Outcome

Dick – Real-time structural simulation and 3D visualisation for hip arthroplasty

References

Aesthetics

  • A. Bottino, P. Torino, A. Laurentini, and L. Rosano, “A New Computer-aided Technique for Planning the Aesthetic Outcome of Plastic Surgery,” , 2008.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Bottino2008,
      author = {Bottino, Andrea and Torino, Politecnico and Laurentini, Aldo and
      Rosano, Luisa},
      title = {A New Computer-aided Technique for Planning the Aesthetic Outcome
      of Plastic Surgery},
      year = {2008},
      abstract = {Plastic surgery plays a major role in today health care. Planning
      plastic face surgery requires dealing with the elusive concept of
      attractiveness for evaluating feasible beautification of a particular
      face. The existing computer tools essentially allow to manually warp
      2D images or 3D face scans, in order to produce images simulating
      possible surgery outcomes. How to manipulate faces, as well as the
      evaluation of the results, are left to the surgeon’s judgement. We
      propose a new quantitative approach able to automatically suggest
      effective patient-specific improvements of facial attractiveness.
      The general idea is to compare the face of the patient with a large
      database of attractive faces, excluding the facial feature to be
      improved. Then, the feature of the faces more similar is applied,
      with a suitable morphing, to the face of the patient. In this paper
      we present a first application of the general idea in the field of
      nose surgery. Aesthetically effective rhinoplasty is suggested on
      the base of the entire face profile, a very important 2D feature
      for rating face attractiveness.},
      file = {Bottino2008.pdf:Bottino2008.pdf:PDF},
      keywords = {automatic beautification,face profile,plastic surgery,rhinoplasty,
      APP, PLA, OCS, CMS},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • M. Chabanas, V. Luboz, and Y. Payan, “Patient specific finite element model of the face soft tissues for computer-assisted maxillofacial surgery,” Medical Image Analysis, vol. 7, iss. 2, pp. 131-151, 2003.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Chabanas2003,
      author = {Chabanas, Matthieu and Luboz, Vincent and Payan, Yohan},
      title = {Patient specific finite element model of the face soft tissues for
      computer-assisted maxillofacial surgery},
      journal = {Medical Image Analysis},
      year = {2003},
      volume = {7},
      pages = {131-151},
      number = {2},
      month = {June},
      abstract = {This paper addresses the prediction of face soft tissue deformations
      resulting from bone repositioning in maxillofacial surgery. A generic
      3D Finite Element model of the face soft tissues was developed. Face
      muscles are defined in the mesh as embedded structures, with different
      mechanical properties (transverse isotropy, stiffness depending on
      muscle contraction). Simulations of face deformations under muscle
      actions can thus be performed. In the context of maxillofacial surgery,
      this generic soft-tissue model is automatically conformed to patient
      morphology by elastic registration, using skin and skull surfaces
      segmented from a CT scan. Some elements of the patient mesh could
      be geometrically distorted during the registration, which disables
      Finite Element analysis. Irregular elements are thus detected and
      automatically regularized. This semi-automatic patient model generation
      is robust, fast and easy to use. Therefore it seems compatible with
      clinical use. Six patient models were successfully built, and simulations
      of soft tissue deformations resulting from bone displacements performed
      on two patient models. Both the adequation of the models to the patient
      morphologies and the simulations of post-operative aspects were qualitatively
      validated by five surgeons. Their conclusions are that the models
      fit the morphologies of the patients, and that the predicted soft
      tissue modifications are coherent with what they would expect.},
      file = {Chabanas2003.pdf:Chabanas2003.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {13618415},
      keywords = {computer aided maxillofacial surgery,elastic registration,finite element
      mesh regularity,finite element method,mesh conformation, TEC, OCS,
      CMS, SUR},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • M. Chabanas, C. Marecaux, Y. Payan, and F. Boutault, “Computer aided planning for orthognatic surgery,” ArXiv Physics e-prints, 2006.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Chabanas2006,
      author = {Chabanas, M. and Marecaux, C. and Payan, Y. and Boutault, F.},
      title = {Computer aided planning for orthognatic surgery},
      journal = {ArXiv Physics e-prints},
      year = {2006},
      month = {October},
      abstract = {A computer aided maxillofacial sequence is presented, applied to orthognatic
      surgery. It consists of 5 main stages: data acquisition and integration,
      surgical planning, surgical simulation, and per operative assistance.
      The planning and simulation steps are then addressed in a way that
      is clinically relevant. First concepts toward a 3D cephalometry are
      presented for a morphological analysis, surgical planning, and bone
      and soft tissue simulation. The aesthetic surgical outcomes of bone
      repositioning are studied with a biomechanical Finite Element soft
      tissue model.},
      eprint = {arXiv:physics/0610213},
      file = {Chabanas2006.pdf:Chabanas2006.pdf:PDF},
      keywords = {Physics - Medical Physics, APP, CMS, PLA, GUI, OCS, SUR},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.10.26}
    }
  • E. Gladilin, S. Zachow, P. Deuflhard, and H. C. Hege, “Realistic prediction of individual facial emotion expressions for craniofacial surgery simulations,” , vol. 5029, p. 520, 2003.
    [Bibtex]
    @CONFERENCE{Gladilin2003,
      author = {Gladilin, E. and Zachow, S. and Deuflhard, P. and Hege, H.C.},
      title = {Realistic prediction of individual facial emotion expressions for
      craniofacial surgery simulations},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of SPIE},
      year = {2003},
      volume = {5029},
      pages = {520},
      file = {Gladilin2003.pdf:Gladilin2003.pdf:PDF},
      keywords = {APP, CMS, PLA, OCS},
      owner = {Thomas},
      timestamp = {2011.02.03}
    }
  • E. Keeve, S. Girod, P. Pfeifle, and B. Girod, “Anatomy-Based Facial Tissue Modeling Using the Finite Element Method,” , 1996.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Keeve1996b,
      author = {Keeve, Erwin and Girod, Sabine and Pfeifle, Paula and Girod, Bernd},
      title = {Anatomy-Based Facial Tissue Modeling Using the Finite Element Method},
      year = {1996},
      abstract = {Anatomy-based facial tissue modeling for surgical simulation is a
      field whose time has come. Real-time facial animation has been created
      in the last few years using models based on the anatomical structure
      of the human skin. Anatomy-based models are also under development
      in the field of medical visualization, with which facial surgery
      can be realistically simulated. In this article we present an anatomy-based
      3D finite element tissue model. Integrated into a computer-aided
      surgical planning system this model allows the precise prediction
      of soft tissue changes resulting from the realignment of the underlying
      bone structure. The model has already been used in our Department
      of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and has improved craniofacial surgical
      planning procedures. The model is described in detail and surgical
      simulation results are shown and discussed.},
      file = {Keeve1996b.pdf:Keeve1996b.pdf:PDF},
      keywords = {computer-aided surgery,finite element method,human facial modeling,surgery
      planning and simulation, TEC},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • H. Kim, P. Jürgens, L. Nolte, and M. Reyes, “Anatomically-Driven Soft-Tissue Simulation Strategy for Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery Using Facial Muscle Template Model,” in Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention – MICCAI 2010, T. Jiang, N. Navab, J. Pluim, and M. Viergever, Eds., Springer Berlin / Heidelberg, 2010, vol. 6361, pp. 61-68.
    [Bibtex]
    @INCOLLECTION{Kim2010a,
      author = {Kim, Hyungmin and Jürgens, Philipp and Nolte, Lutz-Peter and Reyes,
      Mauricio},
      title = {Anatomically-Driven Soft-Tissue Simulation Strategy for Cranio-Maxillofacial
      Surgery Using Facial Muscle Template Model},
      booktitle = {Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention – MICCAI
      2010},
      publisher = {Springer Berlin / Heidelberg},
      year = {2010},
      editor = {Jiang, Tianzi and Navab, Nassir and Pluim, Josien and Viergever,
      Max},
      volume = {6361},
      series = {Lecture Notes in Computer Science},
      pages = {61 - 68},
      abstract = {We propose a computationally efficient and bio-mechanically relevant
      soft-tissue simulation method for cranio-maxillofacial (CMF) surgery.
      A template-based facial muscle reconstruction was introduced to minimize
      the efforts on preparing a patient-specific model. A transversely
      isotropic mass-tensor model (MTM) was adopted to realize the effect
      of directional property of facial muscles in reasonable computation
      time. Additionally, sliding contact around teeth and mucosa was considered
      for more realistic simulation. Retrospective validation study with
      post-operative scan of a real patient showed that there were considerable
      improvements in simulation accuracy by incorporating template-based
      facial muscle anatomy and sliding contact.},
      affiliation = {Institute for Surgical Technology and Biomechanics, University of
      Bern, Stauffacherstrasse 78, 3014 Bern, Switzerland},
      file = {Kim2010a.pdf:Kim2010a.pdf:PDF},
      keywords = {TEC, CMS, OCS},
      owner = {Thomas},
      timestamp = {2011.02.14}
    }
  • H. Kim, P. Jürgens, S. Weber, Lutz-Peter Nolte, and M. Reyes, “A new soft-tissue simulation strategy for cranio-maxillofacial surgery using facial muscle template model,” Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology, vol. 103, iss. 2-3, pp. 284-291, 2010.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Kim2010b,
      author = {Hyungmin Kim and Philipp Jürgens and Stefan Weber and Lutz-Peter
      Nolte and Mauricio Reyes},
      title = {A new soft-tissue simulation strategy for cranio-maxillofacial surgery
      using facial muscle template model},
      journal = {Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology},
      year = {2010},
      volume = {103},
      pages = {284 - 291},
      number = {2-3},
      note = {Special Issue on Biomechanical Modelling of Soft Tissue Motion},
      abstract = {We propose a computationally efficient, bio-mechanically relevant
      soft-tissue simulation method for cranio-maxillofacial (CMF) surgery.
      Special emphasis is given to comply with the current clinical workflow.
      A template-based facial muscle prediction was introduced to avoid
      laborious segmentation from medical images. In addition, transversely
      isotropic mass-tensor model (MTM) was applied to realize the directional
      behavior of facial muscles in short computation time. Finally, sliding
      contact was incorporated to mimic realistic boundary condition in
      error-sensitive regions. Mechanical simulation result was compared
      with commercial finite element software. And retrospective validation
      study with post-operative scan of four CMF cases was performed.},
      file = {Kim2010b.pdf:Kim2010b.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0079-6107},
      keywords = {Soft-tissue simulation, TEC, OCS, CMS},
      owner = {Thomas},
      timestamp = {2011.02.14}
    }
  • R. M. Koch, Methods for physics based facial surgery prediction, Hartung-Gorre, 2001.
    [Bibtex]
    @BOOK{Koch2001,
      title = {Methods for physics based facial surgery prediction},
      publisher = {Hartung-Gorre},
      year = {2001},
      author = {Koch, R.M.},
      file = {Koch2001.pdf:Koch2001.pdf:PDF},
      isbn = {389649712X},
      keywords = {APP, CMS, OCS, PLA},
      owner = {Thomas},
      timestamp = {2011.02.08}
    }
  • C. Marchetti, A. Bianchi, L. Muyldermans, D. M. Martino, L. Lancellotti, and A. Sarti, “Validation of new soft tissue software in orthognathic surgery planning,” International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, vol. 40, iss. 1, pp. 26-32, 2011.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Marchetti2011,
      author = {C. Marchetti and A. Bianchi and L. Muyldermans and M. Di Martino
      and L. Lancellotti and A. Sarti},
      title = {Validation of new soft tissue software in orthognathic surgery planning},
      journal = {International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery},
      year = {2011},
      volume = {40},
      pages = {26 - 32},
      number = {1},
      abstract = {This study tests computer imaging software (SurgiCase-CMF®, Materialise)
      that enables surgeons to perform virtual orthognathic surgical planning
      using a three dimensional (3D) utility that previews the final shape
      of hard and soft tissues. It includes a soft tissue simulation module
      that has created images of soft tissues altered through bimaxillary
      orthognathic surgery to correct facial deformities. Cephalometric
      radiographs and CT scans were taken of each patient before and after
      surgery. The surgical planning system consists of four stages: CT
      data reconstruction; 3D model generation of facial hard and soft
      tissue; different virtual surgical planning and simulation modes;
      and various preoperative previews of the soft tissues. Surgical planning
      and simulation is based on a 3D CT reconstructed bone model and soft
      tissue image generation is based on physical algorithms. The software
      rapidly follows clinical options to generate a series of simulations
      and soft tissue models; to avoid TMJ functional problems, pre-surgical
      plans were evaluated by an orthodontist. Comparing simulation results
      with postoperative CT data, the reliability of the soft tissues preview
      was >91%. SurgiCase® software can provide a realistic, accurate forecast
      of the patient's facial appearance after surgery.},
      file = {Marchetti2011.pdf:Marchetti2011.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0901-5027},
      keywords = {computer imaging software, OCS, CMS, APP, PLA},
      owner = {Thomas},
      timestamp = {2011.02.15}
    }
  • A. Westermark, S. Zachow, and B. L. Eppley, “Three-dimensional osteotomy planning in maxillofacial surgery including soft tissue prediction,” Journal of Craniofacial Surgery, vol. 16, iss. 1, p. 100, 2005.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Westermark2005,
      author = {Westermark, A. and Zachow, S. and Eppley, B.L.},
      title = {Three-dimensional osteotomy planning in maxillofacial surgery including
      soft tissue prediction},
      journal = {Journal of Craniofacial Surgery},
      year = {2005},
      volume = {16},
      pages = {100},
      number = {1},
      abstract = {Preoperative planning of complex osteotomies in craniomaxillofacial
      surgery, in conjunction with a surgeon’s expertise, is essential
      for achieving an optimal result. However, the soft tissue changes
      that accompany facial bone movements cannot yet be accurately predicted.
      Bony tissue, because of its greater density, can be better predicted,
      but it alone does not account for the final aesthetic result. A new
      approach using not only three-dimensional (3-D) surface models of
      the patient’s anatomy, but also a corresponding volumetric model,
      is dis-
      
      cussed. This 3-D planning software was used in the treatment of 15
      patients and was found to provide a good correlation between simulation
      and postoperative outcome.},
      file = {Westermark2005.pdf:Westermark2005.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {1049-2275},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2011.01.03}
    }

Kinematics & Impingement

  • a Digioiaiii, B. Jaramaz, C. Nikou, R. Labarca, J. Moody, and B. Colgan, “Surgical navigation for total hip replacement with the use of hipnav,” Operative Techniques in Orthopaedics, vol. 10, iss. 1, pp. 3-8, 2000.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Digioiaiii2000,
      author = {Digioiaiii, a and Jaramaz, B and Nikou, C and Labarca, R and Moody,
      J and Colgan, B},
      title = {Surgical navigation for total hip replacement with the use of hipnav},
      journal = {Operative Techniques in Orthopaedics},
      year = {2000},
      volume = {10},
      pages = {3-8},
      number = {1},
      month = {January},
      abstract = {HipNax; an image-guided surgical navigation system, is presented.
      The system was developed to measure and guide the placement of prosthetic
      components in total hip replacement surgery (THR), it incorporates
      a 3-dimensional preoperative planner with a simulator and an intraoperative
      surgical navigator. Coupling optimized preoperative planning with
      accurate surgical navigation will assist the surgeon in properly
      orienting the components, minimizing the risk of impingement and
      dislocation, lntraoperatively, the system uses image-guided tools
      to assist in accurate placement of the acetabular cup. The acetabular
      implant is placed in the planned position with the aid of a simple
      "aim-and-shoot" interface. The actual measurements of version and
      abduction are also provided. The use of this new class of operative
      sensors has been incorporated into a regular surgical routine. There
      are few additional steps necessary, therefore, for the image-guided
      procedure, which does not add significantly to the total time of
      surgery. We expect that these tools will lead to less invasive and
      more accurate THR surgery and directly relate patient outcomes to
      measured surgical practice.},
      file = {Digioiaiii2000.pdf:Digioiaiii2000.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {10486666},
      keywords = {3-dimensional planner,4 the leading,a significant clinical problem,after
      total hip replacement,dislocation continues to be,mechanisms of dislocation
      are,orientation,prosthetic impingement,simulation,surgery,surgical
      navigation,thr,total hip replacement, APP, PLA, GUI, OCS},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • Q. Hu, U. Langlotz, J. Lawrence, F. Langlotz, and L. P. Nolte, “A fast impingement detection algorithm for computer-aided orthopedic surgery,” Computer Aided Surgery, vol. 6, iss. 2, pp. 104-110, 2001.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Hu2001,
      author = {Hu, Q. and Langlotz, U. and Lawrence, J. and Langlotz, F. and Nolte,
      L.P.},
      title = {A fast impingement detection algorithm for computer-aided orthopedic
      surgery},
      journal = {Computer Aided Surgery},
      year = {2001},
      volume = {6},
      pages = {104 - 110},
      number = {2},
      file = {Hu2001.pdf:Hu2001.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {1097-0150},
      keywords = {OCS, TEC, OTS},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      publisher = {Wiley Online Library},
      timestamp = {2011.01.06}
    }
  • P. R. Krekel, P. W. de Bruin, E. R. Valstar, F. H. Post, P. M. Rozing, and C. P. Botha, “Evaluation of bone impingement prediction in pre-operative planning for shoulder arthroplasty,” Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part H: Journal of Engineering in Medicine, vol. 223, iss. 7, pp. 813-822, 2009.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Krekel2009,
      author = {Krekel, P R and de Bruin, P W and Valstar, E R and Post, F H and
      Rozing, P M and Botha, C P},
      title = {Evaluation of bone impingement prediction in pre-operative planning
      for shoulder arthroplasty},
      journal = {Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part H: Journal
      of Engineering in Medicine},
      year = {2009},
      volume = {223},
      pages = {813-822},
      number = {7},
      month = {October},
      abstract = {In shoulder arthroplasty, malpositioning of pros-theses often leads
      to reduced post- operative range of motion (ROM) and complications
      such as impingement, loosening, and dislocation. Furthermore, the
      risk of impingement complications increases when reverse total prostheses
      are used. For this purpose a pre-operative planning system was developed
      that enables surgeons to perform a virtual shoulder replacement procedure.
      Our pre-operative planning system simulates patient-specific bone-determined
      ROM meant to reduce the risk of impingement complications and to
      improve the ROM of patients undergoing shoulder replacement surgery.
      This paper describes a validation experiment with the purpose of
      ratifying the clinical applicability and usefulness of the ROM simulation
      module for shoulder replacement surgery. The experiment was performed
      on cadaveric shoulders. A data connection was set up between the
      software environment and an existing intra-operative guidance system
      to track the relative positions of the bones. This allowed the patient-specific
      surface models to be visualized within the software for the position
      and alignment of the tracked bones. For both shoulders, ROM measurements
      were recorded and tagged with relevant information such as the type
      of prosthesis and the type ofmovement that was performed. The observed
      ROM and occurrences of impingement were compared with the simulated
      equivalents. The median deviation between observed impingement angles
      and simulated impingement angles was 20.30u with an interquartile
      range of 5.20u (from 23.40u to 1.80u). It was concluded that the
      ROM simulator is sufficiently accurate to fulfil its role as a supportive
      instrument for orthopaedic surgeons during shoulder replacement surgery.},
      file = {Krekel2009.pdf:Krekel2009.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0954-4119},
      keywords = {arthroplasty,medical visualization,motion,motion tracking,pre-operative
      planning,range of,shoulder, TEC, OCS},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • [PDF] P. R. Krekel, E. R. Valstar, J. D. Groot, F. H. Post, R. G. H. H. Nelissen, and C. P. Botha, “Visual Analysis of Multi-Joint Kinematic Data,” Symposium A Quarterly Journal In Modern Foreign Literatures, vol. 29, iss. 3, 2010.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Krekel2010a,
      author = {Krekel, Peter R and Valstar, Edward R and Groot, Jurriaan De and
      Post, Frits H and Nelissen, Rob G H H and Botha, Charl P},
      title = {Visual Analysis of Multi-Joint Kinematic Data},
      journal = {Symposium A Quarterly Journal In Modern Foreign Literatures},
      year = {2010},
      volume = {29},
      number = {3},
      abstract = {Kinematics is the analysis ofmotionswithout regarding forces or inertial
      effects,with the purpose of understanding joint behaviour. Kinematic
      data of linked joints, for example the upper extremity, i.e. the
      shoulder and arm joints, contains many related degrees of freedom
      that complicate numerical analysis. Visualisation techniques enhance
      the analysis process, thus improving the effectiveness of kinematic
      experiments. This paper describes a new visualisation systemspecifically
      designed for the analysis of multi-joint kinematic data of the upper
      extremity. The challenge inherent in the data is that the upper extremity
      is comprised of five cooper- ating joints with a total of fifteen
      degrees of freedom. The range of motion may be affected by subtle
      deficiencies of individual joints that are difficult to pinpoint.
      To highlight these subtleties our approach combines interactive filtering
      and multiple visualisation techniques. Our system is further differentiated
      by the fact that it integrates simultaneous acquisition and visual
      analysis of biokinematic data. Also, to facilitate complex queries,
      we have designed a visual query interface with visualisation and
      interaction elements that are based on the domain-specific anatomical
      representation of the data. The combi- nation of these techniques
      form an effective approach specifically tailored for the investigation
      and comparison of large collections of kinematic data. This claim
      is supported by an evaluation experiment where the technique was
      used to inspect the kinematics of the left and right arm of a patient
      with a healed proximal humerus fracture, i.e. a healed shoulder fracture.},
      file = {Krekel2010a.pdf:Krekel2010a.pdf:PDF},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      pdf = {http://graphics.tudelft.nl/publications/Krekel2010a.pdf},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22},
      url = {http://graphics.tudelft.nl/Publications/Krekel2010a}
    }

Blood Flow

  • G. Abdoulaev, S. Cadeddu, G. Delussu, M. Donizelli, L. Formaggia, A. Giachetti, E. Gobbetti, A. Leone, C. Manzi, P. Pili, and others, “ViVa: The Virtual Vascular Project,” IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY IN BIOMEDICINE, vol. 2, iss. 4, 1998.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Abdoulaev1998,
      author = {Abdoulaev, G. and Cadeddu, S. and Delussu, G. and Donizelli, M. and
      Formaggia, L. and Giachetti, A. and Gobbetti, E. and Leone, A. and
      Manzi, C. and Pili, P. and others},
      title = {ViVa: The Virtual Vascular Project},
      journal = {IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY IN BIOMEDICINE},
      year = {1998},
      volume = {2},
      number = {4},
      file = {Abdoulaev1998.pdf:Abdoulaev1998.pdf:PDF},
      keywords = {TEC},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2011.01.07}
    }
  • A. M. Morega, A. Dobre, M. Morega, and D. Mocanu, “Computational Modeling of Arterial Blood Flow,” in International Conference on Advancements of Medicine and Health Care through Technology, R. Magjarevic, S. Vlad, R. V. Ciupa, and A. I. Nicu, Eds., Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2009, vol. 26, pp. 373-378.
    [Bibtex]
    @INCOLLECTION{Morega2009,
      author = {Morega, A. M. and Dobre, A. and Morega, M. and Mocanu, D.},
      title = {Computational Modeling of Arterial Blood Flow},
      booktitle = {International Conference on Advancements of Medicine and Health Care
      through Technology},
      publisher = {Springer Berlin Heidelberg},
      year = {2009},
      editor = {Magjarevic, Ratko and Vlad, Simona and Ciupa, Radu V. and Nicu, Anca
      I.},
      volume = {26},
      series = {IFMBE Proceedings},
      pages = {373 - 378},
      abstract = {Recently, there is a growing interest in developing numerical methods
      and tools to investigate the hemodynamics of the arterial flow, and
      to understand its influence on the transport of solutes (e.g., oxygen),
      nutrients, etc. As arteries morphology is complex and patient-related,
      medical data based reconstruction of the geometry may be utilized
      to generate realistic computational domains. The blood flow is then
      investigated by finite element method (FEM) for a range of flow parameters.
      The flow patterns thus obtained may be utilized for vascular surgery
      training, planning and intervention, to investigate atherosclerosis
      genesis, in drug targeting, etc.},
      affiliation = {University POLITEHNICA of Bucharest Faculty of Electrical Engineering
      Romania},
      file = {Morega2009.pdf:Morega2009.pdf:PDF},
      isbn = {978-3-642-04292-8},
      keyword = {Engineering},
      keywords = {OCS},
      owner = {Thomas},
      timestamp = {2011.02.23}
    }
  • A. Qiao and Y. Liu, “Medical application oriented blood flow simulation,” Clinical Biomechanics, vol. 23, iss. Supplement 1, p. S130 – S136, 2008.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Qiao2008,
      author = {Aike Qiao and Youjun Liu},
      title = {Medical application oriented blood flow simulation},
      journal = {Clinical Biomechanics},
      year = {2008},
      volume = {23},
      pages = {S130 - S136},
      number = {Supplement 1},
      note = {Research and Development on Biomechanics in China},
      abstract = {In order to show the application of computational fluid dynamics in
      biomedical engineering, some numerical simulations of blood flow
      in arteries, such as hemodynamics of bypass graft for stenosed arteries,
      hemodynamics of stented aneurysm at the aortic arch, hemodynamics
      of bypass treatment for DeBakey III aortic dissection, and influence
      of blood flow on the thermal characteristics of microwave ablation,
      which were performed by the authors, were reviewed. These simulations
      can be a powerful tool for the computer assisted surgery in medical
      application.},
      file = {Qiao2008.pdf:Qiao2008.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0268-0033},
      keywords = {Computer assisted surgery},
      owner = {Thomas},
      timestamp = {2011.02.28}
    }
  • J. Qin, W. Pang, B. P. Nguyen, D. Ni, and C. Chui, “Particle-based simulation of blood flow and vessel wall interactions in virtual surgery,” in Proceedings of the 2010 Symposium on Information and Communication Technology, New York, NY, USA, 2010, pp. 128-133.
    [Bibtex]
    @INPROCEEDINGS{Qin2010b,
      author = {Qin, Jing and Pang, Wai-Man and Nguyen, Binh P. and Ni, Dong and
      Chui, Chee-Kongin},
      title = {Particle-based simulation of blood flow and vessel wall interactions
      in virtual surgery},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of the 2010 Symposium on Information and Communication
      Technology},
      year = {2010},
      series = {SoICT '10},
      pages = {128--133},
      address = {New York, NY, USA},
      publisher = {ACM},
      acmid = {1852636},
      file = {Qin2010b.pdf:Qin2010b.pdf:PDF},
      isbn = {978-1-4503-0105-3},
      keywords = {blood flow and vessel wall interactions, smoothed particle hydrodynamics,
      virtual surgery, TEC},
      location = {Hanoi, Viet nam},
      numpages = {6},
      owner = {Thomas},
      timestamp = {2011.02.23}
    }
  • N. Wilson, K. Wang, R. Dutton, and C. Taylor, “A software framework for creating patient specific geometric models from medical imaging data for simulation based medical planning of vascular surgery,” , pp. 449-456, 2010.
    [Bibtex]
    @CONFERENCE{Wilson2010,
      author = {Wilson, N. and Wang, K. and Dutton, R. and Taylor, C.},
      title = {A software framework for creating patient specific geometric models
      from medical imaging data for simulation based medical planning of
      vascular surgery},
      booktitle = {Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention--MICCAI
      2001},
      year = {2010},
      pages = {449 - 456},
      organization = {Springer},
      file = {Wilson2010.pdf:Wilson2010.pdf:PDF},
      owner = {Thomas},
      timestamp = {2011.02.23}
    }

Mechanics

  • J. P. iannotti, E. E. Spencer, and others, “Prosthetic positioning in total shoulder arthroplasty,” Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, vol. 14, iss. 1, p. S111 – S121, 2005.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Iannotti2005,
      author = {iannotti, J.P. and Spencer, E.E. and others},
      title = {Prosthetic positioning in total shoulder arthroplasty},
      journal = {Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery},
      year = {2005},
      volume = {14},
      pages = {S111 - S121},
      number = {1},
      abstract = {Accurate positioning of the prosthetic humeral head is necessary to
      reproduce normal glenohumeral kinematics and to avoid damage to the
      rotator cuff and impingement on the glenoid component or coracoacromial
      arch. Proper positioning of the head requires accurate placement
      of the stem and prosthetic designs that allow the head position to
      adapt to the variations in both normal and pathologic humeral anatomy.
      Glenoid malpositioning can lead to both humeral instability and increased
      stress of the glenoid component that may lead to premature glenoid
      loosening. This review summarizes the cadaveric and finite-element
      model that defines the abnormalities associated with humeral and
      glenoid component malpositioning.},
      file = {:C\:\\Thomas\\PHD\\Literature\\Articles\\Ianotti2005.pdf:PDF},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      publisher = {Elsevier},
      timestamp = {2010.10.26}
    }
  • B. Couteau, P. Mansat, E. Estivalèzes, R. Darmana, M. Mansat, and J. Egan, “Finite element analysis of the mechanical behavior of a scapula implanted with a glenoid prosthesis.,” Clinical biomechanics (Bristol, Avon), vol. 16, iss. 7, pp. 566-75, 2001.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Couteau2001,
      author = {Couteau, B and Mansat, P and Estival\`{e}zes, E and Darmana, R and
      Mansat, M and Egan, J},
      title = {Finite element analysis of the mechanical behavior of a scapula implanted
      with a glenoid prosthesis.},
      journal = {Clinical biomechanics (Bristol, Avon)},
      year = {2001},
      volume = {16},
      pages = {566-75},
      number = {7},
      month = {August},
      abstract = {The objective of the present study was to analyze the mechanical effect
      of some of the surgical variables encountered during shoulder arthroplasty
      using the finite element method. The effect of one eccentric load
      case, cement thickness and conformity has been investigated. DESIGN:
      A 3D finite element model of a healthy cadaveric scapula implanted
      with an anatomically shaped glenoid has been developed from computed
      tomography (CT) images. BACKGROUND: Glenoid component fixation can
      present the most difficult problem in total shoulder arthroplasty,
      loosening of this component remains one of the main complications.
      METHODS: The 3D finite element model was first validated by comparison
      with experimental measurements and by fitting of the mechanical properties
      of the cortical bone. Then the articular pressure location, the surface
      contact geometry and the cement thickness have been analyzed to observe
      their effect on stresses and displacements at the interfaces and
      within the scapular bone. RESULTS: The antero-posterior bending of
      the scapula was a notable feature and this was accentuated when an
      eccentric load was applied. The gleno-humeral contact area had a
      major role on the stress level in the supporting structures though
      but not on the global displacements. Varying the cement mantle modified
      stresses according to the load case and it essentially changed the
      latero-medial displacement of the cement relatively to the bone.
      CONCLUSIONS: This analysis provided an insight into the mechanical
      effects of an implanted scapula according to different parameters
      related to implantation technique. RELEVANCE: Results emphasized
      the role of some of the parameters a clinician may face. They demonstrated
      the importance of the humeral head centering in the horizontal plane.
      Conformity decreasing may involve drastic increase of stresses within
      structures and a thick cement mantle is not necessarily advantageous
      relatively to the stresses at the cement/bone interface.},
      file = {Couteau2001.pdf:Couteau2001.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0268-0033},
      keywords = {Arthroplasty,Arthroplasty: instrumentation,Articular,Biomechanics,Bone
      Cements,Cadaver,Computer Simulation,Equipment Design,Finite Element
      Analysis,Humans,Joint Prosthesis,Mechanical,Prosthesis Failure,Range
      of Motion,Scapula,Scapula: physiopathology,Scapula: radiography,Scapula:
      surgery,Shoulder Joint,Shoulder Joint: physiopathology,Shoulder Joint:
      radiography,Shoulder Joint: surgery,Stress,Tensile Strength,Tomography,X-Ray
      Computed, OCS, TEC},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      pmid = {11470298},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • C. Dick, J. Georgii, R. Burgkart, and R. Westermann, “Stress tensor field visualization for implant planning in orthopedics.,” IEEE transactions on visualization and computer graphics, vol. 15, iss. 6, pp. 1399-406, 2009.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Dick2009a,
      author = {Dick, Christian and Georgii, Joachim and Burgkart, Rainer and Westermann,
      R\"{u}diger},
      title = {Stress tensor field visualization for implant planning in orthopedics.},
      journal = {IEEE transactions on visualization and computer graphics},
      year = {2009},
      volume = {15},
      pages = {1399-406},
      number = {6},
      abstract = {We demonstrate the application of advanced 3D visualization techniques
      to determine the optimal implant design and position in hip joint
      replacement planning. Our methods take as input the physiological
      stress distribution inside a patient's bone under load and the stress
      distribution inside this bone under the same load after a simulated
      replacement surgery. The visualization aims at showing principal
      stress directions and magnitudes, as well as differences in both
      distributions. By visualizing changes of normal and shear stresses
      with respect to the principal stress directions of the physiological
      state, a comparative analysis of the physiological stress distribution
      and the stress distribution with implant is provided, and the implant
      parameters that most closely replicate the physiological stress state
      in order to avoid stress shielding can be determined. Our method
      combines volume rendering for the visualization of stress magnitudes
      with the tracing of short line segments for the visualization of
      stress directions. To improve depth perception, transparent, shaded,
      and antialiased lines are rendered in correct visibility order, and
      they are attenuated by the volume rendering. We use a focus+context
      approach to visually guide the user to relevant regions in the data,
      and to support a detailed stress analysis in these regions while
      preserving spatial context information. Since all of our techniques
      have been realized on the GPU, they can immediately react to changes
      in the simulated stress tensor field and thus provide an effective
      means for optimal implant selection and positioning in a computational
      steering environment.},
      file = {Dick2009a.pdf:Dick2009a.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {1077-2626},
      keywords = {Biomechanics,Computer Graphics,Diagnostic Imaging,Femur Head,Femur
      Head: surgery,Humans,Image Processing, Computer-Assisted,Image Processing,
      Computer-Assisted: methods,Imaging, Three-Dimensional,Imaging, Three-Dimensional:
      methods,Orthopedics,Orthopedics: methods,Stress, Mechanical, OTS,
      OCS, TEC, GPU},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      pmid = {19834214},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • C. Dick, J. Georgii, R. Burgkart, and R. Westermann, “A 3D Simulation System for Hip Joint Replacement Planning,” , pp. 2-5, 2009.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Dick2009b,
      author = {Dick, C and Georgii, J and Burgkart, R and Westermann, R},
      title = {A 3D Simulation System for Hip Joint Replacement Planning},
      year = {2009},
      pages = {2-5},
      abstract = {We present a tool for hip joint replacement planning that allows the
      surgeon to rank the long-term stabil- ity of an implant, and we show
      the application of this tool in a clinical routine setting. The tool
      allows the surgeon to predict the load transmission of an implant
      to the patient-specific bone. It is used to select of a set of available
      implants the one that most closely replicates the physiological stress
      state in order to avoid stress shielding. Advanced simulation technol-
      ogy is combined with 3D visualization options to provide quick and
      intuitive understanding of the generated results. Interac- tive feedback
      rates and intuitive control mechanisms facilitate the finding of
      an optimal implant shape with respect to the patient’s specific
      anatomy. By restricting to a predetermined implant position, which
      is in accordance with the selected position in a real surgery, the
      surgeon can quickly analyze a number of different implants under
      varying load conditions.},
      file = {Dick2009b.pdf:Dick2009b.pdf:PDF},
      keywords = {computational,finite elements,implant planning,orthopedics,steering,stress
      visualization, OTS, OCS, TEC, GPU},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • C. Dick, J. Georgii, R. Burgkart, and R. Westermann, “Computational Steering for Patient-Specific Implant Planning in Orthopedics,” Orthopedics, 2008.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Dick2008,
      author = {Dick, Christian and Georgii, Joachim and Burgkart, Rainer and Westermann,
      R\"{u}diger},
      title = {Computational Steering for Patient-Specific Implant Planning in Orthopedics},
      journal = {Orthopedics},
      year = {2008},
      abstract = {Fast and reliablemethods for predicting andmonitoring in-vivo bone
      strength are of great importance for hip joint replacement. To avoid
      adaptive remodeling with cortical thinning and increased porosity
      of the bone due to stress shielding, in a preoperative planning process
      the optimal implant design, size, and position has to be determined.
      This process involves interactive implant positioning within the
      bone as well as simulation and visualization of the stress within
      bone and implant due to exerting forces. In this paper, we present
      a prototype of such a visual analysis tool, which, to our best knowledge,
      provides the first computational steering environment for optimal
      implant selection and positioning. This prototype considers patient-specific
      biomechanical properties of the bone to select the optimal implant
      design, size, and position according to the prediction of individual
      load transfer from the implant to the bone. We have developed a fast
      and stable multigrid finite-element solver for hexahedral elements,
      which enables interactive simulation of the stress distribution within
      the bone and the implant. By utilizing a real-time GPU-method to
      detect elements that are covered by the moving implant, we can automatically
      generate computational models from patient-specific CT scans in real-time,
      and we can instantly feed these models into the simulation process.
      Hardware-accelerated volume ray-casting, which is extended by a new
      method to accurately visualize sub-hexahedron implant boundaries,
      provides a new quality of orthopedic surgery planning.},
      file = {Dick2008.pdf:Dick2008.pdf:PDF},
      keywords = {GPU, OCS, OTS},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • P. Favre, B. Moor, J. G. Snedeker, and C. Gerber, “Influence of component positioning on impingement in conventional total shoulder arthroplasty.,” Clinical biomechanics (Bristol, Avon), vol. 23, iss. 2, pp. 175-83, 2008.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Favre2008,
      author = {Favre, Philippe and Moor, Beat and Snedeker, Jess G and Gerber, Christian},
      title = {Influence of component positioning on impingement in conventional
      total shoulder arthroplasty.},
      journal = {Clinical biomechanics (Bristol, Avon)},
      year = {2008},
      volume = {23},
      pages = {175-83},
      number = {2},
      month = {February},
      abstract = {Clinical experience suggests that component impingement can lead to
      eccentric implant loading and thereby cause glenoid loosening in
      conventional total shoulder arthroplasty. This study tests the hypothesis
      that certain implant component positioning configurations may lead
      to impingement within the physiological range of motion. METHODS:
      A rigid-body model of the shoulder comprising the scapula and humerus
      was constructed. Within this 3D model, a commercially available total
      shoulder arthroplasty implant was positioned according to manufacturer
      guidelines. The configuration was modified around this default position
      to investigate the associated angle of inferior and superior impingement
      during glenohumeral elevation, as well as in lateral impingement
      during axial rotation at both 0 degrees and 60 degrees of glenohumeral
      elevation. Glenoid component size, version, inclination and inferior-superior
      offset as well as humeral component size, torsion, inclination, offset
      and height were examined. The influence of the humeral calcar anatomy
      was also investigated. FINDINGS: Certain implant configurations caused
      component impingement in the physiological range of motion. The most
      sensitive parameters affecting impingement were: (1) the inclination
      of the glenoid component, (2) the inferior-superior position of the
      humeral component along the resection line and (3) the prominence
      of the humeral calcar. Glenoid offset and inclination and humeral
      head offset and height directly affected subacromial impingement.
      INTERPRETATION: This study suggests that several intraoperatively
      adjustable implant positioning parameters can influence the likelihood
      of implant impingement in conventional total shoulder arthroplasty,
      and that the geometry of the humeral calcar should be taken into
      consideration when designing an operative strategy for shoulder joint
      replacement.},
      file = {Favre2008.pdf:Favre2008.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0268-0033},
      keywords = {Anatomic,Arthroplasty,Articular,Humans,Joint Prosthesis,Models,Range
      of Motion,Replacement,Replacement: methods,Shoulder Impingement Syndrome,Shoulder
      Impingement Syndrome: etiology,Shoulder Impingement Syndrome: physiopathology,Shoulder
      Joint,Shoulder Joint: physiopathology,Shoulder Joint: surgery, OTS,
      OCS, PLA},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      pmid = {17983693},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • P. R. Krekel, P. W. de Bruin, E. R. Valstar, F. H. Post, P. M. Rozing, and C. P. Botha, “Evaluation of bone impingement prediction in pre-operative planning for shoulder arthroplasty,” Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part H: Journal of Engineering in Medicine, vol. 223, iss. 7, pp. 813-822, 2009.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Krekel2009,
      author = {Krekel, P R and de Bruin, P W and Valstar, E R and Post, F H and
      Rozing, P M and Botha, C P},
      title = {Evaluation of bone impingement prediction in pre-operative planning
      for shoulder arthroplasty},
      journal = {Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part H: Journal
      of Engineering in Medicine},
      year = {2009},
      volume = {223},
      pages = {813-822},
      number = {7},
      month = {October},
      abstract = {In shoulder arthroplasty, malpositioning of pros-theses often leads
      to reduced post- operative range of motion (ROM) and complications
      such as impingement, loosening, and dislocation. Furthermore, the
      risk of impingement complications increases when reverse total prostheses
      are used. For this purpose a pre-operative planning system was developed
      that enables surgeons to perform a virtual shoulder replacement procedure.
      Our pre-operative planning system simulates patient-specific bone-determined
      ROM meant to reduce the risk of impingement complications and to
      improve the ROM of patients undergoing shoulder replacement surgery.
      This paper describes a validation experiment with the purpose of
      ratifying the clinical applicability and usefulness of the ROM simulation
      module for shoulder replacement surgery. The experiment was performed
      on cadaveric shoulders. A data connection was set up between the
      software environment and an existing intra-operative guidance system
      to track the relative positions of the bones. This allowed the patient-specific
      surface models to be visualized within the software for the position
      and alignment of the tracked bones. For both shoulders, ROM measurements
      were recorded and tagged with relevant information such as the type
      of prosthesis and the type ofmovement that was performed. The observed
      ROM and occurrences of impingement were compared with the simulated
      equivalents. The median deviation between observed impingement angles
      and simulated impingement angles was 20.30u with an interquartile
      range of 5.20u (from 23.40u to 1.80u). It was concluded that the
      ROM simulator is sufficiently accurate to fulfil its role as a supportive
      instrument for orthopaedic surgeons during shoulder replacement surgery.},
      file = {Krekel2009.pdf:Krekel2009.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0954-4119},
      keywords = {arthroplasty,medical visualization,motion,motion tracking,pre-operative
      planning,range of,shoulder, TEC, OCS},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }
  • N. Maurel, a Diop, and J. Grimberg, “A 3D finite element model of an implanted scapula: importance of a multiparametric validation using experimental data.,” Journal of biomechanics, vol. 38, iss. 9, pp. 1865-72, 2005.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Maurel2005,
      author = {Maurel, N and Diop, a and Grimberg, J},
      title = {A 3D finite element model of an implanted scapula: importance of
      a multiparametric validation using experimental data.},
      journal = {Journal of biomechanics},
      year = {2005},
      volume = {38},
      pages = {1865-72},
      number = {9},
      month = {September},
      abstract = {In order to help to understand the loosening phenomenon around gleno\"{\i}d
      prostheses, a 3D finite element model of a previously tested implanted
      scapula has been developed. The construction of the model was done
      using CT scans of the tested scapula. Different bone material properties
      were tested and shell elements or 8 nodes hexaedric elements were
      used to model the cortical bone. Surface contact elements were introduced
      on one hand between the bone and the lower part of the plate of the
      implant, and on the other, between the loading metallic ball and
      the upper surface of the implant. The results of the model were compared
      with those issued from in vitro experiments carried out on the same
      scapula. The evaluation of the model was done for nine cases of loading
      of 500 N distributed on the implant, in terms of strains (principal
      strains of six spots around peripheral cortex of the gleno\"{\i}d)
      and displacement of four points positioned on the implant. The best
      configuration of the model presented here, fits with experiments
      for most of the strains (difference lower than 150microdef) but it
      seems to be still too stiff (mainly in the lower part). Nevertheless,
      we want, in this paper, to underline the importance of doing a multiparametric
      validation for such a model. Indeed, some models can give correct
      results for one case of loading but bad results for another kind
      of loading, some others can give good results for one kind of compared
      parameters (like strains for instance) but bad results for the other
      one (like displacements).},
      file = {Maurel2005.pdf:Maurel2005.pdf:PDF},
      issn = {0021-9290},
      keywords = {Aged,Aged, 80 and over,Computer Simulation,Diagnosis, Computer-Assisted,Diagnosis,
      Computer-Assisted: methods,Elasticity,Equipment Failure Analysis,Equipment
      Failure Analysis: methods,Finite Element Analysis,Humans,Imaging,
      Three-Dimensional,Imaging, Three-Dimensional: methods,Joint Prosthesis,Male,Models,
      Biological,Prosthesis Failure,Prosthesis Fitting,Prosthesis Fitting:
      methods,Radiographic Image Interpretation, Computer-Assist,Risk Assessment,Risk
      Assessment: methods,Risk Factors,Scapula,Scapula: physiopathology,Scapula:
      radiography,Scapula: surgery,Stress, Mechanical,Weight-Bearing, OCS,
      TEC},
      owner = {thomaskroes},
      pmid = {16023474},
      timestamp = {2010.10.22}
    }

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