the USA and Canada, Elsevier Science Pub.
      Co., 1984-},
      timestamp = {2011.02.08}
    }
  • H. Seitz, C. Tille, S. Irsen, G. Bermes, R. Sader, and H. Zeilhofer, “Rapid Prototyping models for surgical planning with hard and soft tissue representation,” International Congress Series, vol. 1268, pp. 567-572, 2004.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Seitz2004,
      author = {Seitz, H and Tille, C and Irsen, S and Bermes, G and Sader, R and
      Zeilhofer, H},
      title = {Rapid Prototyping models for surgical planning with hard and soft
      tissue representation},
      journal = {International Congress Series},
      year = {2004},
      volume = {1268},
      pages = {567 - 572},
      month = {June},
      abstract = {This paper presents a new approach to build medical models for surgical
      planning with realistic haptic and optical representation of different
      types of tissue. This new kind of combined anatomical models is realized
      by applying different Rapid Prototyping (RP) techniques. Based on
      medical datasets, preferably computer tomography (CT) scans of the
      affected region, both soft and hard tissue structures are reconstructed.
      A stereolithography apparatus builds the hard tissue models and the
      vacuum casting technique allows to manufacture realistic representations
      of soft tissues.},
      file = {Seitz2004.pdf:Seitz2004.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {05315131},
      keywords = {combined anatomical models,rapid prototyping,surgical planning, RPP,
      CMS},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.10.25}
    }
  • S. Singare, Q. Lian, W. P. Wang, J. Wang, Y. Liu, D. Li, and B. Lu, “Rapid prototyping assisted surgery planning and custom implant design,” Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 15, iss. 1, pp. 19-23, 2009.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Singare2009,
      author = {Singare, Sekou and Lian, Qin and Wang, Wei Ping and Wang, Jue and
      Liu, Yaxiong and Li, Dichen and Lu, Bingheng},
      title = {Rapid prototyping assisted surgery planning and custom implant design},
      journal = {Rapid Prototyping Journal},
      year = {2009},
      volume = {15},
      pages = {19 - 23},
      number = {1},
      abstract = {Purpose – This paper aims to describe computer-aided design and rapid
      prototyping (RP) systems for the preoperative planning and fabrication
      of custom-made implant. Design/methodology/approach – A patient with
      mandible defect underwent reconstruction using custom-made implant.
      3D models of the patient’s skull are generated based on computed
      tomography image data. After evaluation of the 3D reconstructed image,
      it was identified that some bone fragment was moved due to the missing
      segment. During the implant design process, the correct position
      of the bone fragment was defined and the geometry of the custom-made
      implant was generated based on mirror image technique and is fabricated
      by a RP machine. Surgical approach such as preoperative planning
      and simulation of surgical procedures was performed using the fabricated
      skull models and custom-made implant. Findings – Results show that
      the stereolithography model provided an accurate tool for preoperative,
      surgical simulation. Research limitations/implications – The methods
      described above suffer from the expensive cost of RP technique. Practical
      implications – This method allows accurate fabrication of the implant.
      The advantages of using this technique are that the physical model
      of the implant is fitted on the skull model so that the surgeon can
      plan and rehearse the surgery in advance and a less invasive surgical
      procedure and less time-consuming reconstructive and an adequate
      esthetic can result. Originality/value – The method improves the
      reconstructive surgery and reduces the risk of a second intervention,
      and the psychological stress of the patient will be eliminated.},
      file = {Singare2009.pdf:Singare2009.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {1355-2546},
      keywords = {body regions,computer-aided design,paper type research paper,rapid
      prototypes, CMS, APP, SUR, PLA, RPP},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.10.25}
    }
  • T. Sohmura, H. Hojo, M. Nakajima, K. Wakabayashi, M. Nagao, S. Iida, T. Kitagawa, M. Kogo, T. Kojima, K. Matsumura, T. Nakamura, and J. Takahashi, “Prototype of simulation of orthognathic surgery using a virtual reality haptic device.,” International journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery, vol. 33, iss. 8, pp. 740-50, 2004.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Sohmura2004,
      author = {Sohmura, T and Hojo, H and Nakajima, M and Wakabayashi, K and Nagao,
      M and Iida, S and Kitagawa, T and Kogo, M and Kojima, T and Matsumura,
      K and Nakamura, T and Takahashi, J},
      title = {Prototype of simulation of orthognathic surgery using a virtual reality
      haptic device.},
      journal = {International journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery},
      year = {2004},
      volume = {33},
      pages = {740 - 50},
      number = {8},
      month = {December},
      abstract = {A maxillofacial simulator can support education and training. In the
      present study, cutting, separation, and quantitative rearrangement
      of bone during orthognathic surgery were simulated by means of a
      haptic device with virtual tactile perception. Computed tomographic
      (CT) images of two patients with severe jaw deformity, one women
      and one man, were input into the device. In the woman, Le Fort I
      osteotomy of the maxilla and sagittal splitting ramus osteotomy of
      the mandible were initially simulated. During surgery with the haptic
      device, separation and rearrangement of the maxilla and the ramus
      of the mandible were initially processed. However, there was discrepancy
      and overlapping of the ramus with the mandible. Intraoral vertical
      osteotomy of the right ramus was then performed, with satisfactory
      results and less discrepancy and interference. The simulation was
      referred to at surgery, and satisfactory surgical assistance was
      postoperatively confirmed on CT images. The male patient had severe
      jaw deformity due to unequal growth between the ramuses, resulting
      in anterior crossbite. Sagittal splitting ramus osteotomy with rotation
      of the mandible was successfully simulated. Because of its versatility
      and functions, the present device was found to be useful for simulating
      various procedures for orthognathic surgery and thereby three-dimensionally
      determine surgical movements.},
      file = {Sohmura2004.pdf:Sohmura2004.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0901-5027},
      keywords = {Adult,Computer Simulation,Dental Occlusion,Facial Asymmetry,Facial
      Asymmetry: surgery,Female,Humans,Imaging, Three-Dimensional,Male,Malocclusion,Malocclusion:
      surgery,Mandible,Mandible: surgery,Maxilla,Maxilla: surgery,Models,
      Biological,Osteotomy,Osteotomy, Le Fort,Osteotomy, Le Fort: methods,Osteotomy:
      methods,Patient Care Planning,Prognathism,Prognathism: surgery,Rotation,Tomography,
      X-Ray Computed,Touch,User-Computer Interface, APP, CMS, PLA, SUR},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      pmid = {15556320},
      timestamp = {2010.10.25}
    }
  • G. R. J. Swennen, W. Mollemans, and F. Schutyser, “Three-dimensional treatment planning of orthognathic surgery in the era of virtual imaging.,” Journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery : official journal of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, vol. 67, iss. 10, pp. 2080-92, 2009.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Swennen2009,
      author = {Swennen, Gwen R J and Mollemans, Wouter and Schutyser, Filip},
      title = {Three-dimensional treatment planning of orthognathic surgery in the
      era of virtual imaging.},
      journal = {Journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery : official journal of the
      American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons},
      year = {2009},
      volume = {67},
      pages = {2080 - 92},
      number = {10},
      month = {October},
      abstract = {PURPOSE: The aim of this report was to present an integrated 3-dimensional
      (3D) virtual approach toward cone-beam computed tomography-based
      treatment planning of orthognathic surgery in the clinical routine.
      MATERIALS AND METHODS: We have described the different stages of
      the workflow process for routine 3D virtual treatment planning of
      orthognathic surgery: 1) image acquisition for 3D virtual orthognathic
      surgery; 2) processing of acquired image data toward a 3D virtual
      augmented model of the patient's head; 3) 3D virtual diagnosis of
      the patient; 4) 3D virtual treatment planning of orthognathic surgery;
      5) 3D virtual treatment planning communication; 6) 3D splint manufacturing;
      7) 3D virtual treatment planning transfer to the operating room;
      and 8) 3D virtual treatment outcome evaluation. CONCLUSIONS: The
      potential benefits and actual limits of an integrated 3D virtual
      approach for the treatment of the patient with a maxillofacial deformity
      are discussed comprehensively from our experience using 3D virtual
      treatment planning clinically.},
      file = {Swennen2009.pdf:Swennen2009.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {1531-5053},
      keywords = {Algorithms,Cephalometry,Cephalometry: methods,Communication,Computer
      Graphics,Computer Simulation,Computer-Aided Design,Cone-Beam Computed
      Tomography,Cone-Beam Computed Tomography: methods,Humans,Image Processing,
      Computer-Assisted,Image Processing, Computer-Assisted: methods,Imaging,
      Three-Dimensional,Imaging, Three-Dimensional: methods,Internet,Jaw,Jaw:
      surgery,Maxillofacial Abnormalities,Maxillofacial Abnormalities:
      radiography,Maxillofacial Abnormalities: surgery,Models, Anatomic,Orthodontics,
      Corrective,Osteotomy,Osteotomy: methods,Patient Care Planning,Splints,Surgery,
      Computer-Assisted,Treatment Outcome,User-Computer Interface, VOR,
      SUR, APP, CMS, PLA, RPP},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      pmid = {19761902},
      publisher = {Elsevier Inc.},
      timestamp = {2010.10.25}
    }
  • M. Terajima, A. Nakasima, Y. Aoki, T. Goto, K. Tokumori, N. Mori, and Y. Hoshino, “A 3-dimensional method for analyzing the morphology of patients with maxillofacial deformities,” American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, vol. 136, iss. 6, pp. 857-867, 2009.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Terajima2009,
      author = {Masahiko Terajima and Akihiko Nakasima and Yoshimitsu Aoki and Tazuko
      K. Goto and Kenji Tokumori and Noriko Mori and Yoshihiro Hoshino},
      title = {A 3-dimensional method for analyzing the morphology of patients with
      maxillofacial deformities},
      journal = {American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics},
      year = {2009},
      volume = {136},
      pages = {857 - 867},
      number = {6},
      abstract = {Introduction Traditionally, cephalograms have been used to evaluate
      a patient's maxillofacial skeleton and facial soft-tissue morphology.
      However, magnification and distortion of the cephalograms make detailed
      morphologic analysis difficult in patients with complex deformities.
      The purpose of this article was to introduce a new method for visualizing
      deformation and deviation of the maxillofacial skeleton and facial
      soft tissues.Methods Standard 3-dimensional Japanese head models
      were sized to match the sella-to-nasion distance obtained from 2
      patients' (1 man, 1 woman) maxillofacial skeletal images. Then, the
      scaled standard model was superimposed on each patient's 3-dimensional
      computed tomography image.Results This system provided clear shape
      information independent of size and facilitated the visualization
      of shape variations in maxillofacial skeletal and facial soft-tissue
      morphology.Conclusions This method will be useful for 3-dimensional
      morphologic analysis of patients with jaw deformities.},
      file = {Terajima2009.pdf:Terajima2009.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0889-5406},
      keywords = {TEC},
      owner = {Thomas},
      timestamp = {2011.02.09}
    }
  • M. Troulis, P. Everett, E. Seldin, R. Kikinis, and L. Kaban, “Development of a three-dimensional treatment planning system based on computed tomographic data,” International journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery, vol. 31, iss. 4, pp. 349-357, 2002.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Troulis2002,
      author = {Troulis, MJ and Everett, P. and Seldin, EB and Kikinis, R. and Kaban,
      LB},
      title = {Development of a three-dimensional treatment planning system based
      on computed tomographic data},
      journal = {International journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery},
      year = {2002},
      volume = {31},
      pages = {349 - 357},
      number = {4},
      file = {Troulis2002.pdf:Troulis2002.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0901-5027},
      keywords = {APP, CMS, PLA, OCS, PRS},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      publisher = {Elsevier},
      timestamp = {2011.01.10}
    }
  • E. Vezzetti, F. Calignano, and S. Moos, “Computer-aided morphological analysis for maxillo-facial diagnostic: a preliminary study,” Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery, vol. 63, iss. 2, pp. 218-226, 2010.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Vezzetti2010,
      author = {Enrico Vezzetti and Flaviana Calignano and Sandro Moos},
      title = {Computer-aided morphological analysis for maxillo-facial diagnostic:
      a preliminary study},
      journal = {Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive \& Aesthetic Surgery},
      year = {2010},
      volume = {63},
      pages = {218 - 226},
      number = {2},
      abstract = {Summary This article compares most of the three-dimensional (3D) morphometric
      methods currently proposed by the technical literature to evaluate
      their morphological informative value, while applying them to a case
      study of five patients affected by the malocclusion pathology. The
      compared methods are: conventional cephalometric analysis (CCA),
      generalised Procrustes superimposition (GPS) with principal-components
      analysis (PCA), thin-plate spline analysis (TPS), multisectional
      spline (MS) and clearance vector mapping (CVM). The results show
      that MS provides more reliable and useful diagnostic information.},
      file = {Vezzetti2010.pdf:Vezzetti2010.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {1748-6815},
      keywords = {3D Scanner, REV},
      owner = {Thomas},
      timestamp = {2011.02.14}
    }
  • S. Wang and J. Yang, “Efficient collision detection for soft tissue simulation in a surgical planning system,” in Computer-Aided Design and Computer Graphics, 2009. CAD/Graphics ’09. 11th IEEE International Conference on, 2009, pp. 49-53.
    [Bibtex]
    @INPROCEEDINGS{Wang2009,
      author = {Shengzheng Wang and Jie Yang},
      title = {Efficient collision detection for soft tissue simulation in a surgical
      planning system},
      booktitle = {Computer-Aided Design and Computer Graphics, 2009. CAD/Graphics '09.
      11th IEEE International Conference on},
      year = {2009},
      pages = {49 -53},
      month = {August},
      abstract = {In the field of cranio-maxillofacial surgery, there is a huge demand
      from surgeons to be able to automatically predict the post-operative
      face appearance in terms of a pre-specified bone-remodeling plan.
      Collision detection is a promising means to achieve this simulation.
      In this paper, therefore, an efficient collision detection method
      based on a new 3D signed distance field algorithm is proposed to
      accurately detect the contact positions and compute the penetration
      depth with the moving of the bones in the simulation, and thus the
      contact force between the bones and the soft tissues can be estimated
      using penalty methods. Thereafter, a nonlinear finite element model
      is employed to compute the deformation of the soft tissue model.
      The performance of the proposed collision detection algorithm has
      been improved in memory requirements and computational efficiency
      against the conventional methods. In addition, the proposed approach
      has the superior convergence characteristics against other methods.
      Therefore, the usage of the collision detection method can effectively
      assist surgeons in automatically predicting the pos-operative face
      outline.},
      file = {Wang2009.pdf:Wang2009.pdf:PDF},
      keywords = {3D signed distance field algorithm;bone-remodeling planing;collision
      detection algorithm;convergence characteristics;cranio-maxillofacial
      surgery;nonlinear finite element model;penetration depth computation;soft
      tissue simulation;surgical planning system;biomechanics;bone;convergence;deformation;finite
      element analysis;medical computing;physiological models;surgery;,
      CMS, OCS, PLA, TEC},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.11.02}
    }
  • T. Weingärtner, U. Rembold, and R. Dillmann, “Simulation of jaw-movements for the musculoskeletal diagnoses,” , 1997.
    [Bibtex]
    @CONFERENCE{Weingartner1997,
      author = {Weing{\\"a}rtner, T. and Rembold, U. and Dillmann, R.},
      title = {Simulation of jaw-movements for the musculoskeletal diagnoses},
      booktitle = {In Medicine Meets Virtual Reality 5},
      year = {1997},
      organization = {Citeseer},
      owner = {Thomas},
      timestamp = {2011.02.04}
    }
  • A. Westermark, S. Zachow, and B. L. Eppley, “Three-dimensional osteotomy planning in maxillofacial surgery including soft tissue prediction,” Journal of Craniofacial Surgery, vol. 16, iss. 1, p. 100, 2005.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Westermark2005,
      author = {Westermark, A. and Zachow, S. and Eppley, B.L.},
      title = {Three-dimensional osteotomy planning in maxillofacial surgery including
      soft tissue prediction},
      journal = {Journal of Craniofacial Surgery},
      year = {2005},
      volume = {16},
      pages = {100},
      number = {1},
      abstract = {Preoperative planning of complex osteotomies in craniomaxillofacial
      surgery, in conjunction with a surgeon’s expertise, is essential
      for achieving an optimal result. However, the soft tissue changes
      that accompany facial bone movements cannot yet be accurately predicted.
      Bony tissue, because of its greater density, can be better predicted,
      but it alone does not account for the final aesthetic result. A new
      approach using not only three-dimensional (3-D) surface models of
      the patient’s anatomy, but also a corresponding volumetric model,
      is dis-
      
      cussed. This 3-D planning software was used in the treatment of 15
      patients and was found to provide a good correlation between simulation
      and postoperative outcome.},
      file = {Westermark2005.pdf:Westermark2005.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {1049-2275},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2011.01.03}
    }
  • J. J. Xia, C. V. Phillips, J. Gateno, J. F. Teichgraeber, A. M. Christensen, M. J. Gliddon, J. J. Lemoine, and M. A. K. Liebschner, “Cost-Effectiveness Analysis for Computer-Aided Surgical Simulation in Complex Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery,” Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, vol. 64, iss. 12, pp. 1780-1784, 2006.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Xia2006,
      author = {James J. Xia and Carl V. Phillips and Jaime Gateno and John F. Teichgraeber
      and Andrew M. Christensen and Michael J. Gliddon and Jeremy J. Lemoine
      and Michael A.K. Liebschner},
      title = {Cost-Effectiveness Analysis for Computer-Aided Surgical Simulation
      in Complex Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery},
      journal = {Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery},
      year = {2006},
      volume = {64},
      pages = {1780 - 1784},
      number = {12},
      abstract = {Purpose The purpose of this study is to assess the costs and benefits
      of computer-aided surgical simulation (CASS) and to compare it with
      the current surgical planning methods for complex cranio-maxillofacial
      (CMF) surgery.Materials and Methods The comparison of methods applies
      to all CMF surgeries where the patient's condition is severe enough
      to undergo a computed tomography scan and a stereolithographic model
      is necessary for the surgical planning process. The costs for each
      method can be divided into time and other costs. The time was estimated
      based on the authors' experience as well as on a survey of a small
      group of 6 experienced CMF surgeons in the United States. The other
      costs were estimated based on the authors' experience.Results CASS
      has lower costs in terms of surgeon time, patient time, and material
      costs. Specifically, total surgeon hours spent in planning are 5.25
      hours compared with 9.75 for current standard methods. Material and
      scanning costs are $1,900 for CASS compared with about $3,510 for
      standard methods. Patient time for planning is reduced from 4.75
      hours to 2.25 hours with CASS. The reduction in both time and other
      costs remains when the fixed fee costs of CASS are added to the variable
      costs. Amortized across the 600 patients per year (1,800 for the
      assumed 3-year life of the training and software), this adds only
      a few dollars and a fraction of an hour per surgery. Even in the
      case of a small clinic when the cost is amortized for 6 patients
      per year (18 patients for the assumed 3-year life of the training
      and software), the per surgery costs (9.65 hours and $2,456) will
      still favor CASS.Conclusion Any great new design should consist of
      at least 2 of the 3 following features: faster, cheaper, and better
      outcome. This analysis demonstrates that CASS is faster and less
      costly than the current standard planning methods for complex CMF
      surgery. Previous studies have also shown that CASS results in better
      surgical outcomes. Thus, in all regards, CASS appears to be at least
      as good as the current methods of surgical planning.},
      file = {Xia2006.pdf:Xia2006.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0278-2391},
      owner = {Thomas},
      timestamp = {2011.02.08}
    }
  • T. Yasuda, Y. Hashimoto, S. Yokoi, and J. I. Toriwaki, “Computer system for craniofacial surgical planning based on CT images,” Medical Imaging, IEEE Transactions on, vol. 9, iss. 3, pp. 270-280, 2002.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Yasuda2002,
      author = {Yasuda, T. and Hashimoto, Y. and Yokoi, S. and Toriwaki, J.I.},
      title = {Computer system for craniofacial surgical planning based on CT images},
      journal = {Medical Imaging, IEEE Transactions on},
      year = {2002},
      volume = {9},
      pages = {270 - 280},
      number = {3},
      file = {Yasuda2002.pdf:Yasuda2002.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0278 - 0062},
      owner = {Thomas},
      publisher = {IEEE},
      timestamp = {2011.02.08}
    }
  • S. Zachow, E. Gladilin, R. Sader, and H. F. Zeilhofer, “Draw and cut: intuitive 3D osteotomy planning on polygonal bone models,” , vol. 1256, pp. 362-369, 2003.
    [Bibtex]
    @CONFERENCE{Zachow2003,
      author = {Zachow, S. and Gladilin, E. and Sader, R. and Zeilhofer, H.F.},
      title = {Draw and cut: intuitive 3D osteotomy planning on polygonal bone models},
      booktitle = {International Congress Series},
      year = {2003},
      volume = {1256},
      pages = {362 - 369},
      organization = {Elsevier},
      file = {Zachow2003.pdf:Zachow2003.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0531-5131},
      keywords = {APP, CMS, PLA, SUR},
      owner = {Thomas},
      timestamp = {2011.02.08}
    }
  • S. Zachow, E. Gladilin, H. Zeilhofer, and R. Sader, “Improved 3D Osteotomy Planning in Cranio-maxillofacial Surgery,” Computing, pp. 473-481, 2001.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Zachow2001,
      author = {Zachow, Stefan and Gladilin, Evgeny and Zeilhofer, Hans-florian and
      Sader, Robert},
      title = {Improved 3D Osteotomy Planning in Cranio-maxillofacial Surgery},
      journal = {Computing},
      year = {2001},
      pages = {473-481},
      abstract = {In this paper we present two clinical cases in maxillofacial surgery,
      where complex surgical interventions have been pre-operatively planned
      on 3D models of the patients’ heads. Our goal was to provide surgeons
      with an addi- tional planning criterion, i.e. the prediction of the
      post-operative facial appear- ance. In our first study a two step
      mandibular distraction has been planned, and in the second one a
      bimaxillary operation with a high Le Fort I osteotomy of the maxilla
      according toBell, as well as a sagittal split osteotomy on both sides
      of the mandible, according to Obwegeser–Dal Pont. Within our study
      we did focus on the three dimensional soft tissue simulation using
      finite element methods. For the provision of such a planning aid,
      concepts for an integrated 3D surgery planning system are proposed
      that are partially implemented and demonstrated.},
      file = {Zachow2001.pdf:Zachow2001.pdf:PDF},
      keywords = {computer-assisted cranio-maxillofacial surgery,finite-element methods,osteodistraction,osteotomy,soft
      tissue prediction, APP, CMS, VOR, SUR, PLA},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.10.25}
    }
  • S. Zachow, H. C. Hege, and P. Deuflhard, “Computer assisted planning in cranio-maxillofacial surgery,” Journal of Computing and Information Technology, vol. 14, iss. 1, p. 53, 2004.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Zachow2004a,
      author = {Zachow, S. and Hege, H.C. and Deuflhard, P.},
      title = {Computer assisted planning in cranio-maxillofacial surgery},
      journal = {Journal of Computing and Information Technology},
      year = {2004},
      volume = {14},
      pages = {53},
      number = {1},
      file = {Zachow2004a.pdf:Zachow2004a.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {1846-3908},
      owner = {Thomas},
      timestamp = {2011.02.08}
    }
  • S. Zachow, T. Hierl, and B. Erdmann, “A quantitative evaluation of 3D soft tissue prediction in maxillofacial surgery planning,” Proc. 3. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft f\ür Computerund Roboter-assistierte Chirurgie (curac), pp. 75-79, 2004.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Zachow2004b,
      author = {Zachow, S. and Hierl, T. and Erdmann, B.},
      title = {A quantitative evaluation of 3D soft tissue prediction in maxillofacial
      surgery planning},
      journal = {Proc. 3. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft f{\\"u}r Computerund
      Roboter-assistierte Chirurgie (curac)},
      year = {2004},
      pages = {75 - 79},
      file = {Zachow2004b.pdf:Zachow2004b.pdf:PDF},
      owner = {Thomas},
      timestamp = {2011.02.08}
    }

Reviews

  • R. Ewers, K. Schicho, G. Undt, F. Wanschitz, M. Truppe, R. Seemann, and a Wagner, “Basic research and 12 years of clinical experience in computer-assisted navigation technology: a review.,” International journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery, vol. 34, iss. 1, pp. 1-8, 2005.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Ewers2005,
      author = {Ewers, R and Schicho, K and Undt, G and Wanschitz, F and Truppe,
      M and Seemann, R and Wagner, a},
      title = {Basic research and 12 years of clinical experience in computer-assisted
      navigation technology: a review.},
      journal = {International journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery},
      year = {2005},
      volume = {34},
      pages = {1-8},
      number = {1},
      month = {January},
      abstract = {Computer-aided surgical navigation technology is commonly used in
      craniomaxillofacial surgery. It offers substantial improvement regarding
      esthetic and functional aspects in a range of surgical procedures.
      Based on augmented reality principles, where the real operative site
      is merged with computer generated graphic information, computer-aided
      navigation systems were employed, among other procedures, in dental
      implantology, arthroscopy of the temporomandibular joint, osteotomies,
      distraction osteogenesis, image guided biopsies and removals of foreign
      bodies. The decision to perform a procedure with or without computer-aided
      intraoperative navigation depends on the expected benefit to the
      procedure as well as on the technical expenditure necessary to achieve
      that goal. This paper comprises the experience gained in 12 years
      of research, development and routine clinical application. One hundred
      and fifty-eight operations with successful application of surgical
      navigation technology--divided into five groups--are evaluated regarding
      the criteria "medical benefit" and "technical expenditure" necessary
      to perform these procedures. Our results indicate that the medical
      benefit is likely to outweight the expenditure of technology with
      few exceptions (calvaria transplant, resection of the temporal bone,
      reconstruction of the orbital floor). Especially in dental implantology,
      specialized software reduces time and additional costs necessary
      to plan and perform procedures with computer-aided surgical navigation.},
      file = {Ewers2005.pdf:Ewers2005.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0901-5027},
      keywords = {Computer Graphics,Dental Research,Humans,Imaging, Three-Dimensional,Oral
      Surgical Procedures,Oral Surgical Procedures: methods,Surgery, Computer-Assisted,Technology,
      High-Cost,User-Computer Interface, REV, CMS},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      pmid = {15617960},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • S. Hassfeld and J. Mühling, “Computer assisted oral and maxillofacial surgery – a review and an assessment of technology,” International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, vol. 30, iss. 1, pp. 2-13, 2001.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Hassfeld2001,
      author = {Stefan Hassfeld and Joachim Mühling},
      title = {Computer assisted oral and maxillofacial surgery - a review and an
      assessment of technology},
      journal = {International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery},
      year = {2001},
      volume = {30},
      pages = {2 - 13},
      number = {1},
      abstract = {Abstract. Advances in the basic scientific research within the field
      of computer assisted oral and maxillofacial surgery have enabled
      us to introduce features of these techniques into routine clinical
      practice. In order to simulate complex surgery with the aid of a
      computer, the diagnostic image data and especially various imaging
      modalities including computer tomography (CT), magnetic resonance
      imaging (MRI) and Ultrasound (US) must be arranged in relation to
      each other, thus enabling a rapid switching between the various modalities
      as well as the viewing of superimposed images. Segmenting techniques
      for the reconstruction of three-dimensional representations of soft
      and hard tissues are required. We must develop ergonomic and user
      friendly interactive methods for the surgeon, thus allowing for a
      precise and fast entry of the planned surgical procedure in the planning
      and simulation phase. During the surgical phase, instrument navigation
      tools offer the surgeon interactive support through operation guidance
      and control of potential dangers. This feature is already available
      today and within this article we present a review of the development
      of this rapidly evolving technique. Future intraoperative assistance
      takes the form of such passive tools for the support of intraoperative
      orientation as well as so-called [`]tracking systems' (semi-active
      systems) which accompany and support the surgeons' work. The final
      form are robots which execute specific steps completely autonomously.
      The techniques of virtual reality and computer assisted surgery are
      increasingly important in their medical applications. Many applications
      are still being developed or are still in the form of a prototype.
      It is already clear, however, that developments in this area will
      have a considerable effect on a surgeon's routine work.},
      file = {Hassfeld2001.pdf:Hassfeld2001.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0901-5027},
      keywords = {computer assisted surgery; operation planning; surgery simulation;
      image guided surgery; navigation systems; medical robotics; review,
      CMS, REV},
      owner = {Thomas},
      timestamp = {2011.02.02}
    }

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