Hepatic Surgery

References

  • H. Bourquain, A. Schenk, F. Link, B. Preim, G. Prause, and H. Peitgen, “HepaVision2: A software assistant for preoperative planning in living-related liver transplantation and oncologic liver surgery,” Computer Assisted Radiology and Surgery (CARS 2002), pp. 341-346, 2002.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Bourquain2002,
      author = {Bourquain, H. and Schenk, A. and Link, F. and Preim, B. and Prause,
      G. and Peitgen, HO},
      title = {HepaVision2: A software assistant for preoperative planning in living-related
      liver transplantation and oncologic liver surgery},
      journal = {Computer Assisted Radiology and Surgery (CARS 2002)},
      year = {2002},
      pages = {341--346},
      abstract = {HepaVision2, a user friendly software application for preoperative
      planning based on CT images in liver surgery is presented. It is
      intended for both, evaluation of potential donors in living-related
      liver transplantation and planning of oncologic resections. The planning
      takes into account the patient’s individual anatomy allowing for
      fully automatic calculation of individual resection proposals including
      volumetric analysis. The results are visualized in 3D, thus allowing
      the surgeon to choose the optimal strategy for each patient. The
      software was tested in over 50 cases by our clinical partners and
      our institution. Average time needed per case is below one hour,
      therefore allowing the use of the software application in clinical
      routine.},
      file = {Bourquain2002.pdf:Bourquain2002.pdf:PDF},
      keywords = {PLA, VOR, HES},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      publisher = {Citeseer},
      timestamp = {2010.11.18}
    }
  • G. Chen, X. Li, G. Wu, Y. Wang, B. Fang, X. Xiong, R. Yang, L. Tan, S. Zhang, and J. Dong, “The use of virtual reality for the functional simulation of hepatic tumors (case control study).,” International journal of surgery (London, England), vol. 8, iss. 1, pp. 72-8, 2010.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Chen2010,
      author = {Chen, Gang and Li, Xue-cheng and Wu, Guo-qing and Wang, Yi and Fang,
      Bin and Xiong, Xiao-feng and Yang, Ri-gao and Tan, Li-wen and Zhang,
      Shao-xiang and Dong, Jia-hong},
      title = {The use of virtual reality for the functional simulation of hepatic
      tumors (case control study).},
      journal = {International journal of surgery (London, England)},
      year = {2010},
      volume = {8},
      pages = {72-8},
      number = {1},
      month = {January},
      abstract = {OBJECTIVE: To develop a technique for converting computed tomography
      (CT) data into a fully three-dimensional (3D) virtual reality (VR)
      environment. Preoperative simulation in 3D VR facilitates liver resection
      owing to the ability to view the tumor and its relative vessels.
      METHODS: 3D-reconstruction of the liver was restored from spiral
      CT data by using LiVirtue software and the Dextrobeam (Volume Interactions
      Pte Ltd, Singapore) was applied to view this 3D model in the VR environment.
      In order to design a rational plan of operation, the liver and its
      anatomic structure were reconstructed to illuminate the location
      of the tumor and its related vessels. RESULTS: In our series of 38
      hepatic resections, there was no significant difference between preoperatively
      calculated volumes of virtual resection part and actual volumes of
      resected specimen's weight. The LiVirtue can provide accurate and
      rapid results of individual hepatic volume and the character of anatomy
      structures. These models can be viewed and manipulated in the VR
      environment and on a personal computer. This preoperative simulation
      allowed surgeons to dissect the liver with reduced complications.
      Preoperative planning and intra-operative navigation based on this
      technique ensured the safety of liver resection. CONCLUSIONS: 3D
      models of the liver and its detailed structure articulate the possibility
      of intricate liver resection and the risk of the operation. This
      preoperative estimation from a 3D model of the liver benefits complicated
      liver resections greatly.},
      file = {Chen2010.pdf:Chen2010.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {1743-9159},
      keywords = {Adult,Case-Control Studies,Contrast Media,Female,Humans,Image Processing,
      Computer-Assisted,Imaging, Three-Dimensional,Iohexol,Iohexol: diagnostic
      use,Liver Neoplasms,Liver Neoplasms: radiography,Liver Neoplasms:
      surgery,Male,Middle Aged,Software,Tomography, X-Ray Computed,User-Computer
      Interface, APP, PLA, GUI, VOR, SUR, HES, HES},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      pmid = {19944191},
      publisher = {Elsevier Ltd},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • M. Feuerstein, T. Mussack, S. M. Heining, and N. Navab, “Intraoperative Laparoscope Augmentation for Port Placement and Resection Planning in Minimally Invasive Liver Resection,” Medical Imaging, IEEE Transactions on, vol. 27, iss. 3, pp. 355-369, 2008.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Feuerstein2008,
      author = {Feuerstein, M. and Mussack, T. and Heining, S.M. and Navab, N.},
      title = {Intraoperative Laparoscope Augmentation for Port Placement and Resection
      Planning in Minimally Invasive Liver Resection},
      journal = {Medical Imaging, IEEE Transactions on},
      year = {2008},
      volume = {27},
      pages = {355 - 369},
      number = {3},
      month = {March},
      abstract = {In recent years, an increasing number of liver tumor indications were
      treated by minimally invasive laparoscopic resection. Besides the
      restricted view, two major intraoperative issues in laparoscopic
      liver resection are the optimal planning of ports as well as the
      enhanced visualization of (hidden) vessels, which supply the tumorous
      liver segment and thus need to be divided (e.g., clipped) prior to
      the resection. We propose an intuitive and precise method to plan
      the placement of ports. Pre operatively, self-adhesive fiducials
      are affixed to the patient's skin and a computed tomography (CT)
      data set is acquired while contrasting the liver vessels. Immediately
      prior to the intervention, the laparoscope is moved around these
      fiducials, which are automatically reconstructed to register the
      patient to its preoperative imaging data set. This enables the simulation
      of a camera flight through the patient's interior along the laparoscope's
      or instruments' axes to easily validate potential ports. Intraoperatively,
      surgeons need to update their surgical planning based on actual patient
      data after organ deformations mainly caused by application of carbon
      dioxide pneumoperitoneum. Therefore, preoperative imaging data can
      hardly be used. Instead, we propose to use an optically tracked mobile
      C-arm providing cone-beam CT imaging capability intraoperatively.
      After patient positioning, port placement, and carbon dioxide insufflation,
      the liver vessels are contrasted and a 3-D volume is reconstructed
      during patient exhalation. Without any further need for patient registration,
      the reconstructed volume can be directly augmented on the live laparoscope
      video, since prior calibration enables both the volume and the laparoscope
      to be positioned and oriented in the tracking coordinate frame. The
      augmentation provides the surgeon with advanced visual aid for the
      localization of veins, arteries, and bile ducts to be divided or
      sealed.},
      file = {:Feuerstein2008.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0278-0062},
      keywords = {3D volume reconstruction;arteries;bile ducts;carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum;computed
      tomography;intraoperative laparoscope augmentation;liver tumor;minimally
      invasive liver resection;port placement;resection planning;surgical
      planning;veins;computerised tomography;liver;surgery;tumours;Animals;Equipment
      Design;Equipment Failure Analysis;Hepatectomy;Humans;Laparoscopes;Preoperative
      Care;Surgery, Computer-Assisted;Surgical Procedures, Minimally Invasive;Swine;Tomography,
      X-Ray Computed;User-Computer Interface;, HES, APP, GUI, AUR, SUR,
      VOR},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.11.02}
    }
  • M. Feuerstein, T. Mussack, S. M. Heining, and N. Navab, “Registration-free laparoscope augmentation for intra-operative liver resection planning,” Proceedings of SPIE, p. 650915-650915–8, 2007.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Feuerstein2007,
      author = {Feuerstein, Marco and Mussack, Thomas and Heining, Sandro M. and
      Navab, Nassir},
      title = {Registration-free laparoscope augmentation for intra-operative liver
      resection planning},
      journal = {Proceedings of SPIE},
      year = {2007},
      pages = {650915-650915--8},
      abstract = {In recent years, an increasing number of liver tumor indications were
      treated by minimally invasive laparoscopic resection. Besides the
      restricted view, a major issue in laparoscopic liver resection is
      the enhanced visualization of (hidden) vessels, which supply the
      tumorous liver segment and thus need to be divided prior to the resection.
      To navigate the surgeon to these vessels, pre-operative abdominal
      imaging data can hardly be used due to intra- operative organ deformations
      mainly caused by appliance of carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum and
      respiratory motion. While regular respiratory motion can be gated
      and synchronized intra-operatively, motion caused by pneumoperitoneum
      is individual for every patient and difficult to estimate. Therefore,
      we propose to use an optically tracked mobile C-arm providing cone-beam
      CT imaging capability intra- operatively. The C-arm is able to visualize
      soft tissue by means of its new flat panel detector and is calibrated
      offline to relate its current position and orientation to the coordinate
      system of a reconstructed volume. Also the laparoscope is optically
      tracked and calibrated offline, so both laparoscope and C-arm are
      registered in the same tracking coordinate system. Intra-operatively,
      after patient positioning, port placement, and carbon dioxide insufflation,
      the liver vessels are contrasted and scanned during patient exhalation.
      Immediately, a three-dimensional volume is reconstructed. Without
      any further need for patient registration, the volume can be directly
      augmented on the live laparoscope video, visualizing the contrasted
      vessels. This augmentation provides the surgeon with advanced visual
      aid for the localization of veins, arteries, and bile ducts to be
      divided or sealed.},
      file = {Feuerstein2007.pdf:Feuerstein2007.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0277786X},
      keywords = {abdominal procedures,calibration,enhanced reality,image-guided therapy,visualization},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      publisher = {Spie},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • E. K. Fishman, B. S. Kuszyk, D. G. Heath, L. Gao, and B. Cabral, “Surgical planning for liver resection,” Computer, vol. 29, iss. 1, pp. 64-72, 1996.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Fishman1996,
      author = {Fishman, E.K. and Kuszyk, B.S. and Heath, D.G. and Luomin Gao and
      Cabral, B.},
      title = {Surgical planning for liver resection},
      journal = {Computer},
      year = {1996},
      volume = {29},
      pages = {64 -72},
      number = {1},
      month = jan,
      abstract = {Surgical resection is the cornerstone of curative therapy for primary
      and metastatic liver tumors. For best results, the surgeon must know
      the location of all hepatic tumor nodules relative to the major vessels
      that define the liver's surgical anatomy. Computed tomography is
      very sensitive for detecting liver tumors, but its planar slices
      do not fully address the three-dimensional nature of this surgical
      problem. We have developed a technique using volume rendering of
      computed tomography data that provides a preoperative 3D map of the
      liver showing tumor location relative to key blood vessels. This
      technique also has important implications for emerging, minimally
      invasive therapies},
      file = {Fishman1996.pdf:Fishman1996.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0018-9162},
      keywords = {computed tomography data;curative therapy;hepatic tumor nodule location;liver
      resection;liver surgical anatomy;major vessels;metastatic liver tumors;minimally
      invasive therapies;preoperative 3D map;primary liver tumors;surgical
      planning;surgical resection;volume rendering;blood;computerised tomography;image
      segmentation;liver;medical image processing;physiology;planning;rendering
      (computer graphics);stereo image processing;surgery;},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2011.01.25}
    }
  • J. S. Fong and H. Ibrahim, “Development of a virtual reality system for Hepatocellular Carcinoma pre-surgical planning,” in Software Technology and Engineering (ICSTE), 2010 2nd International Conference on, 2010, p. V1-41 -V1-45.
    [Bibtex]
    @INPROCEEDINGS{Fong2010,
      author = {Jian Siong Fong and Ibrahim, Haidi},
      title = {Development of a virtual reality system for Hepatocellular Carcinoma
      pre-surgical planning},
      booktitle = {Software Technology and Engineering (ICSTE), 2010 2nd International
      Conference on},
      year = {2010},
      volume = {1},
      pages = {V1-41 -V1-45},
      month = oct.,
      abstract = {Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC) is the most primary liver tumor and
      one of the most common cancers worldwide, particularly in developing
      countries. Various treatment options are available to treat HCC with
      various degrees of success rate and mortality. Studies done by researchers
      have shown that pre-surgical planning tools aid surgeons in planning
      surgery procedures for HCC as well as increasing post-surgery survival
      rate. Previously, pre-surgical planning was done based on medical
      images acquired using medical imaging devices such as Computer Tomography
      (CT), X-Ray, Ultrasound, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Surgeons
      will need to examine the medical images carefully, and picturing
      a 3D liver model using imagination. This process is very time consuming,
      and anatomical variations of tumors might lead to suboptimal treatment
      strategy decision. This project focuses on the application of virtual
      reality technology in HCC pre-surgical planning. One of many deployments
      of virtual reality in pre-surgical planning is to display a virtual
      3D liver model which resembles patient's liver. It is built by taking
      segmented 2D axial slices of patient's liver as input. The operation
      is done by using surface extraction technique. The product of surface
      extraction is a virtual 3D mesh, which is consisted of a group of
      points recorded in their respective three dimensional coordinates.
      These points are mapped to graphic primitives by graphic renderer.
      Interaction control with the 3D model is done by using computer hardware
      interface devices such as mouse, keyboard, joystick or pen input
      devices.},
      file = {:Fong2010.pdf:PDF},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.11.02}
    }
  • B. Frericks, F. Caldarone, B. Nashan, D. Savellano, G. Stamm, T. Kirchhoff, H. Shin, A. Schenk, D. Selle, W. Spindler, J. Klempnauer, H. Peitgen, and M. Galanski, “3D CT modeling of hepatic vessel architecture and volume calculation in living donated liver transplantation,” European Radiology, vol. 14, pp. 326-333, 2004.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Frericks2004,
      author = {Frericks, BerndB. and Caldarone, FrancoC. and Nashan, Björn and Savellano,
      DagmarHögemann and Stamm, Georg and Kirchhoff, TimmD. and Shin, Hoen-Oh
      and Schenk, Andrea and Selle, Dirk and Spindler, Wolf and Klempnauer,
      Jürgen and Peitgen, Heinz-Otto and Galanski, Michael},
      title = {3D CT modeling of hepatic vessel architecture and volume calculation
      in living donated liver transplantation},
      journal = {European Radiology},
      year = {2004},
      volume = {14},
      pages = {326 - 333},
      abstract = {The aim of this study was to evaluate a software tool for non-invasive
      preoperative volumetric assessment of potential donors in living
      donated liver transplantation (LDLT). Biphasic helical CT was performed
      in 56 potential donors. Data sets were post-processed using a non-commercial
      software tool for segmentation, volumetric analysis and visualisation
      of liver segments. Semi-automatic definition of liver margins allowed
      the segmentation of parenchyma. Hepatic vessels were delineated using
      a region-growing algorithm with automatically determined thresholds.
      Volumes and shapes of liver segments were calculated automatically
      based on individual portal-venous branches. Results were visualised
      three-dimensionally and statistically compared with conventional
      volumetry and the intraoperative findings in 27 transplanted cases.
      Image processing was easy to perform within 23 min. Of the 56 potential
      donors, 27 were excluded from LDLT because of inappropriate liver
      parenchyma or vascular architecture. Two recipients were not transplanted
      due to poor clinical conditions. In the 27 transplanted cases, preoperatively
      visualised vessels were confirmed, and only one undetected accessory
      hepatic vein was revealed. Calculated graft volumes were 1110±180 ml
      for right lobes, 820 ml for the left lobe and 270±30 ml for segments
      II+III. The calculated volumes and intraoperatively measured graft
      volumes correlated significantly. No significant differences between
      the presented automatic volumetry and the conventional volumetry
      were observed. A novel image processing technique was evaluated which
      allows a semi-automatic volume calculation and 3D visualisation of
      the different liver segments.},
      affiliation = {Medizinische Hochschule Hannover Diagnostische Radiologie Hannover
      Germany},
      file = {Frericks2004.pdf:Frericks2004.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0938-7994},
      issue = {2},
      keyword = {Medicine},
      keywords = {REV},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      publisher = {Springer Berlin / Heidelberg},
      timestamp = {2011.01.26}
    }
  • G. Glombitza, W. Lamadé, M. a Demiris, M. R. Göpfert, a Mayer, M. L. Bahner, H. P. Meinzer, G. Richter, T. Lehnert, and C. Herfarth, “Virtual planning of liver resections: image processing, visualization and volumetric evaluation.,” International journal of medical informatics, vol. 53, iss. 2-3, pp. 225-37, 1999.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Glombitza1999,
      author = {Glombitza, G and Lamad\'{e}, W and Demiris, a M and G\"{o}pfert,
      M R and Mayer, a and Bahner, M L and Meinzer, H P and Richter, G
      and Lehnert, T and Herfarth, C},
      title = {Virtual planning of liver resections: image processing, visualization
      and volumetric evaluation.},
      journal = {International journal of medical informatics},
      year = {1999},
      volume = {53},
      pages = {225-37},
      number = {2-3},
      abstract = {Operability of a liver tumor depends on its three dimensional relation
      to the intrahepatic vascular trees as well as the volume ratio of
      healthy to tumorous tissue. Precise operation planning is complicated
      by anatomic variability and distortion of the vascular trees by the
      tumor or preceding liver resections. We have developed a computer
      based 3D virtual operation planning system which is ready to go in
      routine use. The main task of a system in this domain is a quantifiable
      patient selection by exact prediction of post-operative liver function.
      It provides the means to measure absolute and relative volumes of
      the organ structures and resected parenchyma. Another important step
      in the pre-operative phase is to visualize the relation between the
      tumor, the liver and the vessel trees for each patient. The new 3D
      operation planning system offers quantifiable liver resection proposals
      based on individualized liver anatomy. The results are presented
      as 3D movies or as interactive visualizations as well as in quantitative
      reports.},
      file = {Glombitza1999.pdf:Glombitza1999.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {1386-5056},
      keywords = {Algorithms,Humans,Image Processing, Computer-Assisted,Liver,Liver
      Neoplasms,Liver Neoplasms: radiography,Liver Neoplasms: surgery,Liver:
      blood supply,Liver: surgery,Therapy, Computer-Assisted,Tomography,
      X-Ray Computed,User-Computer Interface, APP, HES, PLA, VOR},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      pmid = {10193891},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • C. Hansen, A. Kohn, S. Schlichting, F. Weiler, S. Zidowitz, M. Kleemann, and H. Peitgen, “Intraoperative modification of resection plans for liver surgery,” International Journal of Computer Assisted Radiology and Surgery, vol. 3, iss. 3-4, pp. 291-297, 2008.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Hansen2008a,
      author = {Hansen, Christian and Kohn, Alexander and Schlichting, Stefan and
      Weiler, Florian and Zidowitz, Stephan and Kleemann, Markus and Peitgen,
      Heinz-Otto},
      title = {Intraoperative modification of resection plans for liver surgery},
      journal = {International Journal of Computer Assisted Radiology and Surgery},
      year = {2008},
      volume = {3},
      pages = {291-297},
      number = {3-4},
      month = {June},
      abstract = {Objective Recent surgical planning software provides valuable tools
      for evaluating different resection strategies preoperatively.With
      such virtual resections, predictions and quantitative analyses may
      be carried out to assess the resec- tion feasibility with respect
      to tumors and risk structures. In oncologic liver surgery, additional
      tumors that were not seen in the preoperative images are often found
      during the intervention using intraoperative ultrasound (IOUS). Due
      to such findings, the resection strategy must be updated or com-
      pletely revised. Materials and methods Therefore, we have developed
      meth- ods for the intraoperative modification of resection plans.
      The probe of an ultrasound-based navigation system and alternatively
      the pointing device Wiimote are proposed as intraoperative interaction
      devices. Fast adaptation of plan- ning information and the communication
      with both interac- tion devices is supported by our system, the Intraoperative
      Planning Assistant (IPA). The IPA has been evaluated in the operation
      room (OR) during laparoscopic liver interventions on pigs. Results
      Our preliminary results confirm that intraoperative modifications
      of resection plans are both feasible and bene- ficial for liver surgery.
      After the intraoperative modification task, updated remaining liver
      volume and resection volume were displayed and quantified within
      10s. Conclusion For the first time, surgeons are provided with a
      system for intraoperative modification of resection plans that offers
      a crucial decision support, is easy to use and integrates smoothly
      into the clinical workflow. The new system pro- vides major support
      for decision making in the OR and thus improves the safety of surgical
      interventions.},
      file = {Hansen2008a.pdf:Hansen2008a.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {1861-6410},
      keywords = {liver surgery,surgery planning,ultrasound,user interaction,visualization,wiimote,
      APP, HES, GUI, PLA},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • C. Hansen, F. Ritter, J. Wieferich, H. Hahn, and H. -O. Peitgen, “Illustration of Vascular Structures for Augmented Reality in Liver Surgery,” in World Congress on Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, September 7 – 12, 2009, Munich, Germany, R. Magjarevic, O. Dössel, and W. C. Schlegel, Eds., Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2010, vol. 25 / 4, pp. 2113-2116.
    [Bibtex]
    @INCOLLECTION{Hansen2010c,
      author = {Hansen, C. and Ritter, F. and Wieferich, J. and Hahn, H. and Peitgen,
      H. -O.},
      title = {Illustration of Vascular Structures for Augmented Reality in Liver
      Surgery},
      booktitle = {World Congress on Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, September
      7 - 12, 2009, Munich, Germany},
      publisher = {Springer Berlin Heidelberg},
      year = {2010},
      editor = {Magjarevic, Ratko and Dössel, Olaf and Schlegel, Wolfgang C.},
      volume = {25 / 4},
      series = {IFMBE Proceedings},
      pages = {2113 - 2116},
      abstract = {We present methods for intraoperative visualization of vascular structures
      in liver surgery. The underlying concept combines conventional augmented
      reality approaches with illustrative rendering techniques. Our methods
      reduce the visual complexity of vascular structures, and accentuate
      spatial relations. The proposed visualization techniques are embedded
      in a clinical prototype application that has already been used in
      the operating room for preliminary evaluations. To verify the expressiveness
      of our illustration methods, we performed a user study with controlled
      lab conditions. The study revealed a clear advantage in distance
      assessment for the proposed illustrative approach in comparison to
      conventional rendering techniques.},
      affiliation = {Institute for Medical Image Computing, Fraunhofer MEVIS, Bremen, Germany},
      file = {Hansen2010c.pdf:Hansen2010c.pdf:PDF},
      isbn = {978-3-642-03882-2},
      keyword = {Engineering},
      keywords = {TEC, HES},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2011.01.26}
    }
  • C. Hansen, S. Schlichting, S. Zidowitz, A. K, M. Hindennach, M. Kleemann, and H. Peitgen, “Intraoperative Adaptation and Visualization of Preoperative Risk Analyses for Oncologic Liver Surgery,” Methods, 2008.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Hansen2008b,
      author = {Hansen, Christian and Schlichting, Stefan and Zidowitz, Stephan and
      K, Alexander and Hindennach, Milo and Kleemann, Markus and Peitgen,
      Heinz-otto},
      title = {Intraoperative Adaptation and Visualization of Preoperative Risk
      Analyses for Oncologic Liver Surgery},
      journal = {Methods},
      year = {2008},
      file = {Hansen2008b.pdf:Hansen2008b.pdf:PDF},
      keywords = {intraoperative imaging,treatment planning,ultrasound guidance,visualization,
      APP, HES, GUI, SUR},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • C. Hansen, J. Wieferich, F. Ritter, C. Rieder, and H. Peitgen, “Illustrative visualization of 3D planning models for augmented reality in liver surgery.,” International journal of computer assisted radiology and surgery, vol. 5, iss. 2, pp. 133-41, 2010.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Hansen2010a,
      author = {Hansen, Christian and Wieferich, Jan and Ritter, Felix and Rieder,
      Christian and Peitgen, Heinz-Otto},
      title = {Illustrative visualization of 3D planning models for augmented reality
      in liver surgery.},
      journal = {International journal of computer assisted radiology and surgery},
      year = {2010},
      volume = {5},
      pages = {133-41},
      number = {2},
      month = {March},
      abstract = {PURPOSE: Augmented reality (AR) obtains increasing acceptance in the
      operating room. However, a meaningful augmentation of the surgical
      view with a 3D visualization of planning data which allows reliable
      comparisons of distances and spatial relations is still an open request.
      METHODS: We introduce methods for intraoperative visualization of
      3D planning models which extend illustrative rendering and AR techniques.
      We aim to reduce visual complexity of 3D planning models and accentuate
      spatial relations between relevant objects. The main contribution
      of our work is an advanced silhouette algorithm for 3D planning models
      (distance-encoding silhouettes) combined with procedural textures
      (distance-encoding surfaces). In addition, we present a method for
      illustrative visualization of resection surfaces. RESULTS: The developed
      algorithms have been embedded into a clinical prototype that has
      been evaluated in the operating room. To verify the expressiveness
      of our illustration methods, we performed a user study under controlled
      conditions. The study revealed a clear advantage in distance assessment
      with the proposed illustrative approach in comparison to classical
      rendering techniques. CONCLUSION: The presented illustration methods
      are beneficial for distance assessment in surgical AR. To increase
      the safety of interventions with the proposed approach, the reduction
      of inaccuracies in tracking and registration is a subject of our
      current research.},
      file = {Hansen2010a.pdf:Hansen2010a.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {1861-6429},
      keywords = {Humans,Imaging, Three-Dimensional,Intraoperative Period,Liver Diseases,Liver
      Diseases: surgery,Software,Space Perception,Surgery, Computer-Assisted,Surgery,
      Computer-Assisted: methods,Surgery, Computer-Assisted: standards,
      TRM, AUR, APP, HES, SUR},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      pmid = {20033519},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • C. Hansen, S. Zidowitz, A. Schenk, K. -J. Oldhafer, H. Lang, and H. -O. Peitgen, “Risk maps for navigation in liver surgery,” Imaging, vol. 7625, p. 762528–762528–8, 2010.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Hansen2010b,
      author = {Hansen, C. and Zidowitz, S. and Schenk, A. and Oldhafer, K.-J. and
      Lang, H. and Peitgen, H.-O.},
      title = {Risk maps for navigation in liver surgery},
      journal = {Imaging},
      year = {2010},
      volume = {7625},
      pages = {762528--762528--8},
      abstract = {The optimal transfer of preoperative planning data and risk evaluations
      to the operative site is challenging. A common practice is to use
      preoperative 3D planning models as a printout or as a presentation
      on a display. One important aspect is that these models were not
      developed to provide information in complex workspaces like the operating
      room. Our aim is to reduce the visual complexity of 3D planning models
      by mapping surgically relevant information onto a risk map. Therefore,
      we present methods for the identification and classification of critical
      anatomical structures in the proximity of a preoperatively planned
      resection surface. Shadow-like distance indicators are introduced
      to encode the distance from the resection surface to these critical
      structures on the risk map. In addition, contour lines are used to
      accentuate shape and spatial depth. The resulting visualization is
      clear and intuitive, allowing for a fast mental mapping of the current
      resection surface to the risk map. Preliminary evaluations by liver
      surgeons indicate that damage to risk structures may be prevented
      and patient safety may be enhanced using the proposed methods.},
      file = {Hansen2010b.pdf:Hansen2010b.pdf:PDF},
      keywords = {computer-assisted interventions,image-guided surgery,intraoperative
      visualization,surgical navigation, APP, HES, PLA, SUR},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • J. Harms, M. Bartels, H. Bourquain, H. O. Peitgen, T. Schulz, T. Kahn, J. Hauss, and J. Fangmann, “Computerized CT-Based 3D Visualization Technique in Living Related Liver Transplantation,” Transplantation Proceedings, vol. 37, iss. 2, pp. 1059-1062, 2005.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Harms2005,
      author = {J. Harms and M. Bartels and H. Bourquain and H.O. Peitgen and T.
      Schulz and T. Kahn and J. Hauss and J. Fangmann},
      title = {Computerized CT-Based 3D Visualization Technique in Living Related
      Liver Transplantation},
      journal = {Transplantation Proceedings},
      year = {2005},
      volume = {37},
      pages = {1059 - 1062},
      number = {2},
      abstract = {Introduction For living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) accurate
      diagnostic workup is essential. Multiple imaging approaches are currently
      used. Problems arise in the assessment of vascular and bile duct
      anatomy, liver graft volume, and vascular territories involved. A
      3D visualization system that improves anatomic assessment, allows
      interactive surgery planning, and acts as an intraoperative guide
      with enhanced precision is required. Refinements in computed tomography
      (CT) technology with the introduction of multidetector-row CT scanners
      and implementation of mathematical methods on computerized digital
      data has enabled CT-based 3D visualizations.Materials and Methods
      Sixteen LDLT candidates and three LDLT recipients were assessed by
      multislice CT examination. Image processing of the digital raw data
      for 3D visualization included segmentation and calculation of center
      lines. A hierarchical mathematical model representing the vascular
      and biliary tree was created. This allowed calculation of individual
      vascular territories.Results 3D CT-based visualization in LDLT facilitates
      diagnostic workup with high accuracy for analyses of vascular and
      bile duct variants, volumetry, and assessement of the optimal surgical
      splitting line of the living donor liver. Resultant areas of either
      arterial devascularization or venous congestion can be displayed
      and quantified preoperatively. The diagnostic method is of major
      impact on patient selection and directly influences intraoperative
      surgical guidance. The currently practiced #multiple##imaging##approach#
      approach, especially with regard to invasive diagnostics, can be
      avoided in the future.},
      file = {Harms2005.pdf:Harms2005.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0041-1345},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2011.01.25}
    }
  • O. Konrad-Verse, B. Preim, and A. Littmann, “Virtual resection with a deformable cutting plane,” , vol. 2004, pp. 203-214, 2004.
    [Bibtex]
    @CONFERENCE{Konrad2004,
      author = {Konrad-Verse, O. and Preim, B. and Littmann, A.},
      title = {Virtual resection with a deformable cutting plane},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of simulation und visualisierung},
      year = {2004},
      volume = {2004},
      pages = {203 - 214},
      organization = {Citeseer},
      file = {Konrad2004.pdf:Konrad2004.pdf:PDF},
      keywords = {TEC},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.11.18}
    }
  • W. Lamade, G. Glombitza, L. Fischer, P. Chiu, C. E. Cárdenas, M. Thorn, H. P. Meinzer, L. Grenacher, H. Bauer, T. Lehnert, and C. Herfarth, “The impact of 3-dimensional reconstructions on operation planning in liver surgery.,” Archives of surgery (Chicago, Ill. : 1960), vol. 135, iss. 11, pp. 1256-61, 2000.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Lamade2000,
      author = {Lamade, W and Glombitza, G and Fischer, L and Chiu, P and C\'{a}rdenas,
      C E and Thorn, M and Meinzer, H P and Grenacher, L and Bauer, H and
      Lehnert, T and Herfarth, C},
      title = {The impact of 3-dimensional reconstructions on operation planning
      in liver surgery.},
      journal = {Archives of surgery (Chicago, Ill. : 1960)},
      year = {2000},
      volume = {135},
      pages = {1256 - 61},
      number = {11},
      month = {November},
      abstract = {BACKGROUND: Operation planning in liver surgery depends on the precise
      understanding of the 3-dimensional (D) relation of the tumor to the
      intrahepatic vascular trees. To our knowledge, the impact of anatomical
      3-D reconstructions on precision in operation planning has not yet
      been studied. HYPOTHESIS: Three-dimensional reconstruction leads
      to an improvement of the ability to localize the tumor and an increased
      precision in operation planning in liver surgery. DESIGN: We developed
      a new interactive computer-based quantitative 3-D operation planning
      system for liver surgery, which is being introduced to the clinical
      routine. To evaluate whether 3-D reconstruction leads to improved
      operation planning, we conducted a clinical trial. The data sets
      of 7 virtual patients were presented to a total of 81 surgeons in
      different levels of training. The tumors had to be assigned to a
      liver segment and subsequently drawn together with the operation
      proposal into a given liver model. The precision of the assignment
      to a liver segment according to Couinaud classification and the operation
      proposal were measured quantitatively for each surgeon and stratified
      concerning 2-D and different types of 3-D presentations. RESULTS:
      The ability of correct tumor assignment to a liver segment was significantly
      correlated to the level of training (P<.05). Compared with 2-D computed
      tomography scans, 3-D reconstruction leads to a significant increase
      of precision in tumor localization by 37\%. The target area of the
      resection proposal was improved by up to 31\%. CONCLUSION: Three-dimensional
      reconstruction leads to a significant improvement of tumor localization
      ability and to an increased precision of operation planning in liver
      surgery.},
      issn = {0004-0010},
      keywords = {Computer Simulation,General Surgery,General Surgery: education,Hepatectomy,Hepatectomy:
      methods,Humans,Image Processing, Computer-Assisted,Liver,Liver Neoplasms,Liver
      Neoplasms: surgery,Liver: blood supply,Liver: pathology,Therapy,
      Computer-Assisted,Tomography, X-Ray Computed,User-Computer Interface},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      pmid = {11074877},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • T. Lange, S. Eulenstein, M. Hünerbein, H. Lamecker, and P. M. Schlag, “Augmenting intraoperative 3D ultrasound with preoperative models for navigation in liver surgery,” Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention–MICCAI 2004, pp. 534-541, 2004.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Lange2004,
      author = {Lange, T. and Eulenstein, S. and H{\\"u}nerbein, M. and Lamecker,
      H. and Schlag, P.M.},
      title = {Augmenting intraoperative 3D ultrasound with preoperative models
      for navigation in liver surgery},
      journal = {Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention--MICCAI
      2004},
      year = {2004},
      pages = {534 - 541},
      file = {Lange2004.pdf:Lange2004.pdf:PDF},
      owner = {Thomas},
      publisher = {Springer},
      timestamp = {2011.01.31}
    }
  • B. N. Li, P. B. Nguyen, S. H. Ong, J. Qin, L. Yang, and C. K. Chui, “Image Processing and Modeling for Active Needle Steering in Liver Surgery,” in Informatics in Control, Automation and Robotics, 2009. CAR ’09. International Asia Conference on, 2009, pp. 306-310.
    [Bibtex]
    @INPROCEEDINGS{Li2009,
      author = {Bing Nan Li and Phu Binh Nguyen and Ong, S.H. and Jing Qin and Liang
      Jing Yang and Chui, C.K.},
      title = {Image Processing and Modeling for Active Needle Steering in Liver
      Surgery},
      booktitle = {Informatics in Control, Automation and Robotics, 2009. CAR '09. International
      Asia Conference on},
      year = {2009},
      pages = {306 -310},
      month = {February},
      abstract = {Image-guided intervention and needle steering for radiofrequency ablation
      (RFA) of the liver is reviewed in this paper. In particular, the
      concept of active needle is proposed for RFA treatment. Methods and
      techniques of image processing and modeling are presented for a stereo
      liver model. The liver model and constituent components extracted
      from computerized tomography (CT) images can be used to plan the
      navigation paths of the RFA needle. The system also provides an option
      for active needles, which are more amenable to those refractory cases
      of RFA treatment.},
      file = {:Li2009.pdf:PDF},
      keywords = {RFA needle navigation path;active needle steering;computerized tomography;image
      modeling;image processing;radiofrequency ablation treatment;stereo
      liver surgery;biomedical equipment;computerised tomography;liver;medical
      image processing;needles;radiofrequency heating;stereo image processing;surgery;,
      TEC, IMP},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.11.02}
    }
  • H. Meinzer, “Computerized planning of liver surgery an overview,” Computers & Graphics, vol. 26, iss. 4, pp. 569-576, 2002.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Meinzer2002,
      author = {Meinzer, H},
      title = {Computerized planning of liver surgery an overview},
      journal = {Computers \& Graphics},
      year = {2002},
      volume = {26},
      pages = {569-576},
      number = {4},
      month = {August},
      abstract = {Liver surgery is a field in which computer-based operation planning
      has an enormous impact on the selection of therapeutic strategy.
      Based on pre-operative analysis of image data, liver operation planning
      provides a individual impression of tumor location, the exact structure
      of the vascular system and an identification of liver segments and
      sub- segments. In this paper we present an operation planning system
      that is based on an object-oriented framework. This framework offers
      extensive automation of the integration process for software modules
      developed for medical software systems. The operation planning system
      can calculate the operation proposal results using two different
      approaches. The first method is based on the Couinaud’s classification
      system, which uses the main stems of the portal and venous trees.
      The second approach is a portal vein based method. These two approaches
      were compared using 23 liver CT scans. The volumetric data for individual
      segments demonstrates differences between the two segment classification
      methods. r 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.},
      file = {Meinzer2002.pdf:Meinzer2002.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {00978493},
      keywords = {computer tomography,computer-based surgery,liver resection,operation
      planning, HES, PLA, REV},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • L. Mundeleer, D. Wikler, T. Leloup, and N. Warzee, “Development of a computer assisted system aimed at RFA liver surgery.,” Computerized medical imaging and graphics : the official journal of the Computerized Medical Imaging Society, vol. 32, iss. 7, pp. 611-21, 2008.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Mundeleer2008,
      author = {Mundeleer, Laurent and Wikler, David and Leloup, Thierry and Warzee,
      Nadine},
      title = {Development of a computer assisted system aimed at RFA liver surgery.},
      journal = {Computerized medical imaging and graphics : the official journal
      of the Computerized Medical Imaging Society},
      year = {2008},
      volume = {32},
      pages = {611-21},
      number = {7},
      month = {October},
      abstract = {Radio frequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive treatment for
      either hepatocellular carcinoma or metastasis liver carcinoma. In
      order to resect large lesions, the surgeon has to perform multiple
      time-consuming destruction cycles and reposition the RFA needle for
      each of them. The critical step in handling a successful ablation
      and preventing local recurrence is the correct positioning of the
      needle. For small tumors, the surgeon places the middle of the active
      needle tip in the center of the tumor under intra-operative ultrasound
      guidance. When one application is not enough to cover the entire
      tumor, the surgeon needs to repeat the treatment after repositioning
      of the needle, but US guidance is obstructed by the opacity stemming
      from the first RFA application. In this case the surgeon can only
      rely on anatomical knowledge and the repositioning of the RFA needle
      becomes a subjective task limiting the treatment accuracy. We have
      developed a computer assisted surgery guidance application for this
      repositioning procedure. Our software application handles the complete
      process from preoperative image analysis to tool tracking in the
      operating room. Our framework is mostly used for this RFA procedure,
      but is also suitable for any other medical or surgery application.},
      file = {Mundeleer2008.pdf:Mundeleer2008.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0895-6111},
      keywords = {Algorithms,Artificial Intelligence,Catheter Ablation,Catheter Ablation:
      instrumentation,Catheter Ablation: methods,Hepatectomy,Hepatectomy:
      instrumentation,Hepatectomy: methods,Humans,Pattern Recognition,
      Automated,Pattern Recognition, Automated: methods,Surgery, Computer-Assisted,Surgery,
      Computer-Assisted: instrumentation,Surgery, Computer-Assisted: methods,Systems
      Integration,Ultrasonography, Interventional,Ultrasonography, Interventional:
      instrumentation,Ultrasonography, Interventional: methods, TEC},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      pmid = {18723321},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • S. Nicolau, X. Pennec, L. Soler, and N. Ayache, “A complete augmented reality guidance system for liver punctures: First clinical evaluation,” Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention – MICCAI 2005, pp. 539-547, 2005.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Nicolau2005,
      author = {Nicolau, SA and Pennec, X. and Soler, L. and Ayache, N.},
      title = {A complete augmented reality guidance system for liver punctures:
      First clinical evaluation},
      journal = {Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention - MICCAI
      2005},
      year = {2005},
      pages = {539 - 547},
      file = {Nicolau2005.pdf:Nicolau2005.pdf:PDF},
      owner = {Thomas},
      publisher = {Springer},
      timestamp = {2011.01.31}
    }
  • S. A. Nicolau, X. Pennec, L. Soler, X. Buy, A. Gangi, N. Ayache, and J. Marescaux, “An augmented reality system for liver thermal ablation: Design and evaluation on clinical cases,” Medical Image Analysis, vol. 13, iss. 3, pp. 494-506, 2009.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Nicolau2009,
      author = {S.A. Nicolau and X. Pennec and L. Soler and X. Buy and A. Gangi and
      N. Ayache and J. Marescaux},
      title = {An augmented reality system for liver thermal ablation: Design and
      evaluation on clinical cases},
      journal = {Medical Image Analysis},
      year = {2009},
      volume = {13},
      pages = {494 - 506},
      number = {3},
      abstract = {We present in this paper an augmented reality guidance system for
      liver thermal ablation in interventional radiology. To show the relevance
      of our methodology, the system is incrementally evaluated on an abdominal
      phantom and then on patients in the operating room. The system registers
      in a common coordinate system a preoperative image of the patient
      and the position of the needle that the practitioner manipulates.
      The breathing motion uncertainty is taken into account with a respiratory
      gating technique: the preoperative image and the guidance step are
      synchronized on expiratory phases. In order to fulfil the real-time
      constraints, we have developed and validated algorithms that automatically
      process and extract feature points. Since the guidance interface
      is also a major component of the system effectiveness, we validate
      the overall targeting accuracy on an abdominal phantom. This experiment
      showed that a practitioner can reach a predefined target with an
      accuracy of 2 mm with an insertion time below one minute. Finally,
      we propose a passive evaluation protocol of the overall system in
      the operating room during five interventions on patients. These experiments
      show that the system can provide a guidance information during expiratory
      phases with an error below 5 mm.},
      file = {Nicolau2009.pdf:Nicolau2009.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {1361-8415},
      keywords = {Augmented reality, APP, AUR, HES},
      owner = {Thomas},
      timestamp = {2011.01.31}
    }
  • K. Numminen, O. Sipila, and H. Makisalo, “Preoperative hepatic 3D models: virtual liver resection using three-dimensional imaging technique.,” European journal of radiology, vol. 56, iss. 2, pp. 179-84, 2005.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Numminen2005,
      author = {Numminen, Kirsti and Sipila, Outi and Makisalo, Heikki},
      title = {Preoperative hepatic 3D models: virtual liver resection using three-dimensional
      imaging technique.},
      journal = {European journal of radiology},
      year = {2005},
      volume = {56},
      pages = {179-84},
      number = {2},
      month = {November},
      abstract = {Emerging new techniques for liver resections set new requirements
      for the preoperative imaging and planning. Open surgery is a three-dimensional
      procedure and planning of the resection line may be difficult when
      basing on conventional two-dimensional CTs or MRIs, although all
      the information is there. With multidetector-row CT (MDCT), thin
      slices can be obtained with excellent temporal resolution, and precise
      three-dimensional (3D) models can be created. We regard 3D imaging
      technique useful in most liver resections. It improves the surgeon's
      knowledge of liver anatomy and makes even more complicated liver
      resections safe. Better knowledge of three-dimensional appearances
      of liver structures may further improve the results of curative liver
      surgery. However, before becoming a routine clinical procedure, research
      and development are still needed. Also, careful testing and evaluation
      of the methods have to be performed. In the future, 3D models will
      probably play an important role in the preoperative planning of liver
      resections.},
      file = {Numminen2005.pdf:Numminen2005.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0720-048X},
      keywords = {Computer Simulation,Hepatectomy,Hepatectomy: methods,Humans,Image
      Processing, Computer-Assisted,Image Processing, Computer-Assisted:
      methods,Imaging, Three-Dimensional,Imaging, Three-Dimensional: methods,Liver,Liver
      Neoplasms,Liver Neoplasms: pathology,Liver Neoplasms: radiography,Liver
      Neoplasms: surgery,Liver: pathology,Liver: radiography,Liver: surgery,Patient
      Care Planning,Preoperative Care,Tomography, X-Ray Computed,Tomography,
      X-Ray Computed: methods,User-Computer Interface, TEC},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      pmid = {15890482},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • B. Reitinger, A. Bornik, R. Beichel, and D. Schmalstieg, “Liver Surgery Planning Using Virtual Reality,” Liver, iss. December, pp. 36-47, 2006.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Reitinger2006,
      author = {Reitinger, Bernhard and Bornik, Alexander and Beichel, Reinhard and
      Schmalstieg, Dieter},
      title = {Liver Surgery Planning Using Virtual Reality},
      journal = {Liver},
      year = {2006},
      pages = {36 - 47},
      number = {December},
      file = {Reitinger2006.pdf:Reitinger2006.pdf:PDF},
      keywords = {APP, PLA, HES, SUR, AUR, STV},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.10.25}
    }
  • F. Ritter, C. Hansen, V. Dicken, O. Konrad, B. Preim, and H. O. Peitgen, “Real-time illustration of vascular structures,” IEEE transactions on visualization and computer graphics, pp. 877-884, 2006.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Ritter2006,
      author = {Ritter, F. and Hansen, C. and Dicken, V. and Konrad, O. and Preim,
      B. and Peitgen, H.O.},
      title = {Real-time illustration of vascular structures},
      journal = {IEEE transactions on visualization and computer graphics},
      year = {2006},
      pages = {877 - 884},
      file = {Ritter2006.pdf:Ritter2006.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {1077-2626},
      keywords = {TEC},
      owner = {Thomas},
      publisher = {Published by the IEEE Computer Society},
      timestamp = {2011.01.31}
    }
  • F. Ritter, M. Hindennach, W. Lamadé, K. Oldhafer, and H. Peitgen, “Intraoperative Adaptation of Preoperative Risk Analysis in Oncological Liver Surgery,” Proceedings of CURAC (Berlin), September 2005.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Ritter2005,
      author = {Ritter, F. and Hindennach, M. and Lamad{\'e}, W. and Oldhafer, K.
      and Peitgen, HO},
      title = {Intraoperative Adaptation of Preoperative Risk Analysis in Oncological
      Liver Surgery},
      journal = {Proceedings of CURAC (Berlin), September 2005},
      file = {Ritter2005.pdf:Ritter2005.pdf:PDF},
      owner = {Thomas},
      timestamp = {2011.01.31}
    }
  • M. Scheuering, “Intraoperative augmented reality for minimally invasive liver interventions,” Proceedings of SPIE, pp. 407-417, 2003.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Scheuering2003,
      author = {Scheuering, Michael},
      title = {Intraoperative augmented reality for minimally invasive liver interventions},
      journal = {Proceedings of SPIE},
      year = {2003},
      pages = {407 - 417},
      abstract = {Minimally invasive liver interventions demand a lot of experience
      due to the limited access to the field of operation.
      
      In particular, the correct placement of the trocar and the navigation
      within the patient’s body are hampered. In
      
      this work, we present an intraoperative augmented reality system (IARS)
      that directly projects preoperatively
      
      planned information and structures extracted from CT data, onto the
      real laparoscopic video images. Our system
      
      consists of a preoperative planning tool for liver surgery and an
      intraoperative real time visualization component.
      
      The planning software takes into account the individual anatomy of
      the intrahepatic vessels and determines the
      
      vascular territories. Methods for fast segmentation of the liver parenchyma,
      of the intrahepatic vessels and of
      
      liver lesions are provided. In addition, very efficient algorithms for
      skeletonization and vascular analysis allowing
      
      the approximation of patient-individual liver vascular territories
      are included. The intraoperative visualization is
      
      based on a standard graphics adapter for hardware accelerated high
      performance direct volume rendering. The
      
      preoperative CT data is rigidly registered to the patient position
      by the use of fiducials that are attached to
      
      the patient’s body, and anatomical landmarks in combination with an
      electro-magnetic navigation system. Our
      
      system was evaluated in vivo during a minimally invasive intervention
      simulation in a swine under anesthesia.},
      file = {Scheuering2003.pdf:Scheuering2003.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0277786X},
      keywords = {computer as-,direct volume rendering,hardware acceleration,image-guided
      surgery,registration, AUR, HES},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      publisher = {Spie},
      timestamp = {2010.10.25}
    }
  • J. Schwaiger, M. Markert, B. Seidl, N. Shevchenko, N. Doerfler, and T. C. Lueth, “Risk analysis for intraoperative liver surgery,” , pp. 410-413, 2010.
    [Bibtex]
    @CONFERENCE{Schwaiger2010,
      author = {Schwaiger, J. and Markert, M. and Seidl, B. and Shevchenko, N. and
      Doerfler, N. and Lueth, T.C.},
      title = {Risk analysis for intraoperative liver surgery},
      booktitle = {Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC), 2010 Annual International
      Conference of the IEEE},
      year = {2010},
      pages = {410 - 413},
      organization = {IEEE},
      file = {Schwaiger2010.pdf:Schwaiger2010.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {1557-170X},
      keywords = {IMP},
      owner = {Thomas},
      timestamp = {2011.01.31}
    }
  • D. Selle, B. Preim, A. Schenk, and H. Peitgen, “Analysis of vasculature for liver surgical planning.,” IEEE transactions on medical imaging, vol. 21, iss. 11, pp. 1344-57, 2002.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Selle2002,
      author = {Selle, Dirk and Preim, Bernhard and Schenk, Andrea and Peitgen, Heinz-Otto},
      title = {Analysis of vasculature for liver surgical planning.},
      journal = {IEEE transactions on medical imaging},
      year = {2002},
      volume = {21},
      pages = {1344 - 57},
      number = {11},
      month = {November},
      abstract = {For liver surgical planning, the structure and morphology of the hepatic
      vessels and their relationship to tumors are of major interest. To
      achieve a fast and robust assistance with optimal quantitative and
      visual information, we present methods for a geometrical and structural
      analysis of vessel systems. Starting from the raw image data a sequence
      of image processing steps has to be carried out until a three-dimensional
      representation of the relevant anatomic and pathologic structures
      is generated. Based on computed tomography (CT) scans, the following
      steps are performed. 1) The volume data is preprocessed and the vessels
      are segmented. 2) The skeleton of the vessels is determined and transformed
      into a graph enabling a geometrical and structural shape analysis.
      Using this information the different intrahepatic vessel systems
      are identified automatically. 3) Based on the structural analysis
      of the branches of the portal vein, their vascular territories are
      approximated with different methods. These methods are compared and
      validated anatomically by means of corrosion casts of human livers.
      4) Vessels are visualized with graphics primitives fitted to the
      skeleton to provide smooth visualizations without aliasing artifacts.
      The image analysis techniques have been evaluated in the clinical
      environment and have been used in more than 170 cases so far to plan
      interventions and transplantations.},
      file = {Selle2002.pdf:Selle2002.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0278-0062},
      keywords = {Algorithms,Angiography,Angiography: methods,Bile Ducts, Intrahepatic,Bile
      Ducts, Intrahepatic: radiography,Cadaver,Hepatic Artery,Hepatic Artery:
      radiography,Hepatic Veins,Hepatic Veins: radiography,Humans,Imaging,
      Three-Dimensional,Imaging, Three-Dimensional: instrumentation,Imaging,
      Three-Dimensional: methods,Liver,Liver Neoplasms,Liver Neoplasms:
      radiography,Liver Neoplasms: surgery,Liver Transplantation,Liver
      Transplantation: methods,Liver Transplantation: radiography,Liver:
      blood supply,Liver: radiography,Liver: surgery,Pattern Recognition,
      Automated,Phantoms, Imaging,Portal Vein,Portal Vein: radiography,Preoperative
      Care,Preoperative Care: methods,Radiographic Image Enhancement,Radiographic
      Image Enhancement: instrumentation,Radiographic Image Enhancement:
      methods,Radiographic Image Interpretation, Computer-Assist,Surgery,
      Computer-Assisted,Surgery, Computer-Assisted: methods,Tomography,
      X-Ray Computed,Tomography, X-Ray Computed: instrumentation,Tomography,
      X-Ray Computed: methods,User-Computer Interface, TEC, HES, SUR, VOR},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      pmid = {12575871},
      timestamp = {2010.10.25}
    }
  • N. Shevchenko, B. Seidl, J. Schwaiger, M. Markert, and T. C. Lueth, “MiMed liver: A planning system for liver surgery,” in Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC), 2010 Annual International Conference of the IEEE, 2010, pp. 1882-1885.
    [Bibtex]
    @INPROCEEDINGS{Shevchenko2010,
      author = {Shevchenko, N. and Seidl, B. and Schwaiger, J. and Markert, M. and
      Lueth, T.C.},
      title = {MiMed liver: A planning system for liver surgery},
      booktitle = {Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC), 2010 Annual International
      Conference of the IEEE},
      year = {2010},
      pages = {1882 - 1885},
      abstract = {In clinical routine of liver surgery there are a multitude of risks
      such as vessel injuries, blood loss, incomplete tumor resection,
      etc. In order to avoid these risks the surgeons perform a planning
      of a surgical intervention. A good graphical representation of the
      liver and its inner structures is of great importance for a good
      planning. In this work we introduce a new planning system for liver
      surgery, which is meant for computer tomography (CT) data analysis
      and graphical representation. The system is based on automatic and
      semiautomatic segmentation techniques as well as on a simple and
      intuitive user interface and was developed with the intention to
      help surgeons by planning an operation and increasing the efficiency
      in open liver surgery.},
      file = {Shevchenko2010.pdf:Shevchenko2010.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {1557-170X},
      keywords = {MiMed Liver planning sytem;computer tomography;data analysis;graphical
      representation;image segmentation;liver surgery;tumors;user interface;vascular
      tree;cancer;computer graphics;computerised tomography;data analysis;image
      representation;image segmentation;liver;medical image processing;surgery;tumours;user
      interfaces;, TEC, HES},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2011.01.26}
    }
  • V. Sojar, D. Stanisavljevic, M. Hribernik, M. Glusic, D. Kreuh, U. Velkavrh, and T. Fius, “Liver surgery training and planning in 3D virtual space,” International Congress Series, vol. 1268, pp. 390-394, 2004.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Sojar2004,
      author = {V. Sojar and D. Stanisavljevic and M. Hribernik and M. Glusic and
      D. Kreuh and U. Velkavrh and T. Fius},
      title = {Liver surgery training and planning in 3D virtual space},
      journal = {International Congress Series},
      year = {2004},
      volume = {1268},
      pages = {390 - 394},
      abstract = {Liver surgery is still one of the most demanding fields in surgery,
      and planning a liver resection always presents a challenge for a
      surgeon. Many authors have already described three-dimensional (3D)
      reconstructions of conventional computer tomography (CT) and nuclear
      magnetic resonance (NMR) scans, which enable precise surgery planning.
      But while the reconstruction can be seen, the user cannot simulate
      surgery. The ultimate goal has been to produce 3D reconstructions
      of the conventional CT or NMR slices and thus virtual environment
      that allows planning and simulation of the surgical procedure. The
      project of developing a computer program for planning and simulating
      liver surgery had three steps: The first step was creating a 3D virtual
      liver and virtual environment. The second step was developing the
      method to reconstruct the liver from conventional CT scans. The final
      step was transferring the data obtained to the previously created
      virtual environment for manipulation. The result of this process
      is a liver surgery educational tool, which produces a virtual environment
      using PC based software. It provides the opportunity to manipulate
      a 3D liver and it is tool for studying the internal liver structures
      for all four vessels systems. The virtual environment portrays a
      detailed liver segmentation. The program's most important function
      is allowing the opportunity to perform virtual intraoperative ultra
      sound on a virtual liver. The virtual liver can be dissected; the
      vessels can be clipped, ligated and cut. The program for 3D reconstruction
      from conventional CT scans has been developed so that the obtained
      data may be used for simulated surgery in the virtual environment.
      The virtual liver of the real patient has the capacity to be manipulated,
      cut, dissected; moreover, the intraoperative ultra sound can be performed
      as in the real surgery. First simulations have shown clear benefits
      in planning liver surgery. The rapid development of computer technology
      offers many possibilities in education and surgery planning. The
      group successfully developed the PC based application for surgery
      planning and simulation in virtual environment as well as for educational
      purposes.},
      file = {Sojar2004.pdf:Sojar2004.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0531-5131},
      keywords = {Liver surgery planning, TEC},
      owner = {Thomas},
      timestamp = {2011.01.31}
    }
  • L. Soler, H. Delingette, G. Malandain, N. Ayache, C. Koehl, J. Clement, O. Dourthe, and J. Marescaux, “An automatic virtual patient reconstruction from CT-scans for hepatic surgical planning,” Medicine meets virtual reality 2000: envisioning healing: interactive technology and the patient-practitioner dialogue, p. 316, 2000.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Soler2000,
      author = {Soler, L. and Delingette, H. and Malandain, G. and Ayache, N. and
      Koehl, C. and Clement, JM and Dourthe, O. and Marescaux, J.},
      title = {An automatic virtual patient reconstruction from CT-scans for hepatic
      surgical planning},
      journal = {Medicine meets virtual reality 2000: envisioning healing: interactive
      technology and the patient-practitioner dialogue},
      year = {2000},
      pages = {316},
      file = {Soler2000.pdf:Soler2000.pdf:PDF},
      isbn = {1586030140},
      keywords = {APP, PLA, PLA, HES, SUR, VOR},
      owner = {Thomas},
      publisher = {Ios Pr Inc},
      timestamp = {2011.01.31}
    }
  • E. Sorantin, G. Werkgartner, R. Beichel, A. Bornik, B. Reitinger, N. Popovic, and M. Sonka, “Virtual Liver Surgery Planning,” in Image Processing in Radiology, E. Neri, D. Caramella, and C. Bartolozzi, Eds., Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2008, pp. 411-418.
    [Bibtex]
    @INCOLLECTION{Sorantin2008,
      author = {Sorantin, Erich and Werkgartner, Georg and Beichel, Reinhard and
      Bornik, Alexander and Reitinger, Bernhard and Popovic, Nikolaus and
      Sonka, Milan},
      title = {Virtual Liver Surgery Planning},
      booktitle = {Image Processing in Radiology},
      publisher = {Springer Berlin Heidelberg},
      year = {2008},
      editor = {Neri, Emanuele and Caramella, Davide and Bartolozzi, Carlo},
      series = {Medical Radiology},
      pages = {411 - 418},
      abstract = {Liver tumors account for a considerable number of deaths every year
      (World Health Organization, 2004). One of type of primary liver tumors
      is hepatocellular carcinoma, which arises frequently as a complication
      of liver cirrhosis. Additionally, almost any tumor can seed metastasis
      within the liver, colorectal cancer being at the top of the list.},
      affiliation = {Medical University Graz Department of Radiology Auenbruggerplatz 9
      8036 Graz Austria},
      file = {Sorantin2008.pdf:Sorantin2008.pdf:PDF},
      isbn = {978-3-540-49830-8},
      keyword = {Medicine &amp; Public Health},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2011.01.26}
    }
  • M. Vetter, I. Wolf, P. Hassenpflug, M. Hastenteufel, R. Ludwig, L. Grenacher, G. M. Richter, W. Uhl, M. W. B’chler, and H. P. Meinzer, “Navigation aids and real-time deformation modeling for open liver surgery,” , vol. 5029, p. 58, 2003.
    [Bibtex]
    @CONFERENCE{Vetter2003,
      author = {Vetter, M. and Wolf, I. and Hassenpflug, P. and Hastenteufel, M.
      and Ludwig, R. and Grenacher, L. and Richter, G.M. and Uhl, W. and
      B’chler, M.W. and Meinzer, H.P.},
      title = {Navigation aids and real-time deformation modeling for open liver
      surgery},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of SPIE},
      year = {2003},
      volume = {5029},
      pages = {58},
      file = {Vetter2003.pdf:Vetter2003.pdf:PDF},
      keywords = {APP, GUI, HES, VOR, SLR, SUR},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2011.01.26}
    }
  • J. Yamanaka, S. Saito, and J. Fujimoto, “Impact of preoperative planning using virtual segmental volumetry on liver resection for hepatocellular carcinoma,” World journal of surgery, vol. 31, iss. 6, pp. 1251-1257, 2007.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Yamanaka2007,
      author = {Yamanaka, J. and Saito, S. and Fujimoto, J.},
      title = {Impact of preoperative planning using virtual segmental volumetry
      on liver resection for hepatocellular carcinoma},
      journal = {World journal of surgery},
      year = {2007},
      volume = {31},
      pages = {1251 - 1257},
      number = {6},
      file = {Yamanaka2007.pdf:Yamanaka2007.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0364-2313},
      owner = {Thomas},
      publisher = {Springer},
      timestamp = {2011.01.31}
    }

Segmentation

  • K. T. Bae, M. L. Giger, C. T. Chen, and C. E. Kahn Jr, “Automatic segmentation of liver structure in CT images,” Medical Physics, vol. 20, p. 71, 1993.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Bae1993,
      author = {Bae, K.T. and Giger, M.L. and Chen, C.T. and Kahn Jr, C.E.},
      title = {Automatic segmentation of liver structure in CT images},
      journal = {Medical Physics},
      year = {1993},
      volume = {20},
      pages = {71},
      file = {Bae1993.pdf:Bae1993.pdf:PDF},
      keywords = {TEC},
      owner = {Thomas},
      timestamp = {2011.02.03}
    }
  • S. Bo, “Automatic Segmentation and 3D Reconstruction of Human Liver Based on CT Image,” Science, pp. 1-4, 2010.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Bo2010,
      author = {Bo, Song},
      title = {Automatic Segmentation and 3D Reconstruction of Human Liver Based
      on CT Image},
      journal = {Science},
      year = {2010},
      pages = {1-4},
      abstract = {3D shape reconstruction of the liver from its 2D cross- sections improves
      the surgeon’s knowledge of liver anatomy and makes even more complicated
      liver surgery safe, which can be employed to aid clinical practice
      as an alternative tool. In this paper, a new method for 3D reconstruction
      of liver is proposed. It mainly consists of three steps: liver auto-segmentation,
      surface reconstruction and surface rendering. Firstly, an effective
      automatic segmentation method based on graph-theory is proposed for
      extracting liver. Then, NMC algorithm based on a combination of MC
      and Cuberille algorithms is applied to accomplish surface reconstruction
      of liver. Finally, surface rendering of liver is implemented by 3D
      graphics library OpenGL. The method mentioned above is being tested
      on numerous experiments of 3D reconstruction of liver and results
      are promising.},
      file = {Bo2010.pdf:Bo2010.pdf:PDF},
      keywords = {Automatic Segmentation and 3D Reconstruction of Hu,liver, TEC},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • J. S. Chou, S. Y. J. Chen, G. S. Sudakoff, K. R. Hoffmann, C. T. Chen, and A. H. Dachman, “Image fusion for visualization of hepatic vasculature and tumors,” , vol. 2434, p. 157, 1995.
    [Bibtex]
    @CONFERENCE{Chou1995,
      author = {Chou, J.S. and Chen, S.Y.J. and Sudakoff, G.S. and Hoffmann, K.R.
      and Chen, C.T. and Dachman, A.H.},
      title = {Image fusion for visualization of hepatic vasculature and tumors},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of SPIE},
      year = {1995},
      volume = {2434},
      pages = {157},
      file = {Chou1995.pdf:Chou1995.pdf:PDF},
      keywords = {TEC, HES, SUR},
      owner = {Thomas},
      timestamp = {2011.02.01}
    }
  • L. Gao, D. G. Heath, B. S. Kuszyk, and E. K. Fishman, “Automatic liver segmentation technique for three-dimensional visualization of CT data.,” Radiology, vol. 201, iss. 2, p. 359, 1996.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Gao1996,
      author = {Gao, L. and Heath, D.G. and Kuszyk, B.S. and Fishman, E.K.},
      title = {Automatic liver segmentation technique for three-dimensional visualization
      of CT data.},
      journal = {Radiology},
      year = {1996},
      volume = {201},
      pages = {359},
      number = {2},
      file = {Gao1996.pdf:Gao1996.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0033-8419},
      keywords = {TEC, IMP},
      owner = {Thomas},
      publisher = {Radiological Society of North America},
      timestamp = {2011.02.03}
    }
  • T. Heimann, B. van Ginneken, M. A. Styner, Y. Arzhaeva, V. Aurich, C. Bauer, A. Beck, C. Becker, R. Beichel, G. Bekes, and others, “Comparison and evaluation of methods for liver segmentation from CT datasets,” Medical Imaging, IEEE Transactions on, vol. 28, iss. 8, pp. 1251-1265, 2009.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Heimann2009b,
      author = {Heimann, T. and van Ginneken, B. and Styner, M.A. and Arzhaeva, Y.
      and Aurich, V. and Bauer, C. and Beck, A. and Becker, C. and Beichel,
      R. and Bekes, G. and others},
      title = {Comparison and evaluation of methods for liver segmentation from
      CT datasets},
      journal = {Medical Imaging, IEEE Transactions on},
      year = {2009},
      volume = {28},
      pages = {1251 - 1265},
      number = {8},
      file = {Heimann2009b.pdf:Heimann2009b.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0278-0062},
      keywords = {TEC, IMP},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      publisher = {IEEE},
      timestamp = {2011.01.26}
    }
  • N. Inaoka, H. Suzuki, and M. Fukuda, “Hepatic blood vessel recognition using anatomical knowledge,” , vol. 1652, p. 509, 1992.
    [Bibtex]
    @CONFERENCE{Inaoka1992,
      author = {Inaoka, N. and Suzuki, H. and Fukuda, M.},
      title = {Hepatic blood vessel recognition using anatomical knowledge},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of SPIE},
      year = {1992},
      volume = {1652},
      pages = {509},
      file = {Inaoka1992.pdf:Inaoka1992.pdf:PDF},
      keywords = {TEC, HES},
      owner = {Thomas},
      timestamp = {2011.02.03}
    }
  • S. Matsushita, H. Oyamada, M. Kusakabe, and N. Suzuki, “Attempt to extract 3D image of liver automatically out of abdominal MRI,” , vol. 1898, pp. 803-808, 1993.
    [Bibtex]
    @CONFERENCE{Matsushita1993,
      author = {Matsushita, S. and Oyamada, H. and Kusakabe, M. and Suzuki, N.},
      title = {Attempt to extract 3D image of liver automatically out of abdominal
      MRI},
      booktitle = {Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) Conference
      Series},
      year = {1993},
      volume = {1898},
      pages = {803 - 808},
      file = {Matsushita1993.pdf:Matsushita1993.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0277-786X},
      keywords = {TEC},
      owner = {Thomas},
      timestamp = {2011.02.01}
    }
  • A. Schenk, G. Prause, and H. O. Peitgen, “Efficient semiautomatic segmentation of 3d objects in medical images,” , pp. 71-131, 2000.
    [Bibtex]
    @CONFERENCE{Schenk2000,
      author = {Schenk, A. and Prause, G. and Peitgen, H.O.},
      title = {Efficient semiautomatic segmentation of 3d objects in medical images},
      booktitle = {Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention - MICCAI
      2000},
      year = {2000},
      pages = {71 - 131},
      organization = {Springer},
      abstract = {We present a fast and accurate tool for semiautomatic segmentation
      of volumetric medical images based on the live wire algorithm, shape-based
      interpolation and a new optimization method. While the user-steered
      live wire algorithm represents an efficient, precise and reproducible
      method for interactive segmentation of selected two-dimensional images,
      the shape-based interpolation allows the automatic approximation
      of contours on slices between user-defined boundaries. The combination
      of both methods leads to accurate segmentations with significantly
      reduced user interaction time. Moreover, the subsequent automated
      optimization of the interpolated object contours results in a better
      segmentation quality or can be used to extend the distances between
      user-segmented images and for a further reduction of interaction
      time. Experiments were carried out on hepatic computer tomographies
      from three different clinics. The results of the segmentation of
      liver parenchyma have shown that the user interaction time can be
      reduced more than 60% by the combination of shape-based interpolation
      and our optimization method with volume deviations in the magnitude
      of inter-user differences.},
      file = {Schenk2000.pdf:Schenk2000.pdf:PDF},
      keywords = {IMP},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.12.01}
    }
  • Y. Shen, B. Wang, Y. Ju, J. Xie, and Xiaoyang Huang, “Interaction Techniques for the Exploration of Hepatic Vessel Structure,” in Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, 2005. IEEE-EMBS 2005. 27th Annual International Conference of the, 2005, pp. 2902-2905.
    [Bibtex]
    @INPROCEEDINGS{Shen2005,
      author = {Yi Shen and Boliang Wang and Ying Ju and Jiezhen Xie and Xiaoyang
      Huang},
      title = {Interaction Techniques for the Exploration of Hepatic Vessel Structure},
      booktitle = {Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, 2005. IEEE-EMBS 2005.
      27th Annual International Conference of the},
      year = {2005},
      pages = {2902 - 2905},
      abstract = {Hepatic vessel system is one of the most complex vessel systems in
      human body. For liver surgical planning, morphology and topology
      analysis of the hepatic vessel system is of our major interest. In
      this article, we present a new method to analyze the liver vessel
      system. Starting from the raw CT data set, vessel system is segmented.
      Based on that, then skeleton line of the vessel system is extracted
      and a symbolic vessel tree is constructed. The interactive analysis
      is achieved by combination of the abstract vessel tree information
      and the vessel surface model. The experimental results illustrate
      that the algorithm is effective, easy to implement, and addresses
      fully interaction facilities. The whole processing involves no human
      interventions, except the preprocessing of CT images},
      file = {Shen2005.pdf:Shen2005.pdf:PDF},
      keywords = {CT image preprocessing;abstract vessel tree information;hepatic vessel
      structure;interaction techniques;interactive analysis;liver surgical
      planning;morphology analysis;symbolic vessel tree;topology analysis;vessel
      surface model;vessel system segmentation;computerised tomography;image
      segmentation;liver;medical image processing;, TEC},
      owner = {Thomas},
      timestamp = {2011.01.31}
    }
  • L. Soler, H. Delingette, G. Malandain, N. Ayache, C. Koehl, J. Clement, O. Dourthe, and J. Marescaux, “An automatic virtual patient reconstruction from CT-scans for hepatic surgical planning,” Medicine meets virtual reality 2000: envisioning healing: interactive technology and the patient-practitioner dialogue, p. 316, 2000.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Soler2000,
      author = {Soler, L. and Delingette, H. and Malandain, G. and Ayache, N. and
      Koehl, C. and Clement, JM and Dourthe, O. and Marescaux, J.},
      title = {An automatic virtual patient reconstruction from CT-scans for hepatic
      surgical planning},
      journal = {Medicine meets virtual reality 2000: envisioning healing: interactive
      technology and the patient-practitioner dialogue},
      year = {2000},
      pages = {316},
      file = {Soler2000.pdf:Soler2000.pdf:PDF},
      isbn = {1586030140},
      keywords = {APP, PLA, PLA, HES, SUR, VOR},
      owner = {Thomas},
      publisher = {Ios Pr Inc},
      timestamp = {2011.01.31}
    }
  • L. Soler, H. Delingette, G. Malandain, J. Montagnat, N. Ayache, C. Koehl, O. Dourthe, B. Malassagne, M. Smith, D. Mutter, and others, “Fully automatic anatomical, pathological, and functional segmentation from CT scans for hepatic surgery,” Computer Aided Surgery, vol. 6, iss. 3, pp. 131-142, 2001.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Soler2001,
      author = {Soler, L. and Delingette, H. and Malandain, G. and Montagnat, J.
      and Ayache, N. and Koehl, C. and Dourthe, O. and Malassagne, B. and
      Smith, M. and Mutter, D. and others},
      title = {Fully automatic anatomical, pathological, and functional segmentation
      from CT scans for hepatic surgery},
      journal = {Computer Aided Surgery},
      year = {2001},
      volume = {6},
      pages = {131 - 142},
      number = {3},
      file = {Soler2001.pdf:Soler2001.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {1097-0150},
      keywords = {TEC, IMP},
      owner = {Thomas},
      publisher = {Wiley Online Library},
      timestamp = {2011.02.01}
    }

Vasculature

  • P. Dokládal, C. Lohou, L. Perroton, and G. Bertrand, “Liver Blood Vessels Extraction by a 3-D Topological Approach,” in Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention – MICCAI’99, C. Taylor and A. Colchester, Eds., Springer Berlin / Heidelberg, 1999, vol. 1679, pp. 98-105.
    [Bibtex]
    @INCOLLECTION{Dokladal1999,
      author = {Dokládal, Petr and Lohou, Christophe and Perroton, Laurent and Bertrand,
      Gilles},
      title = {Liver Blood Vessels Extraction by a 3-D Topological Approach},
      booktitle = {Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention – MICCAI’99},
      publisher = {Springer Berlin / Heidelberg},
      year = {1999},
      editor = {Taylor, Chris and Colchester, Alain},
      volume = {1679},
      series = {Lecture Notes in Computer Science},
      pages = {98 - 105},
      abstract = {We propose in this paper a new approach to segmentation of 3-D tomography
      of liver vessel system. The approach is based on a point-wise reconstruction
      with restriction to simple points manipulation to preserve the homotopy.
      We propose and compare two dual methods of the vessel system extraction.
      The efficiency of these methods is demonstrated on a raw X-ray tomography
      image. The desired level of detail in the vein ramification system
      is obtained by adjusting one parameter controlling the admitted level
      of light intensity. The paper is organized as follows: In the introductory
      section we present the main principles of the approach using simple
      points. We explain the algorithm as well as the aspects of efficient
      computer implementation. Experiment results for different parameter
      values are given together with discussion and conclusions.},
      affiliation = {ESIEE Cité Descartes, B.P. 99, 93 162 Noisy-le-Grand Cedex France
      France},
      file = {Dokladal1999.pdf:Dokladal1999.pdf:PDF},
      keywords = {TEC, IMP},
      owner = {Thomas},
      timestamp = {2011.02.01}
    }
  • Y. Masutani, Y. Yamauchi, M. Suzuki, Y. Ohta, T. Dohi, M. Tsuzuki, and D. Hashimoto, “Development of interactive vessel modelling system for hepatic vasculature from MR images,” Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing, vol. 33, iss. 1, pp. 97-101, 1995.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Masutani1995,
      author = {Masutani, Y. and Yamauchi, Y. and Suzuki, M. and Ohta, Y. and Dohi,
      T. and Tsuzuki, M. and Hashimoto, D.},
      title = {Development of interactive vessel modelling system for hepatic vasculature
      from MR images},
      journal = {Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing},
      year = {1995},
      volume = {33},
      pages = {97 - 101},
      number = {1},
      file = {Masutani1995.pdf:Masutani1995.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0140-0118},
      keywords = {TEC},
      owner = {Thomas},
      publisher = {Springer},
      timestamp = {2011.02.01}
    }
  • C. Zahlten, H. Jürgens, C. Evertsz, R. Leppek, H. O. Peitgen, and K. Klose, “Portal vein reconstruction based on topology,” European journal of radiology, vol. 19, iss. 2, pp. 96-100, 1995.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Zahlten1995,
      author = {Zahlten, C. and J{\\"u}rgens, H. and Evertsz, CJG and Leppek, R.
      and Peitgen, H.O. and Klose, KJ},
      title = {Portal vein reconstruction based on topology},
      journal = {European journal of radiology},
      year = {1995},
      volume = {19},
      pages = {96 - 100},
      number = {2},
      file = {Zahlten1995.pdf:Zahlten1995.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0720-048X},
      owner = {Thomas},
      publisher = {Elsevier},
      timestamp = {2011.02.01}
    }

Simulation

  • H. Courtecuisse, H. Jung, J. Allard, Christian Duriez, D. Y. Lee, and S. Cotin, “GPU-based real-time soft tissue deformation with cutting and haptic feedback,” Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology, vol. 103, iss. 2-3, pp. 159-168, 2010.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Courtecuisse2010,
      author = {Hadrien Courtecuisse and Hoeryong Jung and Jérémie Allard and Christian
      Duriez and Doo Yong Lee and Stéphane Cotin},
      title = {GPU-based real-time soft tissue deformation with cutting and haptic
      feedback},
      journal = {Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology},
      year = {2010},
      volume = {103},
      pages = {159 - 168},
      number = {2-3},
      abstract = {This article describes a series of contributions in the field of real-time
      simulation of soft tissue biomechanics. These contributions address
      various requirements for interactive simulation of complex surgical
      procedures. In particular, this article presents results in the areas
      of soft tissue deformation, contact modelling, simulation of cutting,
      and haptic rendering, which are all relevant to a variety of medical
      interventions. The contributions described in this article share
      a common underlying model of deformation and rely on GPU implementations
      to significantly improve computation times. This consistency in the
      modelling technique and computational approach ensures coherent results
      as well as efficient, robust and flexible solutions.},
      file = {Courtecuisse2010.pdf:Courtecuisse2010.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0079-6107},
      keywords = {Biomechanics, PRS, TEC},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2011.01.26}
    }
  • B. Dagon, C. Baur, and V. Bettschart, “Real-time update of 3D deformable models for computer aided liver surgery,” , pp. 1-4, 2009.
    [Bibtex]
    @CONFERENCE{Dagon2009,
      author = {Dagon, B. and Baur, C. and Bettschart, V.},
      title = {Real-time update of 3D deformable models for computer aided liver
      surgery},
      booktitle = {Pattern Recognition, 2008. ICPR 2008. 19th International Conference
      on},
      year = {2009},
      pages = {1 - 4},
      organization = {IEEE},
      abstract = {Providing accurate image-guidance for soft-tissue interventions remains
      a complex task. Most of the time, preoperative models and planning
      data are no more valid during the surgical process due to motions
      and deformations of the organ of interest. In this paper, two core
      components of a computer-assisted system for liver surgery are presented.
      One is an ultrasound segmentation techniques that allows for automatic
      liver vessels detection and the other is a mass-spring based deformable
      model used to update the shape of 3D models. Both have real-time
      capabilities and enable to update intraoperatively the data created
      during the planning phase.},
      file = {Dagon2009.pdf:Dagon2009.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {1051-4651},
      keywords = {TEC, PRS, HES},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.11.08}
    }
  • P. Dumpuri, L. W. Clements, B. M. Dawant, and M. I. Miga, “Model-updated image-guided liver surgery: Preliminary results using surface characterization.,” Progress in biophysics and molecular biology, iss. September, pp. 1-11, 2010.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Dumpuri2010,
      author = {Dumpuri, Prashanth and Clements, Logan W and Dawant, Benoit M and
      Miga, Michael I},
      title = {Model-updated image-guided liver surgery: Preliminary results using
      surface characterization.},
      journal = {Progress in biophysics and molecular biology},
      year = {2010},
      pages = {1-11},
      number = {September},
      month = {September},
      abstract = {The current protocol for image guidance in open abdominal liver tumor
      removal surgeries involves a rigid registration between the patient's
      operating room space and the pre-operative diagnostic image-space.
      Systematic studies have shown that the liver can deform up to 2cm
      during surgeries in a non-rigid fashion thereby compromising the
      accuracy of these surgical navigation systems. Compensating for intra-operative
      deformations using mathematical models has shown promising results.
      In this work, we follow up the initial rigid registration with a
      computational approach that is geared towards minimizing the residual
      closest point distances between the un-deformed pre-operative surface
      and the rigidly registered intra-operative surface. We also use a
      surface Laplacian equation based filter that generates a realistic
      deformation field. Preliminary validation of the proposed computational
      framework was performed using phantom experiments and clinical trials.
      The proposed framework improved the rigid registration errors for
      the phantom experiments on average by 43\%, and 74\% using partial
      and full surface data, respectively. With respect to clinical data,
      it improved the closest point residual error associated with rigid
      registration by 68\% on average for the clinical cases. These results
      are highly encouraging and suggest that computational models can
      be used to increase the accuracy of image-guided open abdominal liver
      tumor removal surgeries.},
      file = {Dumpuri2010.pdf:Dumpuri2010.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {1873-1732},
      keywords = {finite element analysis,image-guided liver surgeries,linear elastic
      model,methods, APP, HES, GUI},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      pmid = {20869385},
      publisher = {Elsevier Ltd},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • S. Lee, A. Chung, M. Lerotic, M. a Hawkins, D. Tait, and G. Yang, “Dynamic shape instantiation for intra-operative guidance.,” Medical image computing and computer-assisted intervention : MICCAI … International Conference on Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention, vol. 13, iss. Pt 1, pp. 69-76, 2010.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Lee2010a,
      author = {Lee, Su-Lin and Chung, Adrian and Lerotic, Mirna and Hawkins, Maria
      a and Tait, Diana and Yang, Guang-Zhong},
      title = {Dynamic shape instantiation for intra-operative guidance.},
      journal = {Medical image computing and computer-assisted intervention : MICCAI
      ... International Conference on Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted
      Intervention},
      year = {2010},
      volume = {13},
      pages = {69-76},
      number = {Pt 1},
      month = {January},
      abstract = {Primary liver cancer and oligometastatic liver disease are one of
      the major causes of mortality worldwide and its treatment ranges
      from surgery to more minimally invasive ablative procedures. With
      the increasing availability of minimally invasive hepatic approaches,
      a real-time method of determining the 3D structure of the liver and
      its location during the respiratory cycle is clinically important.
      However, during treatment, it is difficult to acquire images spanning
      the entire 3D volume rapidly. In this paper, a dynamic 3D shape instantiation
      scheme is developed for providing subject-specific optimal scan planning.
      Using only limited planar information, it is possible to instantiate
      the entire 3D geometry of the organ of interest. The efficacy of
      the proposed method is demonstrated with both detailed numerical
      simulation and a liver phantom with known ground-truth data. Preliminary
      clinical application of the technique is evaluated on a patient group
      with metastatic liver tumours.},
      file = {Lee2010a.pdf:Lee2010a.pdf:PDF},
      keywords = {intra-operative guidance,patient-specific deformation analysis,regression
      analysis,shape instantiation,shape modeling, TEC},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      pmid = {20879216},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • L. Maier-Hein, S. A. Müller, F. Pianka, S. Wörz, B. P. Müller-Stich, A. Seitel, K. Rohr, H. P. Meinzer, B. M. Schmied, and I. Wolf, “Respiratory motion compensation for CT-guided interventions in the liver,” Computer Aided Surgery, vol. 13, iss. 3, pp. 125-138, 2008.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Maier2008,
      author = {Maier-Hein, L. and M{\\"u}ller, S.A. and Pianka, F. and W{\\"o}rz,
      S. and M{\\"u}ller-Stich, B.P. and Seitel, A. and Rohr, K. and Meinzer,
      H.P. and Schmied, B.M. and Wolf, I.},
      title = {Respiratory motion compensation for CT-guided interventions in the
      liver},
      journal = {Computer Aided Surgery},
      year = {2008},
      volume = {13},
      pages = {125 - 138},
      number = {3},
      issn = {1092-9088},
      keywords = {TEC, HES},
      publisher = {Informa UK Ltd UK}
    }

Reviews

  • F. Banovac, J. Bruno, J. Wright, and K. Cleary, “Thoracoabdominal Interventions,” Image-Guided Interventions, pp. 387-407, 2008.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Banovac2008,
      author = {Banovac, F. and Bruno, J. and Wright, J. and Cleary, K.},
      title = {Thoracoabdominal Interventions},
      journal = {Image-Guided Interventions},
      year = {2008},
      pages = {387 - 407},
      note = {Chapter 13},
      file = {Banovac2008.pdf:Banovac2008.pdf:PDF},
      keywords = {REV, TAS},
      owner = {Thomas},
      publisher = {Springer},
      timestamp = {2011.02.28}
    }
  • L. Grenacher, M. Thorn, H. Knaebel, M. Vetter, P. Hassenpflug, T. Kraus, H. Meinzer, M. Büchler, G. Kauffmann, and G. Richter, “The role of 3-D imaging and computer-based postprocessing for surgery of the liver and pancreas,” R\öFo: Fortschritte auf dem Gebiete der R\öntgenstrahlen und der Nuklearmedizin, vol. 177, iss. 9, p. 1219, 2005.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Grenacher2005,
      author = {Grenacher, L. and Thorn, M. and Knaebel, HP and Vetter, M. and Hassenpflug,
      P. and Kraus, T. and Meinzer, HP and B{\\"u}chler, MW and Kauffmann,
      GW and Richter, GM},
      title = {The role of 3-D imaging and computer-based postprocessing for surgery
      of the liver and pancreas},
      journal = {R{\\"o}Fo: Fortschritte auf dem Gebiete der R{\\"o}ntgenstrahlen
      und der Nuklearmedizin},
      year = {2005},
      volume = {177},
      pages = {1219},
      number = {9},
      issn = {1438-9029},
      owner = {Thomas},
      timestamp = {2011.02.28}
    }
  • H. Ibrahim, “A review on computer aided hepatocellular carcinoma treatment planning,” in Electronics and Information Engineering (ICEIE), 2010 International Conference On, 2010, p. V1-158 -V1-161.
    [Bibtex]
    @INPROCEEDINGS{Ibrahim2010,
      author = {Ibrahim, H.},
      title = {A review on computer aided hepatocellular carcinoma treatment planning},
      booktitle = {Electronics and Information Engineering (ICEIE), 2010 International
      Conference On},
      year = {2010},
      volume = {1},
      pages = {V1-158 -V1-161},
      month = {August},
      abstract = {Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is currently one of life threatening
      diseases related to the liver. Current clinical practices suggest
      that with aid of computer in treatment planning, this can significantly
      improves the treatment received by the patients. Therefore, in this
      paper, a review on computer aided HCC pre-surgical planning has been
      carried out. This review covers several important aspects that need
      to be considered on building a successful pre-surgical planning system.
      These include the common imaging modalities used in liver diagnosis,
      several 3D visualization techniques, some basic ideas on surface
      rendering, and the important liver components used in pre-surgical
      planning.},
      file = {:Ibrahim2010.pdf:PDF},
      keywords = {3D visualization techniques;clinical practices;common imaging modalities;computer
      aided Hepatocellular carcinoma treatment planning;life threatening
      diseases;liver diagnosis;patient treatment;presurgical planning;surface
      rendering;biomedical imaging;diseases;liver;medical computing;rendering
      (computer graphics);surgery;},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.11.02}
    }

 

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